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Deadlift Training: Touch and Go vs Deadstop?


#1

Hello all, I have a question to all you powerlifters. I see two types of deadlift training during reps. there is dead stop and touch and go. By touch and go I don’t mean slamming the bar on the floor and using momentum to do the next rep. That’s just stupid, I see people like the GOAT Ed Coan and silent mike, using the real touch and go method. I have heard arguments for this type of training like “It helps you dial in your technique” and it is true for me at least. But, then I hear the dead-stop argument such as “You will be stronger off the floor bu using dead-stop”. I really want to increase my deadlift this training cycle. Hopefully, you guys can answer this thread! Thank you :slight_smile:


#2

(touch and go) as you can see they let the bar touch the floor for a second and then they pull again.

(dead-stop) pete here lets the bar rest on the floor and then resets and pulls again.


#3

Pretty much both ways work well enough.

I dig the way Coan and Silent Mike suggest that you pull and agree with the benefits but I’ve always deadlifted with dead stop reps and am still making gains so feel no need to switch it up.

I think slightly less/more is missing in here somewhere. It’s not like Coan style deadlifting will build no strength off the floor. It may just carryover very slightly less than stop and reset reps to your comp lift. This “difference” could easily be cancelled out by the improvements in starting position you get with touch and go.

If you’re incredibly shit off the floor probably better to dead stop. If you’re only as bad as most people you can go either way.

Train whichever way you like. Try switching it up but don’t expect all kinds of gains if other variables/program is not up to scratch.


#4

You haven’t actually asked a question.

I made the most growth pulling touch and go.


#5

What you are calling touch and go is dead stop, just without resetting between each rep. I don’t see a big difference one way or another there. As for touch and go where you just touch the floor and pull the next rep, I don’t personally do that but I wouldn’t call it stupid either. People like Chris Duffin and Shawn Doyle do that, and it isn’t because they are dumb and don’t know how to lift properly. That style give more time under tension and can allow you to do more reps, but will obviously not work the initial pull off the floor as much so if that is a weak point then this is definitely not the way you should train your deadlift.


#6

If you apply to the International Deadlift Committee they will allow you to use both in your training without having to fear persecution.

Do it when you put in a request for permission to use straps amd to hitch.


#7

It’s on the same form you use to apply for doctor-assisted suicide.


#8

Anything 5 reps an under I Deadstop each one, if Im doing some higher rep sets Ill touch and go with a very controlled motion, no bouncing. Evens out pretty good


#9

I would say both of those are dead stop. In the top video he’s just controlling the eccentric and maintaining his position. In the bottom video there’s no eccentric work - - he just drops it and starts over.

Both are tools to achieve a goal. True touch and go doesn’t have that pause; as soon as the weight touches the floor you pull. There will be some bounce if you’re using bumpers. I’ve never tried it with plates so I can’t say if it helps with getting the weight off the ground in those first inches.

I’ve noticed it’s easier to do touch and go for multiple reps. That tells me that I’m using the stretch reflex and inertia to help. It’s not a bad thing because I can get more reps but it’s also not the same as a dead stop pull.


#10

I train my clean deadlift and clean pulls from dead stop, and focus on my position and power.

If I want continuous tension, I’ll just do heavy RDLs.


#11

Deadstop makes for a perfect beginning posture and power off the floor.
touch and go increases hypertrophic stimuli as well as endurance it does increase eccentric strength better too


#12

Wouldn’t deadstop make more sense for powerlifters, because you essentially pull a series of singles? You could make every rep identical to your comp deadlift, whereas touch and go makes only the first rep identical. I’m asking a question, not offering an opinion.


#13

This would be true if your purpose for deadlifting is practice rather than strength/size building. But even then, there is a stretch reflex in the second rep and beyond that does not exist in the first rep of a set, even when deadstop.


#14

Some people actually only pull singles in the deadlift, and here’s the reason:

The stretch reflex can make subsequent reps a bit easier and also change your starting position slightly.


#15

[quote=“mikey1871, post:1, topic:235588, full:true”]
Hello all, I have a question to all you powerlifters. I see two types of deadlift training during reps. there is dead stop and touch and go. By touch and go I don’t mean slamming the bar on the floor and using momentum to do the next rep. That’s just stupid, I see people like the GOAT Ed Coan and silent mike, using the real touch and go method. I have heard arguments for this type of training like “It helps you dial in your technique” and it is true for me at least. But, then I hear the dead-stop argument such as “You will be stronger off the floor bu using dead-stop”. I really want to increase my deadlift this training cycle. Hopefully, you guys can answer this thread! Thank you[/quote]

Touch And Go Deadlifts

This method elicits a different training response. Essentially, it falls into the category of…

Reactive Strength Training

This method evokes the Stretch Reflex. The transition from Eccentric Action to Concentric Contraction is bridged by bouncing out of the bottom part of an exercise.

Research has demonstrated up to 18% more force is produced when the Stretch Reflex is elicited. That means you increase more force production; pull/push more weight and move faster.

Eccentric Deadlift Bar Speed

Allowing the bar into a controlled “Free Fall” (slamming into the platform) increases the force you will generate in the transition from Eccentric Action to Concentric Contraction. In other words, you are going to move more weight coming off the floor.

The Deadlift Style you employ is the determinate factor of if Bouncing The Deadlift is productive or counter productive.

Conventional Dealifters

Bouncing or Touch and Go Deadlifts is a productive training method for most Conventional Deadlifters. That because Conventional Deadlfiters are strong off the floor,

Thus, Dead Stop Conventional Deadlifts overload the first 1/3 of the movement, the strongest link but does little at overloading the weakest link.

The knee area is traditionally the weak link in the Conventional Deadlift. That means Dead Stops don’t allow much overloading in the knee area.

The Benefits of Bouncing/Touch and Go Conventional Deadlifts

  1. It increease the loading in the sticking point, knee area.

  2. It develops and increases Power off the floor, via Stretch Reflex Training.

Sumo Deadlifters

Bouncing/Touch and Go Sumo Deadllifts may increase Power off the floor. However, the focus for Sumo Deadlifts should be on increasing Strength for greater Leg Drive.

Belt Squat with a Sumo Deadlift Stance is one of the most effective exercises.

Kenny Croxdale