T Nation

CT, Your Deadlifting Progression?


#1

CT
Love doing the big lifts, and deadlifting is one of the ones I hope to keep improving, however the split I do (upper/lower) taxes the posterior chain quite a lot. Every now and then there are spikes in strength gains but they don't last and sometimes regress, I.e. 180kg for 5 triples one week reduced to not even a single the next week because of a painful lower back

I was wondering what progression model you use for deadlifting? One that helps maintain back health? Reading up on the high pull article you said the normal deadlift improved after focussing on these, I include them but only as assistance work.
Thanks in advance


#2

I also have something to ask about deadlifts, so might as well write here instead of opening a new topic. I have just started the Power Look program and trained Squat and Bench so far. My next workout is the deadlift and the problem is I have a herniated disc in my lower back. According to doctor it is structural, comes from birth and I don’t need to go under a surgery. I don’t have problems with Squats, but heavy conventional deads kill me and this problem also affects my mobility, so I am not sure if I would be able to do deficit deadlifts as well. I suppose trap bar would be more pain free so can I switch conventional to trap bar, and in case there is a problem with deficits, is there a way to solve it ? Thank you for your time sir.


#3

Do you have a video of your deadlift? A sore back after deadlifting is one thing but if your back is so sore the next week that you can’t complete the lift it could be a form issue. Not taking anything away from your lifts or saying form is definitely the problem, would just like to see it.


#4

[quote]erenasena wrote:
I also have something to ask about deadlifts, so might as well write here instead of opening a new topic. I have just started the Power Look program and trained Squat and Bench so far. My next workout is the deadlift and the problem is I have a herniated disc in my lower back. According to doctor it is structural, comes from birth and I don’t need to go under a surgery. I don’t have problems with Squats, but heavy conventional deads kill me and this problem also affects my mobility, so I am not sure if I would be able to do deficit deadlifts as well. I suppose trap bar would be more pain free so can I switch conventional to trap bar, and in case there is a problem with deficits, is there a way to solve it ? Thank you for your time sir.[/quote]

You can switch to trap bar or sumo to see if they feel better. If the sumo feel better you can switch to them as the main movement and use Sumo variations instead of conventional variations for the assistance work.


#5

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]erenasena wrote:
I also have something to ask about deadlifts, so might as well write here instead of opening a new topic. I have just started the Power Look program and trained Squat and Bench so far. My next workout is the deadlift and the problem is I have a herniated disc in my lower back. According to doctor it is structural, comes from birth and I don’t need to go under a surgery. I don’t have problems with Squats, but heavy conventional deads kill me and this problem also affects my mobility, so I am not sure if I would be able to do deficit deadlifts as well. I suppose trap bar would be more pain free so can I switch conventional to trap bar, and in case there is a problem with deficits, is there a way to solve it ? Thank you for your time sir.[/quote]

You can switch to trap bar or sumo to see if they feel better. If the sumo feel better you can switch to them as the main movement and use Sumo variations instead of conventional variations for the assistance work.[/quote]

Thank you coach. So I switched to trap bar as my main movement and was able to go heavy with no problem, and happily I was able to do deficits, I think because they were for higher reps. I really tried to keep perfect form with them and not to raise my hips at the beginning, which led me to use very modest weights. Is it normal to have such a decline in weights with deficits after the heavy work, or is there a ratio I should try to preserve ? Thank you for your time.


#6

[quote]erenasena wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]erenasena wrote:
I also have something to ask about deadlifts, so might as well write here instead of opening a new topic. I have just started the Power Look program and trained Squat and Bench so far. My next workout is the deadlift and the problem is I have a herniated disc in my lower back. According to doctor it is structural, comes from birth and I don’t need to go under a surgery. I don’t have problems with Squats, but heavy conventional deads kill me and this problem also affects my mobility, so I am not sure if I would be able to do deficit deadlifts as well. I suppose trap bar would be more pain free so can I switch conventional to trap bar, and in case there is a problem with deficits, is there a way to solve it ? Thank you for your time sir.[/quote]

You can switch to trap bar or sumo to see if they feel better. If the sumo feel better you can switch to them as the main movement and use Sumo variations instead of conventional variations for the assistance work.[/quote]

Thank you coach. So I switched to trap bar as my main movement and was able to go heavy with no problem, and happily I was able to do deficits, I think because they were for higher reps. I really tried to keep perfect form with them and not to raise my hips at the beginning, which led me to use very modest weights. Is it normal to have such a decline in weights with deficits after the heavy work, or is there a ratio I should try to preserve ? Thank you for your time. [/quote]

Deficit on trap bar are a quads killer if you keep your hips low. It’s not unusual for performance to drop since you can’t compensate with the lower back… It will get better over time as your legs will get stronger and better at handling the workload.


#7

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]erenasena wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]erenasena wrote:
I also have something to ask about deadlifts, so might as well write here instead of opening a new topic. I have just started the Power Look program and trained Squat and Bench so far. My next workout is the deadlift and the problem is I have a herniated disc in my lower back. According to doctor it is structural, comes from birth and I don’t need to go under a surgery. I don’t have problems with Squats, but heavy conventional deads kill me and this problem also affects my mobility, so I am not sure if I would be able to do deficit deadlifts as well. I suppose trap bar would be more pain free so can I switch conventional to trap bar, and in case there is a problem with deficits, is there a way to solve it ? Thank you for your time sir.[/quote]

You can switch to trap bar or sumo to see if they feel better. If the sumo feel better you can switch to them as the main movement and use Sumo variations instead of conventional variations for the assistance work.[/quote]

Thank you coach. So I switched to trap bar as my main movement and was able to go heavy with no problem, and happily I was able to do deficits, I think because they were for higher reps. I really tried to keep perfect form with them and not to raise my hips at the beginning, which led me to use very modest weights. Is it normal to have such a decline in weights with deficits after the heavy work, or is there a ratio I should try to preserve ? Thank you for your time. [/quote]

Deficit on trap bar are a quads killer if you keep your hips low. It’s not unusual for performance to drop since you can’t compensate with the lower back… It will get better over time as your legs will get stronger and better at handling the workload.[/quote]

Actually I was able to do them normally like it was written in the program and not on trap bar. I only switched conventional deadlifts to trap bar. Anyway deficits felt so good, I felt my lower back working incredibly and it didn’t cause pain. Is it normal for weights to decrease substantially when doing normal deficit deadlifts without the trap bar as well ? Thank you for your help.


#8

The differences in the conventional deadlift and the sumo deadlift, my understanding is the sumo deadlift is more hamstring based, but for me the sumo deadlift is much more comfortable on everything, but if I used this as my main exercise would I be missing out of aspects you’d hit using conventional? I don’t have access to a trap bar otherwise this would be the first choice, but I fear if I drop the conventional style I’d be missing out, would you say the sumo is still a valid substitute?
Thanks


#9

[quote]Jake Graves wrote:
The differences in the conventional deadlift and the sumo deadlift, my understanding is the sumo deadlift is more hamstring based, but for me the sumo deadlift is much more comfortable on everything, but if I used this as my main exercise would I be missing out of aspects you’d hit using conventional? I don’t have access to a trap bar otherwise this would be the first choice, but I fear if I drop the conventional style I’d be missing out, would you say the sumo is still a valid substitute?
Thanks [/quote]

Nah you are fine. Pick the deadlift style that best suits you. You have front squats and squats for the rest of the lower body.


#10

@CT do you ever get your clients to drop their hips low during the sumo deadlift to stretch the glute more? I


#11

[quote]nickj_777 wrote:
@CT do you ever get your clients to drop their hips low during the sumo deadlift to stretch the glute more? I
[/quote]

No, that would put most of them (all of them excerpt those with very long limbs) in a bad mechanical position to do the lift properly.