T Nation

CT: Prime Time Question

I’m posting this early b/c I’ll most likely be commuting when you’re on Prime Time:

When you say you use the “cheek” as a skin fold test, are you referring to the gluteal fold (really)?

If it’s on the face, can you give an approximation of where the pinch is? A friend of mine, who has experience, is doing this for me and isn’t sure what to do?

[quote]Robert Monti wrote:
I’m posting this early b/c I’ll most likely be commuting when you’re on Prime Time:

When you say you use the “cheek” as a skin fold test, are you referring to the gluteal fold (really)?

If it’s on the face, can you give an approximation of where the pinch is? A friend of mine, who has experience, is doing this for me and isn’t sure what to do?[/quote]

It’s in the face, imagine a line between the cheekbone and the “corner” of the mouth. It’s at the mid-point of that line.

The “normal” values of the sites are in relation to the triceps …

Assuming a 10mm triceps fold we should have:

For a man
19.2 to 20.6mm cheek
8.0 to 8.8mm pectoral
22.4 to 24.4 sub-scapular
13.1 to 17.4mm mix-axilary
21.8 to 22.4mm supra-iliac
12.7 to 13.8mm abdomen
15.4 to 17mm knee (below knee cap)
7.5 to 8.6mm calf

*** OBVIOUSLY if the triceps fold is not 10mm the “normal” values of the other folds have to be adjusted accordingly.

If the relative values are higher for the sub-scapular and/or supra-iliac fold chances are the the individual is insulin resistant and would do much better on a low-carbs (or low glycemic) diet.

If the relative value of the mid-axilary fold is higher the individual probably has a low level of thyroid hormone and would benefit from a supplement such as HOT-ROX which can increase T4 to T3 metabolism. Supplements such as iodine, tyrosine and selenium would also be of help.

Excess abdomen fat (relative values above what is mentionned above) indicate a high level of cortisol. Relaxing activites and a supplement such as phosphatidylserine are recommended.

Excess hamstring and quads body fat is indicative of an excessively high estrogen level.

If the the relative values of the cheek and knee folds are hgiher than in the table above it indicates a low level of hGH.

All this info is from Charles Poliquin and Nelson Ayotte. At first I wasn’t convinced but after doing a ton of research in scientific journals, I found that most of it is indeed backed up by science!

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Robert Monti wrote:
I’m posting this early b/c I’ll most likely be commuting when you’re on Prime Time:

When you say you use the “cheek” as a skin fold test, are you referring to the gluteal fold (really)?

If it’s on the face, can you give an approximation of where the pinch is? A friend of mine, who has experience, is doing this for me and isn’t sure what to do?

It’s in the face, imagine a line between the cheekbone and the “corner” of the mouth. It’s at the mid-point of that line.

The “normal” values of the sites are in relation to the triceps …

Assuming a 10mm triceps fold we should have:

For a man
19.2 to 20.6mm cheek
8.0 to 8.8mm pectoral
22.4 to 24.4 sub-scapular
13.1 to 17.4mm mix-axilary
21.8 to 22.4mm supra-iliac
12.7 to 13.8mm abdomen
15.4 to 17mm knee (below knee cap)
7.5 to 8.6mm calf

*** OBVIOUSLY if the triceps fold is not 10mm the “normal” values of the other folds have to be adjusted accordingly.

If the relative values are higher for the sub-scapular and/or supra-iliac fold chances are the the individual is insulin resistant and would do much better on a low-carbs (or low glycemic) diet.

If the relative value of the mid-axilary fold is higher the individual probably has a low level of thyroid hormone and would benefit from a supplement such as HOT-ROX which can increase T4 to T3 metabolism. Supplements such as iodine, tyrosine and selenium would also be of help.

Excess abdomen fat (relative values above what is mentionned above) indicate a high level of cortisol. Relaxing activites and a supplement such as phosphatidylserine are recommended.

Excess hamstring and quads body fat is indicative of an excessively high estrogen level.

If the the relative values of the cheek and knee folds are hgiher than in the table above it indicates a low level of hGH.

All this info is from Charles Poliquin and Nelson Ayotte. At first I wasn’t convinced but after doing a ton of research in scientific journals, I found that most of it is indeed backed up by science![/quote]

This is so interesting. I’m really curious to see how I fair.