T Nation

CSCS

How many CSCS’s do we have here?

Bump

…and further, what is your opinion of the difficulty level of the certification test?

RSU

I just took the test recently, so I am not sure if I am actually a CSCS yet.

As far as the difficulty and all that…

I graduated with a BS in Exercise Science a few years back, and I feel as though I would have nailed it convincingly if I had taken it immediately.

I also feel as though I would have nailed it convincingly if I had opened the book up more than a day before I took the test…a little case of procrastination. As it was I made it through 3 and a 1/2 chapters out of the 24 in the book.

Conclusion…if you study and put forth a little effort AND if you have a related degree, then you should not have a problem.

Tucker

I’ve been studying for it on and off for a about a year. They sell an outline that tells you main points to study so thats what I’m using now to make my own outline

I got my CSCS last year after being out of school for 2 years. I have to admit if I took the test when I graduated, it would have been much easier (especially the Ex Phys stuff).

Many of the programming questions are tricky and could be answered correctly by chosing A or B, but you must try to find the "best’ answer. I have found that this test tries to “trick” you more than any other test I have ever taken.

Study hard.

BTW…the audio CDs are PRICELESS…I have to give them much of the credit for passing. Especially if you have been out of the classroom for a few years, the CDs bring you right back into the lecture.

what does that stand for?

I took it as a senior in college. Thought it was pretty easy actually. Probably becuase everything was still fresh in my head. I have not renewed it since the second or third year I was certified (5-6 years ago). Kicking my self now, I’ll retake this summer.

It stands for Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.

I passed the CSCS exam and will officially be a CSCS when I graduate next month. I thought the hardest part of the test was learning everything the NSCA way. Your opinion doesn’t matter, you must think like the NSCA. They also ask some questions that are a little tricky. They’re not hard questions, they’re just worded funny. Other than that, I thought it was very easy. One thing to keep in mind is that nearly half the people that take it do not pass. Be prepared because that?s a decent amount of money to loose if you fail.

It stands for Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. It is a certification from the NSCA - National Strength and Conditioning Association. In the professional world it is probably the one of the most accepted and respoected certifications of its kind.

I was an athletic trainer (ATC) before I took the test. Like it was mentioned earlier, if you have a related degree, then just spend a day or two brushing up on some Ex. Phys. stuff and focus on the safety requirements of designing a strength and conditioniing facilty and you should pass easily.

By the way reading information (including this site) from experts in the field (become an expert of human anatomy and read, read, read!) is a far better way to learn as this certification is very basic, but alot of jobs require some kind of certification.

[quote]Drewd wrote:
Be prepared because that?s a decent amount of money to loose if you fail.[/quote]

How much?

So is it the consensus of most people here that a little studying should get you on track for the test?

I have my Bachelor’s in Ex.Sci. but I must admit, for some reason the majority of my undergrad education was geared toward work with “adapted” populations (i.e., physically or mentally disabled)…I didn’t choose it that way, it just happened to be much of the core curriculum.

I’ve been out of it almost a year now, but want to take the test (mainly for the cert).

Do you need an exercise science or related degree or just any degree? Just out of interest, I am looking for a european equivalent. I am doing an MEng in Mechanical Engineering, I was windering if I could still get a CSCS certification and if going into the strength and conditioning field training athletes etc would still be a possibility after this.

[quote]Myosin wrote:

BTW…the audio CDs are PRICELESS…I have to give them much of the credit for passing. Especially if you have been out of the classroom for a few years, the CDs bring you right back into the lecture.[/quote]

Where might I find these CDs and how much do they cost?

Thanks.

I got my CSCS about 4 years ago. The NSCA has a website (not sure of the exact url, sorry). If you have an associated degree and study a bit, the testing is not all that difficult. If you have no background in health or exercise science, you can study the S&C manual and all their suggested materials comprehensively and you’ll also be fine.

Best,

Kevin
D.C., CSCS, RKC, CST

I got my CSCS almost three years ago when I was in grad school. I studied some but not too much, had just taken grad level ex phys, biomechanics, and strength and conditioning. The URL for the NSCA’s site is www.nsca-lfit.org
For the certification committie the URL is www.nsca-cc.org
This is where you can find info about the test. Also this you will find all the tapes and study materials there as well.

I have been a CSCS for 10 years and pretty happy with the NSCA overall. I think that the journals you get as part of your membership contain good research. (I know I am bumping an old thread, but I am also curious how many at T-Nation are CSCSs)

  1. PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS
    Guideline 2.1
    The Strength & Conditioning practitioner should acquire a bachelor?s or master?s degree from a regionally accredited college or university (verification by transcript or degree copy) in one or more of the topics comprising the “Scientific Foundations” domain identified in the Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist? (CSCS?) Examination Content Description58 (Appendix A), or in a relevant subject. An ongoing effort should also be made to acquire knowledge and skill in the other content areas.

So am I right that you have to get a degree to become NSCA-CSCS certified? I’m a bio major, which doesnt seem to qualify, and I dont go to an acredited school in their minds apparently. The only IL university they recongnized is WIU’s physical education program. If this is right, this is the most ridiculous thing I have heard in a while. The various kinesiology programs over the state are all better than most anything at WIU.

If this isny possible, I may just look into the CPT certification.

Thanks for any response.

[quote]reconyah wrote:

So am I right that you have to get a degree to become NSCA-CSCS certified? I’m a bio major, which doesnt seem to qualify, and I dont go to an acredited school in their minds apparently. The only IL university they recongnized is WIU’s physical education program. If this is right, this is the most ridiculous thing I have heard in a while. The various kinesiology programs over the state are all better than most anything at WIU.

If this isny possible, I may just look into the CPT certification.

Thanks for any response. [/quote]
You can take the CSCS exam. My undergraduate degree is from the University of Illinois and my Masters is from Northern Illinois University. It is a bit confusing how they use “accredited.” If you don’t have your bachelor’s degree yet though they will not send you your credentials until you graduate.

Since the thread got bumped, I’ll chime in. I took the CSCS and passed the first time. Aside from some ambiguity in the practical portion of the test, I felt as if it were pretty easy. If you didn’t have an Ex Phys background or no practical experience it would be much harder I would imagine.

I also wouldn’t bother buying the CD’s or practice exams…just study the book and you should be fine.

Took the exam 3 or so years ago. Great certification. If you’re up on your stuff in the strength and conditioning field, it’s a piece of cake. If you’re pretty rusty, you should probably open the book and study for a few days.

As for background, I’ve completed my bachelors and masters degrees in the past 15 years and have been in the fitness industry for 10 years. The test was no problem at all.