T Nation

Deadlift Lock Out Help


#1

So what are some of the best exercises to increase lock out strength?I usually stall out about 4 inches from lock out and its really pissing me off so what do y'all recommend?


#2

Rack lockouts come to mind.
I feel like ever since I started hitting the rack lockouts there isn’t any DL I can’t finish if I can get it off the floor.


#3

If you’re a desk jockey like me, you probably have some stiffness. I know when I was a student (lots of walking, a little sitting, lots of sleeping =p) I had zero problems at lockout, if I could get it off the ground I could finish it.

After having the same issues as you, I started stretching out my hip flexors and pec muscles to let me engage the glutes more, and let my arms hang closer to my body. I immediately improved my lockout.


#4

some things I did to help is to add some bands in with rack deads, and chain work to deadlifts from the floor


#5

Fix ya ass.


#6

Kroc rows seemed to help Kroc. Try those. Kroc rows is an all out set, heavy as you can handle for 20-40 reps. Just go at it like a beast. If you have access to bands + chains, use them and see how that works for you.


#7

Heavy rack lockouts from the knee for higher rep sets have done wonders for me. (8-15 reps). Kroc Rows are great if you have access to heavy dumbbells (over 100). Building a stronger upper back really is key in the lockout. Even adding more pull-ups/variations into your workout will help, but the first two exercises are great and have worked well for me.


#8

What about power shrugs? I heard that coan uses and recommends these, any of y’all have any success with these?


#9

It could be technique or strength; hard to say without a video.

To build your top end things like rack deadlifts, box squats, pin squats, pulls against chains/bands, pull throughs, etc. will all help.

I would just mix up your accessory work and perhaps even try changing up your stance slightly (direction of toes, width of stance, etc.)


#10

I know it sounds daft but try doing deadlifts while standing on a platform 3-5inch seems to work well. the extended range of movement will improve speed off the bottom while will carry over and help you go right past any sticking points plus it gets you used to straining for longer so if it is abit of a grinder it isnt a shock to the system.

Louie Simmons wrote an article on the westside barbell site about benchers missing weights due to not practising the full range of movement and relying on lockout work. My view is its the same with deadlifts or any exercise for that matter. Yes people get stronger but it doesnt always carry over to the full range of movement.

Accessory work that usualy helps:

Speed pulls, straight weight or against chains or bands

Stiff leg deadlifts

Heavy ab work

Rows for back

grip work

Goodmornings


#11

I’m amazed at how many people just assume you have properly functioning glutes and tell you to incorporate advanced techniques…

If you have poor glute activation, you should definitely address that first before trying all of the advanced techniques that everyone else loves to post. Glute bridges, X-band walks, single-leg hip thrusts, etc. would all probably be helpful. Read “Dispelling the Glute Myth” that just came out this week, if you haven’t already.

Rack pulls are going to do you no good if you can’t activate your glutes in the first place. You have to be honest with yourself.

If you have adequate glute activation and no other massive muscular imbalances or altered force couples, then any lifts with an emphasis on hip extension or hyperextension will probably help your top end - kneeling squats, reverse hypers (if you’re a lucky bastard and have access to one), Romanian deadlifts, and good mornings all come to mind.


#12

read the latest article by Krahn that he interviewed Jim Wendler…they talk about that specifically.