T Nation

Deadlift Negatives

Do you emphasize them? I usually get the weight up, then basicly drop the weight(well, I slow it down a lot, almost like I am doing a RDL, but not nearly that slow.) I did a search and couldn’t find anything. Any help will be appreciated.

[quote]SeanT wrote:
Do you emphasize them? I usually get the weight up, then basicly drop the weight(well, I slow it down a lot, almost like I am doing a RDL, but not nearly that slow.) I did a search and couldn’t find anything. Any help will be appreciated.[/quote]

That’s not uncommon and there is nothing wrong with it. That’s why bumper plates exist, you could say, although more for oly lifts.

I’m pretty sure that an article here on T-Nation said that the eccentric movement in the DL isn’t as important as with other lifts because it isn’t the same movement as the concentric so dropping the weight is ok.

[quote]amigu wrote:
I’m pretty sure that an article here on T-Nation said that the eccentric movement in the DL isn’t as important as with other lifts because it isn’t the same movement as the concentric so dropping the weight is ok.[/quote]

how is it different from other lifts - i dont see this…

I think in Waterbury’s new book he mentioned that in his experience, almost all dealifting injuries occurred when someone was trying to lower the weight slowly.
If you want the benefits of negatives on your PC, use a different lift.

[quote]
amigu wrote:

how is it different from other lifts - i dont see this…[/quote]

Because when using negatives properly the eccentric should mirror the motion of the concentric. The path of the bar during the concentric of the deadlift cannot be “reversed” in this way. If you are using heavy weight and try to do so you will likely injure yourself.

[quote]evansmi wrote:
I think in Waterbury’s new book he mentioned that in his experience, almost all dealifting injuries occurred when someone was trying to lower the weight slowly. [/quote]

This likely is due to people relax a bit on the slow eccentric and something gives. They are tight and tense pulling the load and if trying t slowly lower lose that and bam injured. get those heavy loads up and put em the hell down lol, safer ways to go for some tut on low back if desired

Phill

Okay, thanks. That means more weight :-). And I also read on T-Nation that I should deadlift at most once a week and less if possible. Is this true?

[quote]SeanT wrote:
Okay, thanks. That means more weight :-). And I also read on T-Nation that I should deadlift at most once a week and less if possible. Is this true?[/quote]

I personally wouldn’t max out more than once a month. If you are going heavy then you lift less and do more supplementals like GHR’s, pull-throughs and RDL’s. If you are going light you can DL almost everyday. I have done so, although it gave me jumpers knee.

U could do negatives, but I wouldn’t do them when ur Very Tired OR when u lift ur Max.

[quote]SeanT wrote:
Okay, thanks. That means more weight :-). And I also read on T-Nation that I should deadlift at most once a week and less if possible. Is this true?[/quote]

Depends on how heavy you are going. Most US powerlifters seem to avoid deadlifting in general. European powerlifters seem much keener to deadlift regularly. Eg in Stefan Korte’s 3x3 program you squat, bench and deadlift 3 times a week. The main reason you can do this is that mostly you are lifting 60% or less of your max, but with high volume (8x5 for squat and deadlift, 8x6 for bench). Another reason is that on this program you only do the 3 powerlifts.

I think, and I could be wrong, that most people use Romanian deadlifts and stiff-legged deadlifts as almost the only deadlift-negative made with strict form. I’m sure there’s benefit to be found using the negative movement in the deadlift, but with weights close to your max I think it’s a little dangerous.