T Nation

Deadlifting PRs Without a Belt?

Hey all,

A newbish question: I was deadlifting a new PR today, and as I got closer to lockout, I could feel this weird pinch around my lower left stomach. Now I started to freak 'cos this seemed like the onset of a hernia, so i dumped it.

Gathered myself a few minutes later, the pain went away almost immediately so i felt comfortable with another try. No problem whatsoever, nailed the lift.

Has anyone ever experienced this? I’m considering that it was just piss poor form on the first lift, being a PR and all, and i focused a lot more on my technique the second time around, and didn’t feel anything.

But i also happenned to be doing it beltless, so maybe that pinch the first time around had to do with that? I feel I ought to go in for a belt now, but i’d just like to know if anyone out there dealt with the same sorta pain or ever deadlifted without a belt at some point.

Cheers and thanks.

Although I see the big powerlifters and strongmen competitors using belts during the deadlift I really can’t see where it helps/protects you.

In fact, I just bought a new 13mm lever belt and it tends to throw me out of my groove when deadlifting so I don’t use it. I love it for squats and olympic lifts however. Go fig…

Here’s a link to an interesting DL article at elitefitness.com:

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/deadlift_with_style.htm

I’ll have to try this (from the article):

Style Issue #6: How do you get the most out of your belt? When you deadlift, don’t make the belt too tight. I like to go one notch looser than my squat. If the belt is too tight, you’ll find it hard to pressurize your abs when you go down to get the bar.

Also, you’re likely to feel very uncomfortable in that bottom position. Instead, go one notch looser. Take a nice deep breath at the top while you are standing over the bar. Then squat, pressurizing the abs at the bottom, and PULL!

I’m thinking that the belt will be to loose to do any good at the top though.

I use a 13mm lever as well. I find leaving it unlevered and the lever spun around to my back is about all I need or want when DL’ing.

it could have been your form was off and you pinch something in hip/spine area. if after the next day or 2 you felt fine, then I wouldn’t worry.

but as a precaution after deadlifts or squats and you feel a pinch or something like that it’s good to lay on an ice pack around the affected area when you get home. even if you don’t feel anything at the moment, cause it’s usually a day later that you may get inflamation and unable to move or bend at the back, and by then the damage has already begun to set in.

i use my belt about as tight as it can go. i havent really had a problem other than some roughed up skin where the belt dug in. i dont have a problem gettin a big breath in at the top

i do like to go without the belt every once in a while just to make it so i dont rely on it as much. its good for at least 30lbs or so on my lifts but i think its mental

definitly one of my favorite buys tho… next is some chucks

I never use a belt.

You did the right thing. If something feels off, lower the weight and reset with better form.

The US clean and jerk record was performed without a belt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwMvo3KmFSs

I don’t like deadlifting in a belt at all, tight, loose, super loose, just dont like it.

also, I have had the same problem you have encountered, I only have this issue when I pull with a belt…

[quote]Sxio wrote:
I never use a belt.

You did the right thing. If something feels off, lower the weight and reset with better form. [/quote]

Ditto.

Belt is useless.

You can definitely do deadlift PR’s without a belt. I ditched my belt a while back and compete in raw powerlifting without one even though a belt is allowed to be worn in “raw” (which doesn’t make sense to me).

It’s all a matter of what you condition yourself for. If you train heavy in the deadlifts and work down from heavy 5’s, to triples, then doubles and singles in a smart way you should be fine.

I was surprised to read the other posts on here from those that have come to the same conclusion about the belts. I thought I was the only one that thought like this.

Olympic lifters seem to do fine without belts, but those I know in powerlifting seem to think that a belt is a must-have.

Let the attacks begin!

[quote]Raw Power wrote:

I was surprised to read the other posts on here from those that have come to the same conclusion about the belts. I thought I was the only one that thought like this.

Olympic lifters seem to do fine without belts, but those I know in powerlifting seem to think that a belt is a must-have.

Let the attacks begin![/quote]

Power lifters use all sorts of devices in their lifts. That is one sport I don’t understand. They do a 1000 lb squat – but with some special Titanium suit on and other power lifting “clothes”.

Well with the “proper equipment” I could lift 10,000 pounds. But it wouldn’t be “me”. It would be me and the equipment. I say if a power lifter needs their special clothes to lift 1000 lbs then they can’t lift 1000 lbs.

[quote]Andrew Dixon wrote:
The US clean and jerk record was performed without a belt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwMvo3KmFSs

[/quote]

That video was awesome, thanks.

I don’t like belts because they’re like cheating. It takes the weight out of you. If you deadlift 500 pounds with a belt, you might be carrying only 450 pound of it while the 50 goes to your belt. I’d rather lift 450 pounds raw without a belt. Same effective weight, less plates to setup.

lolololol
I can understand suits, but please explain how a belt gets any of the weight?

IMO is a belt absolutely neccessary? No, but The fact that its touching that area reminds you to tighten your core which is definitely necessary when deadlifting. Best advice is to try it, if it works for you use it. It’s not like the weight is being transfered to the belt.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
I don’t like belts because they’re like cheating. It takes the weight out of you. If you deadlift 500 pounds with a belt, you might be carrying only 450 pound of it while the 50 goes to your belt. I’d rather lift 450 pounds raw without a belt. Same effective weight, less plates to setup.[/quote]

I never use a belt, for anything, ever(except to hold my trousers up).
I feel the same about straps.

If I can’t lift it then I can’t lift it.

However, I am not, nor do I ever intend to be a powerlifter.

There was a funny scene in my gym recently where these lads, and they were quite big lads, were having a borderline panic attack because they had forgotten their straps on deadlift day. they were running around the gym trying to find someone, anyone, to lend them some straps. I was stood there thinking, just try it without, may improve your grip…

[quote]mmllcc wrote:
Raw Power wrote:

I was surprised to read the other posts on here from those that have come to the same conclusion about the belts. I thought I was the only one that thought like this.

Olympic lifters seem to do fine without belts, but those I know in powerlifting seem to think that a belt is a must-have.

Let the attacks begin!

Power lifters use all sorts of devices in their lifts. That is one sport I don’t understand. They do a 1000 lb squat – but with some special Titanium suit on and other power lifting “clothes”.

Well with the “proper equipment” I could lift 10,000 pounds. But it wouldn’t be “me”. It would be me and the equipment. I say if a power lifter needs their special clothes to lift 1000 lbs then they can’t lift 1000 lbs.[/quote]

Sorry, I’ve got to disagree here.

I compete Raw in Powerlifting, and I don’t use a belt, but I don’t have a problem with people who do.

There are different divisions for a reason. If you want to use shirts/suits/wraps, etc. then you compete equipped. The rules allow you to use equipment, so there is nothing wrong with it. If you don’t want to use equipment, then you compete Raw. Plain and simple.

Most guys that compete in anything want to use the best equipment out there. Hell, if the MLB said that everyone could start using titanium bats, don’t you think more than a few players would switch their bats in order to hit the ball a little further?

Look at golf, they have oversized clubs made out of the most exotic alloys, and their getting better every day. No one is telling them to go back to wooden clubs.

If NASCAR decided that you could add 100HP to your car, you know every mechanic would be under their hood trying to stuff more ponies in there.

Powerlifting is a sport, and there are numerous federations, with different divisions, with rules that allow for people to compete with or without equipment.

Thanks for all the help offered guys, I really appreciate it. I’ve decided that it was probably just poor form on my part, but I’m looking at it as a wake up call to focus on form at all times.

Cheers and thanks once again

[quote]Airtruth wrote:
lolololol
I can understand suits, but please explain how a belt gets any of the weight?
[/quote]

A belt builds pressure thoracic pressure and that pressure helps to hold your spine straight. It’s like a toothpaste tube, if it’s sealed and you squeeze it in the middle, then it will get quite firm and less easy to bend.

If a reminder is all people needed to hold their core tight, then they could just use a piece of string instead… it think it goes beyond helping people to tighten their cores… it just tightens the cores for them.

[quote]Modi wrote:
mmllcc wrote:
Raw Power wrote:

I was surprised to read the other posts on here from those that have come to the same conclusion about the belts. I thought I was the only one that thought like this.

Olympic lifters seem to do fine without belts, but those I know in powerlifting seem to think that a belt is a must-have.

Let the attacks begin!

Power lifters use all sorts of devices in their lifts. That is one sport I don’t understand. They do a 1000 lb squat – but with some special Titanium suit on and other power lifting “clothes”.

Well with the “proper equipment” I could lift 10,000 pounds. But it wouldn’t be “me”. It would be me and the equipment. I say if a power lifter needs their special clothes to lift 1000 lbs then they can’t lift 1000 lbs.

Sorry, I’ve got to disagree here.

I compete Raw in Powerlifting, and I don’t use a belt, but I don’t have a problem with people who do.

There are different divisions for a reason. If you want to use shirts/suits/wraps, etc. then you compete equipped. The rules allow you to use equipment, so there is nothing wrong with it. If you don’t want to use equipment, then you compete Raw. Plain and simple.

Most guys that compete in anything want to use the best equipment out there. Hell, if the MLB said that everyone could start using titanium bats, don’t you think more than a few players would switch their bats in order to hit the ball a little further?

Look at golf, they have oversized clubs made out of the most exotic alloys, and their getting better every day. No one is telling them to go back to wooden clubs.

If NASCAR decided that you could add 100HP to your car, you know every mechanic would be under their hood trying to stuff more ponies in there.

Powerlifting is a sport, and there are numerous federations, with different divisions, with rules that allow for people to compete with or without equipment. [/quote]

Modi… Modi… haven’t you learned your lesson yet? People run there mouth about things they know nothing about. I read most of these posts but just resign to chuckle to myself.

Truly strong people don’t rag on others or make excuses for why they aren’t lifting the big weight.

I’m a big cheater… I’m so ashamed.

meat