T Nation

Deadlift Form Check


#1

Hi guys,
Here are a few vids. I'm wondering what I should be focusing on in terms of improving my form. From what I can tell I need to make sure that my shoulders are rising at the same speed as my hips at the beginning of the movement. I think I need to strengthen my erectors so I've included some seated good mornings as a post-deadlift support exercise, along side GHRs. Any pointers are appreciated, thanks.

DL 150x7


#2

Deadlift 170x5. Sorry about the guy talking at the beginning, he wouldn't shutup so the lift starts at about 1:05 in (I was wrapped to the bar waiting for him to shut it). Thanks for your input guys. Form definitely starts to slip on rep 4 and 5.


#3

Last one, 170kg x 3, I put the belt on to try to help me feel better form/tightness in the core (as I noted it was slipping in the previous set).


#4

your hips rise too fast at the begining, losing all of your leg drive. also your lower back is rounding.
focus on pushing though with your hips like a thrust and pulling the bar back. keep everything (ass to traps) moving at the same time


#5

Thanks man, you're definitely right - I think I need to work my hip mobility a bit more as well so I can get lower and drive up harder/further through the legs.


#6

This.

Try sitting back a little more too. Good to see you without shoes. Maybe try curling your toes up. This will force you keep your weight back.

Also, how much contact does the bar have with your shins? I have seen some beginners deadlift, similar to how you are doing it, by locking out their knees early to keep the bar from scraping their shins or knees.


#7

I gash my shins open most days I deadlift to be fair, but I think I do need to sit back more - I do curl my toes up as much as possible but defo need to keep it in mind to really get that heel drive going. Thanks for the tips - just gotta wait to try again!

I think wearing shorts was a bit mistake as well, because knowing that I would gash my shins up I probably tried to avoid it and by doing so kept the bar path too far away from me, really gotta get sitting back more looking at those vids again.


#8

I'd say if you need straps to hold onto a 150 lbs barbell you are in serious need of grip strength training.


#9

im pretty sure its in kg


#10

You are correct. My mistake. I hate the metric system.


#11

Your lower back is rounding a lot. Most likely due to tight hamstrings/glutes. My prescription is static stretching every day, and active stretching before DL. I struggled with the same thing, and since being able to DL properly, not only is it more comfortable but my poundages went up a lot.

If you can't sit on the floor with your back straight, your legs straight in front of you, then that's a posterior chain tightness problem.


#12

kudos to haveiron... if you are having to strap at around 315 lbs or 150 kg whatever you need to drop the
reps you are doing and just do more sets but without straps...cant expect to really claim what you need
equipments help to lift...lower reps..more sets so you keep volume and work the forearms..grip n rip...raw dog every time...


#13

This seems to pretty much hit it. The first thing I noticed were the hips rising first. Second were the back rounding and the looking up at the beginning of each rep. Forms not bad but could use a little work. Some remedies that helped me(all things I mentioned were aspects of the lift that I struggled with):

-For the hips: I always do overhead split squats with both feet elevated before any squat or DL session as they really help to open up my hips. I hang in the bottom position for a count or two, tightening my glutes as much as I can as I reach for the ceiling, thinking about lifting from the rib cage. You should really feel the stretch in the hip flexors at that point.
-One thing to think about as you begin the movement up to when the bar reaches the knees is to imagine pushing the floor away from you. This really helped me to maintain a very tight back position and helped my legs to get more involved(hips and shoulders rising at same speed). It's surprising sometimes.
-Do you have mirrors in your gym? They are very hard to avoid but tend to make the lifter want to look up before each rep. I find that tucking my chin towards my neck and looking at the floor about 4 feet in front of me helps to maintain a much sturdier back position.
-Grip strength always helps. Nothing much to recommend, but I really like static holds for grip strength. I would either just do plate holds for duration(mentally exhausting too) or heavy holds with a barbell holding it in the top of a shrug position for as long as possible.

Hope some of this helps. Love the deadlift. The one movement where all you have to say is "Pick that up." Best of lifting.


#14

This seems to pretty much hit it. The first thing I noticed were the hips rising first. Second were the back rounding and the looking up at the beginning of each rep. Forms not bad but could use a little work. Some remedies that helped me(all things I mentioned were aspects of the lift that I struggled with):

-For the hips: I always do overhead split squats with both feet elevated before any squat or DL session as they really help to open up my hips. I hang in the bottom position for a count or two, tightening my glutes as much as I can as I reach for the ceiling, thinking about lifting from the rib cage. You should really feel the stretch in the hip flexors at that point.
-One thing to think about as you begin the movement up to when the bar reaches the knees is to imagine pushing the floor away from you. This really helped me to maintain a very tight back position and helped my legs to get more involved(hips and shoulders rising at same speed). It's surprising sometimes.
-Do you have mirrors in your gym? They are very hard to avoid but tend to make the lifter want to look up before each rep. I find that tucking my chin towards my neck and looking at the floor about 4 feet in front of me helps to maintain a much sturdier back position.
-Grip strength always helps. Nothing much to recommend, but I really like static holds for grip strength. I would either just do plate holds for duration(mentally exhausting too) or heavy holds with a barbell holding it in the top of a shrug position for as long as possible.

Hope some of this helps. Love the deadlift. The one movement where all you have to say is "Pick that up." Best of lifting.


#15

Rookie mistake, posted twice, don't know how to delete posts.


#16

damn rookies


#17

This is not really the best advice. If the OP isn't planning on competing in a powerlifting meet and is building an impressive physique/getting to his goals using straps, then who cares?

OP, fix your form using the tips you've already gotten so far. If using straps is helping you get to your goals then keep using them.


#18

Greg ....good point...I wasn't really thinkin power lifting exclusive...
Given...people have diff views on physique but wouldn't it still make more
Sense to build forearms as well...not many incorp forearm training...
Call me wrong for the comment but I still think buildiing a good physique
Includes forearms and if for strength its important as well...good point tho


#19

I completely agree that having good forearms is part of built physique but DL's aren't a forearm exercise.. They work your grip but so does a lot of other exercises. If the OP has small forearms he should hit them directly. He shouldn't let a limited grip strength hold him back on back exercises if hecan avoid it.


#20

That statment I agree completely with...my guess was he doesn't train them specific and he may do so...
Never asked...but def never let a minor group hold up a major from growing...would have been better
For me to say I wouldn't use straps til absolutley needed and would then would train them specifically
Static holds....wrist curls...door way pull ups etc....good call on the post greg