T Nation

Dead-Squat Launch Technique

@CT: When doing a rep do you count it as long as your hips (no arm pull or shrugging) if the DS bar gets to your navel or do you stop as soon as a set feels different (not as fast, but you can still get it to the navel with your hips)? Thank you very much as I’m trying to fine tube auto regulation for best long-term results.

[quote]sput79 wrote:
@CT: When doing a rep do you count it as long as your hips (no arm pull or shrugging) if the DS bar gets to your navel or do you stop as soon as a set feels different (not as fast, but you can still get it to the navel with your hips)? Thank you very much as I’m trying to fine tube auto regulation for best long-term results.[/quote]

I prefer to focus on feeling and explosivness, not height. If a rep doesn’t feel as explosive or solid, stop.

Thank you CT perfect!

I don’t wanna high jack the thread but I also had a question about the movement and this seemed like a decent place to ask. When the bar is on the way down from the “lift off” is there something we should do to protect the spine from a gravity pulling the weight down? I’ve read that some believe spinal compression to be a huge component of cns stress and it would seem that “catching” the bar at the bottom of a dead squat launch would be stressful on the discs. Or am I worrying too much?

[quote]cmryan_21 wrote:
I don’t wanna high jack the thread but I also had a question about the movement and this seemed like a decent place to ask. When the bar is on the way down from the “lift off” is there something we should do to protect the spine from a gravity pulling the weight down? I’ve read that some believe spinal compression to be a huge component of cns stress and it would seem that “catching” the bar at the bottom of a dead squat launch would be stressful on the discs. Or am I worrying too much?[/quote]

Well, if that were true, nobody would be able to play basketball or volleyball more than once a month… landing from a jump is at least as stressful when it comes to spinal compression. And all those olympic lifters whp do lifts from the hang would also be in trouble.

In fact I found that the lowering/catch is actually the most powerful portion of the exercise when it comes to building muscle mass.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]cmryan_21 wrote:
I don’t wanna high jack the thread but I also had a question about the movement and this seemed like a decent place to ask. When the bar is on the way down from the “lift off” is there something we should do to protect the spine from a gravity pulling the weight down? I’ve read that some believe spinal compression to be a huge component of cns stress and it would seem that “catching” the bar at the bottom of a dead squat launch would be stressful on the discs. Or am I worrying too much?[/quote]

Well, if that were true, nobody would be able to play basketball or volleyball more than once a month… landing from a jump is at least as stressful when it comes to spinal compression. And all those olympic lifters whp do lifts from the hang would also be in trouble.

In fact I found that the lowering/catch is actually the most powerful portion of the exercise when it comes to building muscle mass.[/quote]
I guess I was under the impression that catching a fairly heavy deadlift would be more stressful than catching OL, but I take your point. I definitely did not realize that unweighted jumps put that much pressure on the discs. It does make sense that the catch would provide a substantial stimulus to the upper body. Thank you for clearing up my unfounded concerns, but i should have realized i was worrying too much. Ever since my surgery a couple years ago I’m overly cautious with heavy lower body lifts to the point that it’s probably detrimental to my overall progress.

[quote]cmryan_21 wrote:
I guess I was under the impression that catching a fairly heavy deadlift would be more stressful than catching OL, but I take your point. I definitely did not realize that unweighted jumps put that much pressure on the discs. It does make sense that the catch would provide a substantial stimulus to the upper body. Thank you for clearing up my unfounded concerns, but i should have realized i was worrying too much. Ever since my surgery a couple years ago I’m overly cautious with heavy lower body lifts to the point that it’s probably detrimental to my overall progress.[/quote]

Do not forget that for the Dead-Squat launches, you do not use near your max deadlift weight… normally about 70% is used, 80% for those who are very explosive. And the catch is done with a centered weight, not with the bar being forward (axial loading)