T Nation

Deadlift Grip Help

Does it make a difference in which grip you use when deadlifting?

Depends. If you are doing submaximal lifts, a clean grip (ie knuckles of both hands facing forwards) will usually suffice.

If you are doing a max lift, you will probably need to use either a mixed grip (one hand with knuckles forward, the other with knuckles back) or the hook grip (knuckles forward, fingers overlapping the thumb). If you are doing the former, alternate which hand faces forwards. The hook grip hurts like hell at first, but you get used to it. Put some surgical tape on your thumb to avoid ripping skin off it.

[quote]sharetrader wrote:
If you are doing the former, alternate which hand faces forwards. [/quote]

Great point here. I never gave this much thought until I started pulling heavier weights more frequently. I noticed one of my traps was developing faster than the other, and that I was uncomfortable with using the opposite grip.

Now I do the majority of my deadlifts with my weaker grip, and save my strong grip for my last one or two sets. I’ve also started doing my heavy shrugs with my weak grip to compensate.

I like to do mixed grip and alternate hands each set so I don’t get an imbalance. I use hook grip on O-lifts to secure the weight in my hand from the momentum, but it just feels more comfortable to me on deadlift to use a mixed grip.

[quote]sharetrader wrote:
Depends. If you are doing submaximal lifts, a clean grip (ie knuckles of both hands facing forwards) will usually suffice.

If you are doing a max lift, you will probably need to use either a mixed grip (one hand with knuckles forward, the other with knuckles back) or the hook grip (knuckles forward, fingers overlapping the thumb). If you are doing the former, alternate which hand faces forwards. The hook grip hurts like hell at first, but you get used to it. Put some surgical tape on your thumb to avoid ripping skin off it. [/quote]

Good post, I could never get the hang of it, it hurts like a bitch but I will try the tape. But I hear, the hook grip is the stringest grip of all.

Do you deadlift with a hook grip, or does anyone else deadlift with a hook grip can testify it to being the strongest grip once you get used to it?

Use a mix grip to stop the bar from rolling about due to the physics of reverse torsion. You can also use more weight for that reason.

Another thing to watch is how far apart your hands are on the bar. Generally, the closer they are, the easier the lift becomes, within reason.

[quote]greekdawg wrote:

Do you deadlift with a hook grip, or does anyone else deadlift with a hook grip can testify it to being the strongest grip once you get used to it?[/quote]

used to when I was doing max barbell deadlifts. Now I usually only do maxes with my shrug bar. It has larger than standard size handles, making hook grip impossible for my hand size.

When I was doing max barbell deadlifts, I found the hook grip best for me. I don’t like the unbalanced feeling I get from mixed grip.

I don’t see current top deadlifters using hook grip, but maybe this is because the ones you see videos of are usually in the top weight classes. Maybe grip is not a limiting factor for them. Bob Peoples, who held the outright record for some time with a lift of 729 at around 180 bodyweight, used a hook grip.

try using some chaulk, in combination with an over-under grip, and switch between sets. try using your weaker grip in the heavier sets, and don’t try to “curl” the bar, as you could harm your bicep of the arm thats “under”. if its still slipping, maybe you could try using straps, or perhaps work on your forearm strength.