T Nation

Deadlift: Dropping the Weight?


#1

Was wondering whats better when Deadlifting or whats proper...I workout at home so i guess ive always been used to doing a slow eccentric on the deadlift but should i really be just dropping the weight instead?


#2

Below the knee is where it can become a danger to the lower back with shear forces wanting to do bad, bad things to your discs. Control it to the knee, take advantage of that eccentric, then drop (again, under control) from the knee to the floor.


#3

I think he means dropping it… like lift it… lock out. Drop it. Repeat… instead of lowering …just let it go completely. .


#4

[quote]hailmary5150 wrote:
ive always been used to doing a slow eccentric on the deadlift[/quote]
I generally wouldn’t suggest anything resembling a “slow” eccentric on deads. Controlled, sure, but “slow”? Not really.

Whether you should drop it or not depends a bit on how you’re doing them (sets and reps) and why you’re doing them (your goal). Generally speaking, if you’re pulling multiple reps in a set, you can treat them like a series singles no matter how many reps you’re doing - take a brief rest between each rep to reset stance, grip, and posture - or you can do them ‘touch and go’ lightly tapping the plates on the floor before immediately starting the next rep.

Some examples of different methods:


Fast, controlled descent and a very brief pause between reps.


Slightly slower descent than Kroc’s, but still not what I’d call a “slow negative”, with touch and go reps.


Even slower descent and slower pull, with touch and go reps.


#5

I definitely advocate touch and go reps for deads. I attribute my success with the deadlift to that training style, along with my back growth. I spent years training dead stop/dropped deads because “the eccentric was useless/dangerous” in the dead, but once I controlled the eccentric and stopped pulling all my reps from a dead stop, I busted a bunch of plateaus.


#6

[quote]hailmary5150 wrote:
Was wondering whats better when Deadlifting or whats proper…I workout at home so i guess ive always been used to doing a slow eccentric on the deadlift but should i really be just dropping the weight instead?[/quote]

How strong is your floor?


#7

If you’ve been doing slow I definitely would not try to make it faster on purpose. For reps I like the Wendler speed, if your doing a 1RM it might go down faster but you don’t have to drop it on purpose. Here is another one showing it doesn’t have to be dropped just because its heavy.


#8

[quote]barbedwired wrote:
I think he means dropping it… like lift it… lock out. Drop it. Repeat… instead of lowering …just let it go completely. .[/quote]

I understand that is what he probably means, I was offering what I felt was a better way. What I described should look just like those touch and go videos, whether you hit a set or a single. I just wanted to explain which part of the ROM you may or may not want to focus on. You wouldn’t find me holding a heavy loaded bar below my knees for any amount of time, but above? Definitely.


#9

I think actual performance is also going to differ depending on your specific goals. There are plenty of powerlifters at my gym, and when they’re handling seriously heavy poundages, once they’ve gotten the weight up, no way are they going to risk injury slowly bringing the bar down for fear of scuffing the floor. Of course they have some solid rubber padding on the floor, and for the most part, most of the competitive guys aren’t out to make as much noise as they can and turn every head in the gym every time they drop the bar (as some newbies or even wannabes may be prone to do).

On the other hand, if you watch the old scene from Blood n Guts where Dorian Yates is doing deadlifts (solely for hypertrophy), he avoids the potentially dangerous lower portion of the ROM, and maintains a fairly controlled cadence with his repetitions. This is the same MO he maintained with any other exercise for any other bodypart: continuous tension, explosive concentric, controlled eccentric.

I’m not saying that everyone falls neatly into these two approaches, but hopefully you can see what I’m getting at here.

S


#10

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#11

[quote]pushharder wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I definitely advocate touch and go reps for deads. I attribute my success with the deadlift to that training style, along with my back growth. I spent years training dead stop/dropped deads because “the eccentric was useless/dangerous” in the dead, but once I controlled the eccentric and stopped pulling all my reps from a dead stop, I busted a bunch of plateaus.[/quote]

I can understand this. It has everything to do with what Stu said:

For this reason I’ve always done my RDL’s this way. But not regular deads; I reset on those because I’m mainly training the lift.

Consequently I think I’ve gotten more hypertrophy from the RDL’s.[/quote]

I agree with Push. If you’re looking to increase your poundage on your lift, then train the movement. If you’re looking for hypertrophy, you can’t go wrong with TuT, controlling the weight, etc. Train the muscles involved. I also agree that the RDL is better for this, as I feel it recruits the hamstrings, lower back, etc. more. I think SteelNation even said he prefers those, and they haven’t failed him yet.


#12

[quote]J. Prufrock wrote:

[quote]pushharder wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I definitely advocate touch and go reps for deads. I attribute my success with the deadlift to that training style, along with my back growth. I spent years training dead stop/dropped deads because “the eccentric was useless/dangerous” in the dead, but once I controlled the eccentric and stopped pulling all my reps from a dead stop, I busted a bunch of plateaus.[/quote]

I can understand this. It has everything to do with what Stu said:

For this reason I’ve always done my RDL’s this way. But not regular deads; I reset on those because I’m mainly training the lift.

Consequently I think I’ve gotten more hypertrophy from the RDL’s.[/quote]

I agree with Push. If you’re looking to increase your poundage on your lift, then train the movement. If you’re looking for hypertrophy, you can’t go wrong with TuT, controlling the weight, etc. Train the muscles involved. I also agree that the RDL is better for this, as I feel it recruits the hamstrings, lower back, etc. more. I think SteelNation even said he prefers those, and they haven’t failed him yet.[/quote]

I have substantially increased the poundage of my lift by training with a focus of TuT and controlling the weight. I never train the lift, except for the first rep of a set of touch and go deads.