T Nation

CT Prime Time Sept 13 & 14

Well, you could use my deadlift for stubs program in the archives. The average gain on it is around 50lbs in 8 weeks. That would be a good starting point to achieve your goal.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:
Ok, I suppose this is a separate question. I have recently discovered that one of my buddies has passed me in the deadlift. This sucks, considering I taught him about good mornings, proper form, max/dynamic efforts, and overhead squats, etc, etc. I intend to fix the problem.

So, if you had 6 days to work out, and an “impossible goal” to achieve with everything else non-existant (save health), how would you do it?

Let’s say, increase the DL by 100lb by New Years. Ok, that’s a bit out there, how about 150lb by June? With minimal weight gain.

Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate your earlier help on the functional 6 day/week program a great deal, and I still plan do keep at that, but first I’m bound and determined to catch him and pass him now. All the stops are out.[/quote]

See thats the weird thing, i never feel drained after heavy sets, even if i do 10x3. I only feel drained after high reps, and find it hard to complete without dropping down the intensity to really low, like around 60% for doing sets of 10 reps.

I am currently training to maintain size and strength while cutting fat and getting back into general athletic shape. My routine isn’t set in stone, just three full body workouts a week, each with a major push, pull, and lower body lift with some assistance work thrown in. I usually work up to a max or near max triple on the first day, and a max or near max five on the last day. In between, I spend a day concentrating on preserving mass, rehabing, etc., mostly bodybuilding style work. My question (finally) concerns high rep squats. Since I’m more interested in keeping my knees healthy than adding mass to my legs (they’re already large), how would I use high rep squats on my second day while on a restricted calorie diet? Is there anything better for what I’m looking for?

Thanks in advance for your help.

I feel that energy system work is not necessary if you want to loose fat (I do think that it’s necessary to get ripped though). Simply drastically reducing your carbs intake will help you loose fat without having to do “cardio”. You should also strive to increase training density by reducing rest intervals (as long as you don’t have to decrease the weight you are using).

You can perform some low intensity ESW like taking a long walk (60-90 minutes) every day. This would help you increase caloric expenditure by close to 2000-2400kcals/week so it would provide for an additional body fat loss of 3lbs/month.

[quote]cal wrote:
Hi CT,

I have just finished my rugby season recently and am just shedding some bodyfat before I begin adding some muscle in the off season. The thing is I’m sick of running and various forms of cardio. I was just curious how important you feel ESW or cardio is when trying to lose fat??? Can you suggest any ideas on training/diet that would not require cardio sessions? I’m currently around 12%.[/quote]

[quote]binford wrote:
See thats the weird thing, i never feel drained after heavy sets, even if i do 10x3. I only feel drained after high reps, and find it hard to complete without dropping down the intensity to really low, like around 60% for doing sets of 10 reps.[/quote]

That’s because heavy, low reps work is not metabolically draining. It’s only hard on the CNS. What I meant was that even the last sets should be completed without loosing proper form.

During the off season they perform mostly 200m, 400 runs and loaded (45-70lbs sled) 100m runs as these tap into the same energy system as a shift on the ice.

They do perform a basic low intensity workout (70% max HRT for 30-45 minutes, either on the threadmill, stationary bike or roller blades).

As for your split … I’d recommend:

Monday: practice (PM)
Tuesday: Whole body strength and size
Wednesday: practice (PM)
Thursday: OFF
Friday: Lower body strength and power
Saturday: Upper body strength and power
Sunday: OFF

[quote]bigTR wrote:
CT,
I think I have read that you are currently training or have trained hockey players in the past. I was wondering what kind of endurance training you do with them. Also do you have any suggestions for a training split for a defenseman practicing monday and wednesday, consisting mostly of scrimmage and 2 vs 2 type drills. Thanks,
TR[/quote]

CT,
Thanks for your reply but I have some questions regarding the split you gave. I am not sure what set/rep ranges you are refering to with strength, size, and power. I am guessing that strength would be 3-5 reps, size 8-12 reps, and power would be speed-strength and strength-speed movements. I have been training with a modified westside template- is it advisable to keep ME work during the season (3RM or 5RM for strength days) or should it be dropped? Thanks for your help,
TR

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
binford wrote:
See thats the weird thing, i never feel drained after heavy sets, even if i do 10x3. I only feel drained after high reps, and find it hard to complete without dropping down the intensity to really low, like around 60% for doing sets of 10 reps.

That’s because heavy, low reps work is not metabolically draining. It’s only hard on the CNS. What I meant was that even the last sets should be completed without loosing proper form.[/quote]

This is interesting because I’m the exact opposite. I feel very drained after heavy sets. I’m “tired” after high reps sets, but I don’t have that drained feeling, and I perk up fairly quickly. Is this strange?

Christian-

With the ironmind sandbag kit that you recommended…how exactly do you set it up?

Do you put each storebought bag of sand into the yellow sleeve and then throw a bunch of them into the big bag or do you arrange it in some other way? I’ve been having problems with all of the bags flopping around and when you go and pick it up or try and press it, sometimes the weight will be unevenly displaced so you’ll have like 20lbs hanging over one side and 80lbs hanging over the other. Was wondering if this is normal or if there is a way to fix this.

Thanks.

[quote]AndyS wrote:
Christian-

With the ironmind sandbag kit that you recommended…how exactly do you set it up?

Do you put each storebought bag of sand into the yellow sleeve and then throw a bunch of them into the big bag or do you arrange it in some other way? I’ve been having problems with all of the bags flopping around and when you go and pick it up or try and press it, sometimes the weight will be unevenly displaced so you’ll have like 20lbs hanging over one side and 80lbs hanging over the other. Was wondering if this is normal or if there is a way to fix this.

Thanks.[/quote]

That’s kind of the point of sandbag training - to be able to handle awkward, uneven loads. However, if it’s totally unmanageable, you can stuff some old towels or old clothes in there to give it a bit more rigidity. I don’t have the Ironmind kit, but when I played around with some old Army duffel bags, that’s what I did.

[quote]MikeTheBear wrote:

This is interesting because I’m the exact opposite. I feel very drained after heavy sets. I’m “tired” after high reps sets, but I don’t have that drained feeling, and I perk up fairly quickly. Is this strange?[/quote]

Yes, you will probably die of a slow, painful death!

Seriously it’s something that’s quite common with individual who have a super efficient nervous system. I have trained guys who could run 12 x 60m sprints in a workout and get better on every rep. And I’ve had guys who could only run 2-3 before their time began to suffer.

The later were normally better than the former.

CT,
Just out of curiosity I started your Auto reglatory powerlifting program. Since it has been a few years would you do anything differntally if you desgined this program now?
Thanks
Will42

just one question. I saw a picture of Rigert’s back. Erectors are huge. Is that because of all pulling, or did they (soviets) do any other exercises?
I just can’t get that picture out of my head:)
Thanks

Will42, I’m currently on my third week of this too, (the auto-regulating thing).

Firstly, it’s working really well at the mo. I definitely respond best to frequent practice of the lifts and I am enjoying the challenge of hitting new pr’s at each workout.

My one (theoretical) concern about it would be whether I am going to be able to continue to break new records for 6 weeks continually. Time will tell however. If this concern comes true, what I may do then is use an EDT style PR zone for the 2 ‘heavy’ exercises - ie doing 15 mins with my 3rm and 6rm, and progressing in weight once I increase the total no of reps by a certain amount. I should stress however that at present I am progressing each workout so this may not be needed.

The one thing I add to the routine is a few extra workouts here and there. I have always done this anyway after reading Louis Simmons stuff so this does not reflect a perceived flaw in the programme, it’s just something I’ve found helps me. These are normally high-ish rep workouts focusing on the back, hamstrings and traps, and sometimes include some more quirky stuff like snadbags etc. I only spend about 20 mins on these.

I’d be interested to see if CT would recommend anything different to this, in fact I was hoping to ask him last night but the time difference here in the UK screwed things up…

[quote]Hrastnik wrote:
just one question. I saw a picture of Rigert’s back. Erectors are huge. Is that because of all pulling, or did they (soviets) do any other exercises?
I just can’t get that picture out of my head:)
Thanks[/quote]

The Soviets were known for using a lot of assistance exercises, especially compared to Bulgarian lifters who relied mostly on 3-5 exercises.

Rigert performed a lot of “power pulls” … he would perform 2-3 snatch/clean pull with straight arms (basically an explosive deadlift and shrug) followed by 1-2 snatch/cleans. He did this on many sets during his preparatory period.

He also used a lot of goodmornings and Romanian deadlift.

But we should mention that Rigert might have had superior genetics when it comes to building big muscles, which should also be factored in.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
MikeTheBear wrote:

This is interesting because I’m the exact opposite. I feel very drained after heavy sets. I’m “tired” after high reps sets, but I don’t have that drained feeling, and I perk up fairly quickly. Is this strange?

Yes, you will probably die of a slow, painful death!

Seriously it’s something that’s quite common with individual who have a super efficient nervous system. I have trained guys who could run 12 x 60m sprints in a workout and get better on every rep. And I’ve had guys who could only run 2-3 before their time began to suffer.

The later were normally better than the former.

[/quote]

Huh. I actually thought my CNS was INefficient. The last thing I would’ve guessed is that my CNS was SUPER efficient. But I suppose it’s possible that I developed some efficienty since I like to do explosive stuff. Thanks for the info - this is good to know.

CT- got any new violent variations for us to try out? I’m a huge fan of the tempo contrast method and the descending isometric holds.

just one more question. is there any type of cardio I could do, to lose some fat of my legs (without losing strength, cause I really need it as an oly lifter).
Thanks

[quote]Hrastnik wrote:
just one more question. is there any type of cardio I could do, to lose some fat of my legs (without losing strength, cause I really need it as an oly lifter).
Thanks[/quote]

Sled pulling alays worked well for me an my athletes. Try walking 4 x 200’ with a 90lbs sled 2 different ways (forward and backward).

[quote]irishrock wrote:
CT- got any new violent variations for us to try out? I’m a huge fan of the tempo contrast method and the descending isometric holds.[/quote]

I might write an article on some new methods.