T Nation

Deadlift Form Check


#1

6'5 about 230lbs

350lbs

Would appreciate any criticism or advice.

Deadliftshttp://youtu.be/x43vWnANoH0


#2

You have literally zero leg drive and your lower back is extremely rounded over ( very bad ). You need to get slightly lower or at least get your lower back in much more neutral position which will bring your hips lower, chest up a little more, and focus on using your legs not your lower back to initiate the movement. You are most likely not very tight in your core either.


#3

[quote]Reed wrote:
You have literally zero leg drive and your lower back is extremely rounded over ( very bad ). You need to get slightly lower or at least get your lower back in much more neutral position which will bring your hips lower, chest up a little more, and focus on using your legs not your lower back to initiate the movement. You are most likely not very tight in your core either.[/quote]

Thanks brother.
Back to the lab tomorrow morning


#4

It all comes from your setup. The biggest issue with the deadlift is setup. It’s a much more technical movement than people realize, one or two inches out from your optimum position can totally mess up the movement. One main positive is your lockout seemed solid. No hyper-extension and your glutes seemed to really fire at the end.

Now I’m assuming you don’t have any flexibility issues with getting into a good deadlift position? If so, as Reed said drop your hips lower. Not as low as people often think, you still want your hips to be a good way higher than your knees, its a deadlift not a squat remember!
Also, try and sit back onto your heels a little more, a good remedy for this is to lose the shoes. Definitely not the right shoes for deadlifting. You need a flat, hard sole that’s as thin as possible. I deadlift with just socks on, but I understand why some people don’t want to do that. The softer the sole, the more force it absorbs when you drive off the floor.
A great video to watch that helped me with my setup is a video by EliteFTS:

Hope it all goes well. Keep lifting.


#5

[quote]JMallon95 wrote:
It all comes from your setup. The biggest issue with the deadlift is setup. It’s a much more technical movement than people realize, one or two inches out from your optimum position can totally mess up the movement. One main positive is your lockout seemed solid. No hyper-extension and your glutes seemed to really fire at the end.

Now I’m assuming you don’t have any flexibility issues with getting into a good deadlift position? If so, as Reed said drop your hips lower. Not as low as people often think, you still want your hips to be a good way higher than your knees, its a deadlift not a squat remember!
Also, try and sit back onto your heels a little more, a good remedy for this is to lose the shoes. Definitely not the right shoes for deadlifting. You need a flat, hard sole that’s as thin as possible. I deadlift with just socks on, but I understand why some people don’t want to do that. The softer the sole, the more force it absorbs when you drive off the floor.
A great video to watch that helped me with my setup is a video by EliteFTS:

Hope it all goes well. Keep lifting.[/quote]

Thanks for reply, I actually worked a couple sets this morning.
I was trying to focus on incorporating some leg drive and keeping my back straighter.
One thing I noticed is my neck position greatly alters my back, so I gotta work on that. Please let me know what you think.


#6

Raise your hips a little more, keep your shins vertical, get your head position neutral, learn how to get really tight in your lower AND upper back (bellyful of air and crush an orange in your armpits) before pulling, start the pull by raising your chest and ditch the Romaleos (I used to wear them for DL, put 10 lbs on my max by going to flats).

Other than that it isn’t looking too bad at all, and a good improvement on your first video.


#7

Looks a lot better on that video mate. As MarkKO said, raising your hips will help. You seem quad-dominant considering your lock your legs out/your hips rise first. Raising your hips will force you to rely on your glutes, hamstrings and lower back a bit more.

As will keeping your shins vertical.
This might mean you have to work on your hamstring flexibility (depending on how good it is).
With regards to your head position, I used to have the exact same problem and it’s a commonly misused queue. Keep your head neutral (imagine from the top of your head down to your pelvis as one straight bar). As soon as the bar gets to your knees, that when you can start lifting your head up towards the ceiling. It helps shift your body weight backwards and helps lockout.

Hope everything goes well.
As MarkKO said, huge improvement well done.