T Nation

CT Prime Time

Ct, Currently I weigh 184 and I’m 6’0 with I’d say probably 10% body fat. For the past 6 monthes I didn’t work out too seriously but now that I’m broken up with my girlfriend I’m ready to start again. I’m looking to bulk up without putting on too much fat. Right now I’m doing the Optimized Volume Training routine and loving it. I was just making sure if this one would be the best for me, and if not if you could suggest anything else. Also, should I just disregard the tempos on that plan, as has been suggested for all workouts recently on t-nation.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
By all means do focus on hypertrophy for a period of 8 weeks.

I suggest 4 weeks of “total hypertrophy” training (working mostly in the 8-10 and 10-12 reps ranges) followed by 4 weeks of “functional hypertrophy” (working in the 6-8 and 8-10 reps ranges).

Then take an easy week and move back to limit strength & power training.

This is the approach I use with most of my athletes:

BLOCK 1 - Hypertrophy accumulation
Reps ranges: 8-10 and 10-12
Special techniques: supersets, drop sets, post-fatigue, tempo contrast, iso dynamic contrast

BLOCK 2 - Hypertrophy intensification
Reps ranges: 6-8 and 8-10
Special techniques: extended sets, drop sets, post-fatigue

BLOCK 3 - Limit strength
Reps ranges: 4-6 and some work in the 1-3 range
Special techniques: rest/pause, cluster, 2/1 technique

BLOCK 4 - Relative strength
Reps range: 1-3 and power work
Special techniques: cluster, eccentric overload, plyo, olympic lifts, balistic lifts.

IHateGymMorons wrote:
CT,
I don’t have access to bands or chains right now (don’t ask why) and have pretty much maxed out my progress with traditional strength training protocols (low reps and heavy weights). If I was following a true periodized program I would’ve definitely been done with the strength cycle weeks ago.

With that in mind ,would a more traditional “hypertrophy” approach be the next logical step to increasing my strenth gains and eventual size? My reasoning is that more fiber CSA leads to increased force output. I can “hypertrophy train” for 6-8 weeks and then go back to some lower rep protocols to train strength again… hopefully be stronger eventually too.

What do you think is the next logical step to becoming a badder, stronger, more lethal human weapon?

My other idea is to incorporate a “hypertrophy” day and “strength” day in the same week, or simply alternate week by week. Never tried this though, so I don’t have personal experience with it.

[/quote]

The approach that you use w/ your athletes, (as you stated above) wouldn’t that be linear periodization since you are dropping reps and increasing the intesnsity each block? I thought u, and most strength coaches now days, stay away from this type of periodization.?. Maybe I’m missing somin’ here?

Thanks,

Danny

Hey CT–

Do you have any experience dealing with altitude sickness and lifting?

Malinda

I guess it’s linear within the hypertrophy cycle.

Have you ever heard of an incline-decline track for sprinters and should universities and pro-clubs build these? How effective are they?
Brandon Green

From what i understand the Soviets were heavy into throwing and catching the kettlebell and that was the “real” value of kb’s for lifters.Had any experience with this?
Brandon Green

What do you think of the parachute?
Brandon Green

Ever heard of short term high dose protien and/or vitiman c protocols?
Brandon Green

Have you used a mechanical massage wand and what do you think of them?
Brandon Green

They work well. You can do overspeed training with the decline. It’s quite convenient if the facility has that resource built in.

CT,
Is DaFreak going to use any type of fat cutting agent like HOT-ROX?? Or just rely on diet.

[quote]IHateGymMorons wrote:
They work well. You can do overspeed training with the decline. It’s quite convenient if the facility has that resource built in.[/quote]
Where did you find such a track?
Brandon Green

Machines indeed have their place in a bodybuilding routine mostly because of metabolite accumulation: when you perform bodybuilding/hypertrophy training your muscles become pumped and more acid, two conditions that decreae muscle control. At the end of a workout, when the muscles are tired from the high volume or worked, all swelled up and acidic, machines can be safer and more effective than free weights. But that only applies for the last 1-2 exercises of a workout.

Then, you also have some techniques which are easier to perform on machines or cables: iso-dynamic contrast, drop sets, etc.

So machines have their place, but only as assistance work.

[quote]Bauer97 wrote:
Hey Thib,

Thanks for taking the time tonight.

Okay, I stick exclusively to free weight movements, besides a few cable movements. Yet for bodybuilding purposes, I always hear that while they’re not to be emphasized, machines “have their place”.

Where exactly do you think their place is in a program geared toward hypertrophy, and why exactly would they be better than an additional free weight movement?[/quote]

The Air Force Academy has one. They’ve got a sweet facility. My NSCA journal from a few months ago actually ran a piece on it and used as an example for designing facilities.

It’s not linear because there is variation during each block and some form of conjugate work can be applied (e.g. performing maintenance strength work during an hypertrophy cycle).

[quote]Dboy wrote:
Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
By all means do focus on hypertrophy for a period of 8 weeks.

I suggest 4 weeks of “total hypertrophy” training (working mostly in the 8-10 and 10-12 reps ranges) followed by 4 weeks of “functional hypertrophy” (working in the 6-8 and 8-10 reps ranges).

Then take an easy week and move back to limit strength & power training.

This is the approach I use with most of my athletes:

BLOCK 1 - Hypertrophy accumulation
Reps ranges: 8-10 and 10-12
Special techniques: supersets, drop sets, post-fatigue, tempo contrast, iso dynamic contrast

BLOCK 2 - Hypertrophy intensification
Reps ranges: 6-8 and 8-10
Special techniques: extended sets, drop sets, post-fatigue

BLOCK 3 - Limit strength
Reps ranges: 4-6 and some work in the 1-3 range
Special techniques: rest/pause, cluster, 2/1 technique

BLOCK 4 - Relative strength
Reps range: 1-3 and power work
Special techniques: cluster, eccentric overload, plyo, olympic lifts, balistic lifts.

IHateGymMorons wrote:
CT,
I don’t have access to bands or chains right now (don’t ask why) and have pretty much maxed out my progress with traditional strength training protocols (low reps and heavy weights). If I was following a true periodized program I would’ve definitely been done with the strength cycle weeks ago.

With that in mind ,would a more traditional “hypertrophy” approach be the next logical step to increasing my strenth gains and eventual size? My reasoning is that more fiber CSA leads to increased force output. I can “hypertrophy train” for 6-8 weeks and then go back to some lower rep protocols to train strength again… hopefully be stronger eventually too.

What do you think is the next logical step to becoming a badder, stronger, more lethal human weapon?

My other idea is to incorporate a “hypertrophy” day and “strength” day in the same week, or simply alternate week by week. Never tried this though, so I don’t have personal experience with it.

The approach that you use w/ your athletes, (as you stated above) wouldn’t that be linear periodization since you are dropping reps and increasing the intesnsity each block? I thought u, and most strength coaches now days, stay away from this type of periodization.?. Maybe I’m missing somin’ here?

Thanks,

Danny
[/quote]

[quote]cccp21 wrote:
Have you ever heard of an incline-decline track for sprinters and should universities and pro-clubs build these? How effective are they?
Brandon Green[/quote]

Russians used to build those … actually they had tracks with an hydraulic mechanism that allowed them to change the incline of the track.

Decline running is a form of overspeed training. Basically running slightly downhill forces you to increase stride frequency to avoid falling face forward on the floor. This could teach the body to increase its rate of work while sprinting. However the decline must not be such that running mechanics are altered. Normally the decline should not provide more than a 10% gain in speed.

[quote]cccp21 wrote:
What do you think of the parachute?
Brandon Green[/quote]

Can be used with indoors sprinting. I don’t like it that much outdoors though. It can increase stride length and force output during a sprint, which will translate to more acceleration. However the athlete must be careful to maintain proper running mechanics.

Such a technique shouldn’t be used too often either: if it can increase stride length and power, it can also mess up your timing and technique.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
cccp21 wrote:
Have you ever heard of an incline-decline track for sprinters and should universities and pro-clubs build these? How effective are they?
Brandon Green

Russians used to build those … actually they had tracks with an hydraulic mechanism that allowed them to change the incline of the track.

Decline running is a form of overspeed training. Basically running slightly downhill forces you to increase stride frequency to avoid falling face forward on the floor. This could teach the body to increase its rate of work while sprinting. However the decline must not be such that running mechanics are altered. Normally the decline should not provide more than a 10% gain in speed.[/quote]
Thank you! Great reply.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
cccp21 wrote:
What do you think of the parachute?
Brandon Green

Can be used with indoors sprinting. I don’t like it that much outdoors though. It can increase stride length and force output during a sprint, which will translate to more acceleration. However the athlete must be careful to maintain proper running mechanics.

Such a technique shouldn’t be used too often either: if it can increase stride length and power, it can also mess up your timing and technique. [/quote]
Wasn’t suppossed to affect technique but looks like the Soviets screwed up there.
Brandon Green

Do you use flexibility training with weights at the end of a training session and how many times a week should one use it?
Brandon Green