T Nation

Deadlifting Bar Recommendations?


#1

I'm looking for a bar that I will use exclusively for pulling. Right now, I use my Burgenor & Rippetoe bar from Rogue for everything, but it has a centre knurl, which is not ideal for pulling :). I've given myself about $400 to shop around with, but will consider paying more if someone convinces me that a more expensive bar will improve my deadlift.

Any thoughts?


#2

I ain’t too knowledgeable about bars though I’ve read up on most of the popular ones (Texas power bar, Westside bar, etc) but I would go as far as to say no bar in the world will “improve” your deadlift. The federation you are competing in would also dictate the kind of bar you need (deadlift bar vs power bar, etc).


#3

[quote]Benanything wrote:
I ain’t too knowledgeable about bars though I’ve read up on most of the popular ones (Texas power bar, Westside bar, etc) but I would go as far as to say no bar in the world will “improve” your deadlift. The federation you are competing in would also dictate the kind of bar you need (deadlift bar vs power bar, etc).[/quote]

Thanks - I get your point about the bar not being able to improve my deadlift. If I switch to a better bar and lift more as a result, that shouldn’t improve my deadlift with my inferior bar. I guess I just want to see how much I can lift using a similar bar as elite lifters. I am only intermediate, and only do powerlifting for health and as a passion - I do not compete (other than against myself).


#4

I have a borderline sexual attraction my texas deadlift bar. It’s well built, strong, amazing knurling and good whip, with a small enough diameter to really get your hands around. I have heard that people like the okie deadlift bar even more, as it is apparently whippier with even sharper knurling, but I have never used one to compare.

I find the benefit of using a deadlift bar in training is that is spares my lower back. By having a whippy bar, it means that I break the weight off the floor at a slightly higher elevation that I would with a stiffer bar, which reduces ROM and strain on my lower back. This in turn means I can hammer the deadlift harder and more frequently (especially when you factor in that I use ROM progression). Additionally, when I AM forced to pull with a stiffer bar in competition, it actually feels like I get better leg drive, since now my hips are lower at the start of the pull compared to in training.

Basically, I observe nothing but positives training with a deadlift bar, even if I compete without one. However, your mileage may very, and other trainees have reported opposite findings.


#5

I’ve been using the Texas Squat bar for everything, it’s longer, thicker and stiffer. I like how it feels to get my hands around it.

I’m telling myself that pressing with a thicker bar will make my wrists and grip stronger. Deadlifting is “better” on the thick bar with no flex because it’s “harder.”

I think the important thing is that a bar can get me hype! If a different barbell can placebo effect me into a better workout, I may be sorta childish, but at least I’m having the better workouts! Some people don’t get as excited about/by their equipment, so they may not think a specialty bar is as cool.

What do you guys think about the lack of center knurling on the d.l. bar? Its cool not to get scrape up my fancy shorts, but the knurling on the sides still gets my legs. You bros who pull sumo get absolutely cheese-gratered!

Also, if you plan to use the d.l. bar in the power-rack, lifting from pins be careful. The extra long, whippy bar is not the best bar for this stuff.


#6

Going to second the Texas deadlift bar for that price range, had mine for about 2 years and love it. I think people really overstate how much you get out of a DL bar compared to a stiff one, it feels easier on my back and is much nicer to grip since it has some aggressive knurling on it.


#7

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
I’ve been using the Texas Squat bar for everything, it’s longer, thicker and stiffer. I like how it feels to get my hands around it.

I’m telling myself that pressing with a thicker bar will make my wrists and grip stronger. Deadlifting is “better” on the thick bar with no flex because it’s “harder.”

I think the important thing is that a bar can get me hype! If a different barbell can placebo effect me into a better workout, I may be sorta childish, but at least I’m having the better workouts! Some people don’t get as excited about/by their equipment, so they may not think a specialty bar is as cool.

What do you guys think about the lack of center knurling on the d.l. bar? Its cool not to get scrape up my fancy shorts, but the knurling on the sides still gets my legs. You bros who pull sumo get absolutely cheese-gratered!

Also, if you plan to use the d.l. bar in the power-rack, lifting from pins be careful. The extra long, whippy bar is not the best bar for this stuff.[/quote]

Doing rack pulls with a deadlift bar should be a punishable offense, haha. Save that stuff for a beater bar.

I like the lack of center knurling just fine, although I still get scraped up on the sides. This does bring up a good point though about transitioning between the two.

On the texas deadlift bar, the knurling on the sides is actually slightly further out than on a power bar, since it’s a slightly longer bar. I grip exactly at the point where the knurling ends on the deadlift bar, but on a power bar I need to actually grip slightly outside of that point to have the same hand spacing. I learned this the hard way on a tire deadlift using a power bar. I gripped where the knurl ended, and my set-up was jacked up.


#8

I get to train with an Okie (I’m not sure about the price, so I don’t know if this is a viable option for you), and I LOVE it. The smaller diameter and aggressive knurling mean that grip is NEVER an issue. That being the case, my “work” is focused solely on my setup and the weight. I figured out by doing some work at home and some at the YMCA with a thick, stiff bar that an inferior grip will inhibit my pull. If my grip is even slightly unsure, I just can’t pull as hard. Lighter weight “feels” heavier. So, while it is a luxury, if you can afford it, I do believe it will enhance your deadlift training.


#9

[quote]MarcF wrote:
I’m looking for a bar that I will use exclusively for pulling. Right now, I use my Burgenor & Rippetoe bar from Rogue for everything, but it has a centre knurl, which is not ideal for pulling :). I’ve given myself about $400 to shop around with, but will consider paying more if someone convinces me that a more expensive bar will improve my deadlift.

Any thoughts?[/quote]

Texas DL bar


#10

Could someone comment on differences between DL and Olybars? I train with a stiff bar and bendy DL bar throws me off on the platform. Would training with olympic bar be simmilar to using deadlift bar?


#11

Texas DL bar all the way.


#12

[quote]Papa Bear wrote:
Could someone comment on differences between DL and Olybars? I train with a stiff bar and bendy DL bar throws me off on the platform. Would training with olympic bar be simmilar to using deadlift bar?[/quote]

A deadlift bar generally has slack between the bar and the collar, allowing you to pre bend the bar before initiating the pull giving you a tighter setup.

An olybar has more collar spin so that the weights don’t rotate the bar when violently lifting it over head. There is a little play in the bar compared to a power bar but much less than a deadlift bar.

Super whippy snatches are no bueno.


#13

[quote]corstijeir wrote:

[quote]Papa Bear wrote:
Could someone comment on differences between DL and Olybars? I train with a stiff bar and bendy DL bar throws me off on the platform. Would training with olympic bar be simmilar to using deadlift bar?[/quote]

A deadlift bar generally has slack between the bar and the collar, allowing you to pre bend the bar before initiating the pull giving you a tighter setup.

An olybar has more collar spin so that the weights don’t rotate the bar when violently lifting it over head. There is a little play in the bar compared to a power bar but much less than a deadlift bar.

Super whippy snatches are no bueno.[/quote]

Thanks


#14

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I have a borderline sexual attraction my texas deadlift bar. It’s well built, strong, amazing knurling and good whip, with a small enough diameter to really get your hands around. I have heard that people like the okie deadlift bar even more, as it is apparently whippier with even sharper knurling, but I have never used one to compare.

I find the benefit of using a deadlift bar in training is that is spares my lower back. By having a whippy bar, it means that I break the weight off the floor at a slightly higher elevation that I would with a stiffer bar, which reduces ROM and strain on my lower back. This in turn means I can hammer the deadlift harder and more frequently (especially when you factor in that I use ROM progression). Additionally, when I AM forced to pull with a stiffer bar in competition, it actually feels like I get better leg drive, since now my hips are lower at the start of the pull compared to in training.

Basically, I observe nothing but positives training with a deadlift bar, even if I compete without one. However, your mileage may very, and other trainees have reported opposite findings.[/quote]

Thanks for this response. Have you ever tried sumo style with the TDL bar? I wonder what impact the extra whip would have off the floor (given that sumos are harder off the floor)?


#15

[quote]MarcF wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I have a borderline sexual attraction my texas deadlift bar. It’s well built, strong, amazing knurling and good whip, with a small enough diameter to really get your hands around. I have heard that people like the okie deadlift bar even more, as it is apparently whippier with even sharper knurling, but I have never used one to compare.

I find the benefit of using a deadlift bar in training is that is spares my lower back. By having a whippy bar, it means that I break the weight off the floor at a slightly higher elevation that I would with a stiffer bar, which reduces ROM and strain on my lower back. This in turn means I can hammer the deadlift harder and more frequently (especially when you factor in that I use ROM progression). Additionally, when I AM forced to pull with a stiffer bar in competition, it actually feels like I get better leg drive, since now my hips are lower at the start of the pull compared to in training.

Basically, I observe nothing but positives training with a deadlift bar, even if I compete without one. However, your mileage may very, and other trainees have reported opposite findings.[/quote]

Thanks for this response. Have you ever tried sumo style with the TDL bar? I wonder what impact the extra whip would have off the floor (given that sumos are harder off the floor)?[/quote]

I have not pulled a sumo deadlift since 2005, haha. Sorry, no data on it. If your goal is to pull exclusively sumo, elitefts sell a sumo deadlift bar. Apparently, it’s a texas deadlift bar with the extra knurling filed off to make it slide up even easier.


#16

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]MarcF wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I have a borderline sexual attraction my texas deadlift bar. It’s well built, strong, amazing knurling and good whip, with a small enough diameter to really get your hands around. I have heard that people like the okie deadlift bar even more, as it is apparently whippier with even sharper knurling, but I have never used one to compare.

I find the benefit of using a deadlift bar in training is that is spares my lower back. By having a whippy bar, it means that I break the weight off the floor at a slightly higher elevation that I would with a stiffer bar, which reduces ROM and strain on my lower back. This in turn means I can hammer the deadlift harder and more frequently (especially when you factor in that I use ROM progression). Additionally, when I AM forced to pull with a stiffer bar in competition, it actually feels like I get better leg drive, since now my hips are lower at the start of the pull compared to in training.

Basically, I observe nothing but positives training with a deadlift bar, even if I compete without one. However, your mileage may very, and other trainees have reported opposite findings.[/quote]

Thanks for this response. Have you ever tried sumo style with the TDL bar? I wonder what impact the extra whip would have off the floor (given that sumos are harder off the floor)?[/quote]

I have not pulled a sumo deadlift since 2005, haha. Sorry, no data on it. If your goal is to pull exclusively sumo, elitefts sell a sumo deadlift bar. Apparently, it’s a texas deadlift bar with the extra knurling filed off to make it slide up even easier.
[/quote]

Hi! Sumo Puller here!

The texas DL bar works just fine for sumo. You still want to be able to pull the slack out of the bar giving it that nice pre bend and the TDL works just great for that. I don’t personally have any issues with the knurling on my shins, whether that’s just from being used to it or wearing tall socks I don’t know.

I honestly don’t do any form of DL other than RDL and rack pulls with anything but the deadlift bar. Block pulls, deficit, conventional, sumo, chains, bands, you name it all work great with the deadlift bar.


#17

[quote]corstijeir wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]MarcF wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I have a borderline sexual attraction my texas deadlift bar. It’s well built, strong, amazing knurling and good whip, with a small enough diameter to really get your hands around. I have heard that people like the okie deadlift bar even more, as it is apparently whippier with even sharper knurling, but I have never used one to compare.

I find the benefit of using a deadlift bar in training is that is spares my lower back. By having a whippy bar, it means that I break the weight off the floor at a slightly higher elevation that I would with a stiffer bar, which reduces ROM and strain on my lower back. This in turn means I can hammer the deadlift harder and more frequently (especially when you factor in that I use ROM progression). Additionally, when I AM forced to pull with a stiffer bar in competition, it actually feels like I get better leg drive, since now my hips are lower at the start of the pull compared to in training.

Basically, I observe nothing but positives training with a deadlift bar, even if I compete without one. However, your mileage may very, and other trainees have reported opposite findings.[/quote]

Thanks for this response. Have you ever tried sumo style with the TDL bar? I wonder what impact the extra whip would have off the floor (given that sumos are harder off the floor)?[/quote]

I have not pulled a sumo deadlift since 2005, haha. Sorry, no data on it. If your goal is to pull exclusively sumo, elitefts sell a sumo deadlift bar. Apparently, it’s a texas deadlift bar with the extra knurling filed off to make it slide up even easier.
[/quote]

Hi! Sumo Puller here!

The texas DL bar works just fine for sumo. You still want to be able to pull the slack out of the bar giving it that nice pre bend and the TDL works just great for that. I don’t personally have any issues with the knurling on my shins, whether that’s just from being used to it or wearing tall socks I don’t know.

I honestly don’t do any form of DL other than RDL and rack pulls with anything but the deadlift bar. Block pulls, deficit, conventional, sumo, chains, bands, you name it all work great with the deadlift bar.[/quote]

Thanks for this (and to everyone else for all your thoughts). Leaning towards TDL at the moment, but will hold off for a week or so as I always do before making any significant purchase. By the way, I read an interesting thread on the Okie bar on “another website” (that I probably can’t provide a link here). Some interesting legal issues going on in the family apparently…


#18

Ivanko makes a really nice power bar. (okay, just checked US prices and it’s about 200$ more than the texas bar, my bad. The Texas Bars aren’t cheap down here, comparable to the Ivanko)


#19

Buddy Capps Original Texas DL bar hands down. There’s a vendor on Ebay that has them for a great price and free shipping. I think I got mine for $439