T Nation

Deadlift Technique Question


#1

I've always started my deadlifts from a standing position and execute reps without touching the weight to the floor (my max is 17 reps with 315 pds like this).

I was told at my gym (by a hardcore powerlifter) that this was wrong.... that I'd never reap the full benefit from the exercise that way... but he couldn't say why!

IS there a rationale for this for me to change? Thank you!


#2

My first question is why on earth are you doing 17 rep deadlifts?

Start on the floor, make sure you're whole body is tight (someone might be able to point out the Ian King article/Q&A where he goes over proper deadlift technique) and pull. When you return to the floor, you can pause, reset and pull again.

The actual pause on the floor is what makes it harder and arguably more effective. You have to overcome the inertia of the weight to get it going again. You're reducing the stretch shortening cycle with the pause on the floor as well, which again forces your muscles to work harder to get that weight moving again. As well, when you pause, you can reset your position and make sure your form is spot on. This will likely reduce the liklihood of injury. Think of it as a set of singles.

But again 17 reps? Nothing over five for me.


#3

"I've always started my deadlifts from a standing position and execute reps without touching the weight to the floor"

Resetting form is the way to go most of the time, but reversing direction and trying to get back up without touching the weights to the floor is not such a bad exercise, if your form is solid. Helluva workout, that's for sure.

It'd be hard to keep strict form over 17 reps at any weight, but I've seen it done. I rarely go past 6 on deads. Even speed work!


#4

My first advice to you is to actually try deadlifting from the floor. As Thunder said, you won't have the advantage of the stretch-shortening cycle to assist you with the lift. You'll also develop what is known as "starting strength" when trying to accelerate the weight from the ground. I think you'll also find that you'll be better able to recruit the glutes in the lift. This is essential for strengthening them and preventing anterior pelvic tilt.

This is not to say that you can't ever deadlift of the pins/blocks. Many things can be useful if done less often.


#5

This was a very fucking helpful thread. My dumbass was always hanging them and not touching the ground. From now on I'm gonna do them the way you guys suggest. I never thought of the start point being that important.


#6

You want to set the weight down. The main reason I see is so that you can reset your form.


#7

thanks for the insightful replies.

Once a year I do a 20-rep deadlift routine for about 10-12 weeks.... for the same reasons given for the 20 rep squat routine... it is absolutely brutal in all it's effects. I can maintain good form. Grip strength is always the limiting factor at first... but then gets stronger than hell.


#8

If you're not deadlifting from the floor I wouldn't go as far as to say you can do 20 reps with good form. If you're not pulling from the floor this is not good form.

Secondly, if you're grip is giving out it'd have more to do with endurance than strength right?


#9

Answer: Because it's called a "DEADLIFT" - If you don't pause between reps it ceases to be a DEADLIFT!


#10

Well, sorta... Dimel & RDL's are still called deadlifts.


#11

I only pull singles in the sumo or conventional deadlift.