T Nation

Deadlifting Grip

Alright im becoming bit fustrated with my deadlift. When lifting heavy with Deadlift my hands always give out before the rest of my body. Its extemely irritating as im forced to put the bar down … or drop it. What usually happens is first my thumb on my left comes loose so im holding it with my 4 fingers and i might get one more rep before im forced to put the bar down.
And then after for about two minutes my fingers are curled right up and it takes awhile for them to relax. I use the normal one hand over, one hand under way of lifting… but im pretty stumped for ideas of how to fix this.
I still get a good workout just not as good as it could be :slight_smile:

[quote]PO64336Whiskey wrote:
Alright im becoming bit fustrated with my deadlift. When lifting heavy with Deadlift my hands always give out before the rest of my body. Its extemely irritating as im forced to put the bar down … or drop it. What usually happens is first my thumb on my left comes loose so im holding it with my 4 fingers and i might get one more rep before im forced to put the bar down.
And then after for about two minutes my fingers are curled right up and it takes awhile for them to relax. I use the normal one hand over, one hand under way of lifting… but im pretty stumped for ideas of how to fix this.
I still get a good workout just not as good as it could be :slight_smile: [/quote]

there are a bunch of things you can do. your problem is pretty common.
try holds with the bar. get in the rack and go above your max. put the pins almost at lockout. pick the bar up and hold it. have someone time you. try to beat your time on future workouts.

you can also do plate pinches. start with two ten pound plates. put them together and pick them up just using your fingers. Hold them for as long as you can. work up to 25’s, 35’s and then 45’s

if you don’t use chalk, start.

meat

I cant remember what the technique is called but I can try and describe it to you. Wrap your hand around the bar as usual except that you will place your thumb under your fingers and squeeze tightly. This can take some getting used to but it will lock your grip in. I have been using this successfully for years. Hope this helps

Try pincking a few plates in your hands fron ground to standing for time. Make sure its smooth side out!

Are you against using straps? If you want burn out your forearms and hands, then burn them out and then add the straps for the remaining sets.

First, use straps on max loads until you build up grip strength. Why sacrifice the workout to wait for improved grip strength.

Second, I don’t like the one under one over grip. Especially as the loads go up. Use a two over grip.

If you have one available try pulling with a fat bar they weight will not be nearly as high at first just because your hands are not used to holding it. But after a while you will get up to your normal Deadlift weight with the fat bar. Once you do that you can change back to the regular bar and you will notice the weight move easier and your grip will now be one of your strengths.

Once your grip gives out, put the bar down, switch your grip, then continue the set. I can generally get a few more reps this way. Use chalk if you aren’t (and if you can).

The grip exercises people have already posted (timed bar holds, plate pinches) are probably the best for developing a good supporting grip for deadlifting. Heavy farmer’s walks are also great.

[quote]dklein wrote:
I cant remember what the technique is called but I can try and describe it to you. Wrap your hand around the bar as usual except that you will place your thumb under your fingers and squeeze tightly. This can take some getting used to but it will lock your grip in. I have been using this successfully for years. Hope this helps[/quote]

That’s a hook grip, and it’s the best lifting technique I’ve learned in the past year.

[quote]Steel Nation wrote:
dklein wrote:
I cant remember what the technique is called but I can try and describe it to you. Wrap your hand around the bar as usual except that you will place your thumb under your fingers and squeeze tightly. This can take some getting used to but it will lock your grip in. I have been using this successfully for years. Hope this helps

That’s a hook grip, and it’s the best lifting technique I’ve learned in the past year.[/quote]

Ditto.

DB

People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

[quote]summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.[/quote]

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground.

[quote]maraudermeat wrote:
summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground. [/quote]

Agreed. Also, plate pinching is a whole lot of fun and all, but I think gripping a few hundred pounds is probably going to provide more stimulus for grip strength than pinching a couple of plates.

Try going as heavy as you can on your deadlifts with a triditional DL grip, then add weight and switch to the staggered grip, and then keep adding weight until you have to switch over to the hook grip. The problem with plate pinching is that 10’s become very easy very quickly, and 25’s, well if you are pinching a couple of 25lb plates, then grip strength is not even a thought. There is nothing in between.

[quote]Modi wrote:
maraudermeat wrote:
summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground.

Agreed. Also, plate pinching is a whole lot of fun and all, but I think gripping a few hundred pounds is probably going to provide more stimulus for grip strength than pinching a couple of plates.

Try going as heavy as you can on your deadlifts with a triditional DL grip, then add weight and switch to the staggered grip, and then keep adding weight until you have to switch over to the hook grip. The problem with plate pinching is that 10’s become very easy very quickly, and 25’s, well if you are pinching a couple of 25lb plates, then grip strength is not even a thought. There is nothing in between.
[/quote]

Pinching 2 25’s isn’t all that impressive. Pinching 2 35’s is pretty good, but 45’s are considered a nearly world-class feat of strength. But there are ways to bridge the gap between 10’s and 25’s. Put a bar through the middle and hang some 5’s one each side. Use a chain and do the same thing. Get creative.

[quote]OneEye wrote:
Modi wrote:
maraudermeat wrote:
summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground.

Agreed. Also, plate pinching is a whole lot of fun and all, but I think gripping a few hundred pounds is probably going to provide more stimulus for grip strength than pinching a couple of plates.

Try going as heavy as you can on your deadlifts with a triditional DL grip, then add weight and switch to the staggered grip, and then keep adding weight until you have to switch over to the hook grip. The problem with plate pinching is that 10’s become very easy very quickly, and 25’s, well if you are pinching a couple of 25lb plates, then grip strength is not even a thought. There is nothing in between.

Pinching 2 25’s isn’t all that impressive. Pinching 2 35’s is pretty good, but 45’s are considered a nearly world-class feat of strength. But there are ways to bridge the gap between 10’s and 25’s. Put a bar through the middle and hang some 5’s one each side. Use a chain and do the same thing. Get creative.[/quote]

Depends on the the plates and which way they are facing, smooth 25’s are impressive. Putting a bar through the middle defeats the purpose of not letting them slip apart. Anyways, whatever floats your boat. I just prefer to lift heavy without straps and let my forearms catch up. That’s just my take on it.

[quote]Modi wrote:
OneEye wrote:
Modi wrote:
maraudermeat wrote:
summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground.

Agreed. Also, plate pinching is a whole lot of fun and all, but I think gripping a few hundred pounds is probably going to provide more stimulus for grip strength than pinching a couple of plates.

Try going as heavy as you can on your deadlifts with a triditional DL grip, then add weight and switch to the staggered grip, and then keep adding weight until you have to switch over to the hook grip. The problem with plate pinching is that 10’s become very easy very quickly, and 25’s, well if you are pinching a couple of 25lb plates, then grip strength is not even a thought. There is nothing in between.

Pinching 2 25’s isn’t all that impressive. Pinching 2 35’s is pretty good, but 45’s are considered a nearly world-class feat of strength. But there are ways to bridge the gap between 10’s and 25’s. Put a bar through the middle and hang some 5’s one each side. Use a chain and do the same thing. Get creative.

Depends on the the plates and which way they are facing, smooth 25’s are impressive.[/quote]

No, not really. I can do that without chalk, and I don’t have super strong hands.

To an extent, yes, but being able to support the extra weight is a good way to bridge the gap. This has been tried and true in the grip community, so I’m not just talking out my ass. I believe John Brookfield advocates this as well.

That’s fine, but I can tell you from experience and from the opinions of those far more knowledgeable than I that plate pinching is one of the best ways to build your supporting strength. Timed bar holds and block weight lifts are also great. It isn’t necessarily about using huge poundages, because the leverage of pinching makes up the difference in poundage.

[quote]OneEye wrote:
Modi wrote:
OneEye wrote:
Modi wrote:
maraudermeat wrote:
summa wrote:
People seem to think you are a pussy if you use straps but why not? If your grip is the weak link as it shoud be, then straps only make sense.

In my opinion, you should be able to hold more weight than you can pull. If you can’t, grip work is needed. now, if i’m doing rack pulls with weights that are a lot heavier than my max pull, I’ll use straps. the straps only come out when I’m over 100lbs over my max pull off the ground.

Agreed. Also, plate pinching is a whole lot of fun and all, but I think gripping a few hundred pounds is probably going to provide more stimulus for grip strength than pinching a couple of plates.

Try going as heavy as you can on your deadlifts with a triditional DL grip, then add weight and switch to the staggered grip, and then keep adding weight until you have to switch over to the hook grip. The problem with plate pinching is that 10’s become very easy very quickly, and 25’s, well if you are pinching a couple of 25lb plates, then grip strength is not even a thought. There is nothing in between.

Pinching 2 25’s isn’t all that impressive. Pinching 2 35’s is pretty good, but 45’s are considered a nearly world-class feat of strength. But there are ways to bridge the gap between 10’s and 25’s. Put a bar through the middle and hang some 5’s one each side. Use a chain and do the same thing. Get creative.

Depends on the the plates and which way they are facing, smooth 25’s are impressive.

No, not really. I can do that without chalk, and I don’t have super strong hands.

Putting a bar through the middle defeats the purpose of not letting them slip apart.

To an extent, yes, but being able to support the extra weight is a good way to bridge the gap. This has been tried and true in the grip community, so I’m not just talking out my ass. I believe John Brookfield advocates this as well.

Anyways, whatever floats your boat. I just prefer to lift heavy without straps and let my forearms catch up. That’s just my take on it.

That’s fine, but I can tell you from experience and from the opinions of those far more knowledgeable than I that plate pinching is one of the best ways to build your supporting strength. Timed bar holds and block weight lifts are also great. It isn’t necessarily about using huge poundages, because the leverage of pinching makes up the difference in poundage.[/quote]

I’m not a member of the grip community, and I am not knocking grip strength. Since your avatar is a picture of a hand gripping, I am going to assume you know more about the sport than I do. I have tried to avoid any assistive devices over the years (belts, straps, etc) just because that is what I do. I don’t judge people based on what they want to do. I know this isn’t the argument at hand, I am just explaining myself.

I like to look as strong as I am and be as strong as I look. I do that by lifting heavy, and forcing my weak links to catch up.

I don’t know enough about what it is that you do to argue with you. I don’t know how long you are supposed to hold those plates to be judged as average, above average or whatever. I will take a step back and let you explain your methods, and maybe learn a little in the process.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

Straps are easy to get dependent on though. I’m not a big proponent, but I suppose if used properly and sparingly.

I have the same problem and I have started to perform bar holds. Over the past few weeks I have seen improvement in my grip. I don’t want to become dependent on the straps and I would like to focus on grip strength before I go that route. If I can’t make enough improvement I may add straps for a couple sets.