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Critique Training Program


i have written up a training program, some feed back would be great.

week2

week 3

week 4


week 5


week 6

What was your main approach for coming up with this program and what aspects of each lift are you trying to focus on?

i am aiming to increase all lifts, i am weakest at lock out on deadlift and bench.
my squat is not to bad but struggle out of the hole on times.

Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all.

JBO, you look well organized and have put a lot of thought into this routine. Looks great on paper. But will you be able to sustain that many sets and reps?

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]

would 70% not be considered working?, i find volume has worked best with me in the past, would you recommend lowering the build up sets and increasing the top end? my concern was recovery time. would working at 80%+ not increase the time for recovery.

i have tried a couple of the days and have managed but they have been tough, but i feel i have earned my lifts

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]
My thoughts exactly. It looks similar to a Sheiko program, but taken to another level. My guess is that if you are asking our advice you probably won’t be able to get through these workouts. The program just looks too complicated, I don’t understand the thought processes behind what you are trying to do. You would be better off with something more straight forward and most likely a lot less volume.

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]

would 70% not be considered working?, i find volume has worked best with me in the past, would you recommend lowering the build up sets and increasing the top end? my concern was recovery time. would working at 80%+ not increase the time for recovery.

i have tried a couple of the days and have managed but they have been tough, but i feel i have earned my lifts[/quote]

There is no question that you need volume to make gains, but how much exactly is another story. If you adapt to massive amounts of volume then you will have to do even more volume to continue progress. Unless you are already at a very high level then this is not an appropriate style of training for you.

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]

would 70% not be considered working?, i find volume has worked best with me in the past, would you recommend lowering the build up sets and increasing the top end? my concern was recovery time. would working at 80%+ not increase the time for recovery.

i have tried a couple of the days and have managed but they have been tough, but i feel i have earned my lifts[/quote]

There is no question that you need volume to make gains, but how much exactly is another story. If you adapt to massive amounts of volume then you will have to do even more volume to continue progress. Unless you are already at a very high level then this is not an appropriate style of training for you.
[/quote]

appreciate this. should i turn the volume down on the sets building up to the heaviest weights and keep the top end the same or lower it all?

and if lowering should i lower the sets, reps or both?

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]

would 70% not be considered working?, i find volume has worked best with me in the past, would you recommend lowering the build up sets and increasing the top end? my concern was recovery time. would working at 80%+ not increase the time for recovery.

i have tried a couple of the days and have managed but they have been tough, but i feel i have earned my lifts[/quote]

There is no question that you need volume to make gains, but how much exactly is another story. If you adapt to massive amounts of volume then you will have to do even more volume to continue progress. Unless you are already at a very high level then this is not an appropriate style of training for you.
[/quote]

appreciate this. should i turn the volume down on the sets building up to the heaviest weights and keep the top end the same or lower it all?

and if lowering should i lower the sets, reps or both? [/quote]

There’s not really a straightforward answer to this, all work at 70% and up should help to build strength (unless you respond more to intensity than volume) and you don’t need to work at the same intensity every day either. Sheiko uses a pyramid setup to get to the top weight of the day as well so that isn’t necessarily wrong if you are just trying to get more volume in, but it will fatigue you and can make heavy weights feel a lot heavier. Sheiko also works with a lot of different lifters and puts a lot of thought into his programs, I don’t fully understand his logic but most people make good gains on his programs. So my question to you is this: how did you come up with this program? Why are things set up the way the are?

My opinion is that most percentage based programs don’t work very well unless they are designed by an experienced coach because not everyone can do the same number of reps at a given percentage and work capacities vary as well. Plus, there are days you are stronger than usual and days you feel like crap and % doesn’t take that into account. I would advise going with a program that has been proven to work (5/3/1, Sheiko, etc.) or just get away from percentages all together. If you are wondering, I use RTS-style programming for myself. Autoregulation is the way to go unless you have a coach regulating things for you.

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]jbo616 wrote:

[quote]Ecchastang wrote:
Overall too many sets and reps to get to your working weights. For instance, why do 4 sets of 6 at 70% to then do 8 sets of 4 at 80%. Pick one or the other, and give it your all. [/quote]

would 70% not be considered working?, i find volume has worked best with me in the past, would you recommend lowering the build up sets and increasing the top end? my concern was recovery time. would working at 80%+ not increase the time for recovery.

i have tried a couple of the days and have managed but they have been tough, but i feel i have earned my lifts[/quote]

There is no question that you need volume to make gains, but how much exactly is another story. If you adapt to massive amounts of volume then you will have to do even more volume to continue progress. Unless you are already at a very high level then this is not an appropriate style of training for you.
[/quote]

appreciate this. should i turn the volume down on the sets building up to the heaviest weights and keep the top end the same or lower it all?

and if lowering should i lower the sets, reps or both? [/quote]

There’s not really a straightforward answer to this, all work at 70% and up should help to build strength (unless you respond more to intensity than volume) and you don’t need to work at the same intensity every day either. Sheiko uses a pyramid setup to get to the top weight of the day as well so that isn’t necessarily wrong if you are just trying to get more volume in, but it will fatigue you and can make heavy weights feel a lot heavier. Sheiko also works with a lot of different lifters and puts a lot of thought into his programs, I don’t fully understand his logic but most people make good gains on his programs. So my question to you is this: how did you come up with this program? Why are things set up the way the are?

My opinion is that most percentage based programs don’t work very well unless they are designed by an experienced coach because not everyone can do the same number of reps at a given percentage and work capacities vary as well. Plus, there are days you are stronger than usual and days you feel like crap and % doesn’t take that into account. I would advise going with a program that has been proven to work (5/3/1, Sheiko, etc.) or just get away from percentages all together. If you are wondering, I use RTS-style programming for myself. Autoregulation is the way to go unless you have a coach regulating things for you.[/quote]

i came up with this, after trying out a few of the known programs, i have run sheiko, smolov and a small bit of westside. i watched on how my lifts reacted to the different styles/parts of each program.
i found that the volume of smolov/sheiko was when i noticed the best results, i also enjoy that style of training. the accessory exercises i have chosen to implement are what i have found to have helped my lifts personally. i have mixed up different variations of each lift to work on different aspects of the lifts, so paused squats to help my strength from the hole (my weakest point), different bar positions for mobility and over all stability and comfort with the bar.

although the program i have written has exact reps, sets and weights, it is more an experiment. i plan on taking into consideration as i work through it that some parts might be to much and i will change as an when i see necessary, whilst still pushing myself. possible drop set numbers, drop % if fatigued.

it is all a learning curve really. with an outline

Looks exactly like Sheiko if it isn’t already a Sheiko program. Maybe you threw some twists in?

Give it a try, but my bet is, there isn’t much rhyme or reason to any of it from the looks of it. But just because I don’t see it doesn’t mean it won’t work. I just don’t understand the need for a complex program at any level of strength.

The fact is, as long as either volume or intensity are increased over time, you’ll gain strength if diet and rest are good. Like King Solomon might have said, “There is a time to push and a time to back off.” That is where you will learn your body and make even bigger gains.

In my experience, the more complex the program the more spinning your wheels you end up doing. Methodologies have stood the test of time. Use those and regulate your volume and intensity within them. You’ll end up further ahead.

Good luck either way you choose.

[quote]osu122975 wrote:
Looks exactly like Sheiko if it isn’t already a Sheiko program. Maybe you threw some twists in?

Give it a try, but my bet is, there isn’t much rhyme or reason to any of it from the looks of it. But just because I don’t see it doesn’t mean it won’t work. I just don’t understand the need for a complex program at any level of strength.

The fact is, as long as either volume or intensity are increased over time, you’ll gain strength if diet and rest are good. Like King Solomon might have said, “There is a time to push and a time to back off.” That is where you will learn your body and make even bigger gains.

In my experience, the more complex the program the more spinning your wheels you end up doing. Methodologies have stood the test of time. Use those and regulate your volume and intensity within them. You’ll end up further ahead.

Good luck either way you choose. [/quote]
i guess it was based on a sheiko program i used as it has worked best for me so far.
end of the day its only 6 weeks if it works it works if it dosnt well illtry something new

Now I see where you’re coming from, it’s like a Sheiko-style micro shock cycle. To be honest, I doubt that 99% of lifters could come up with such a complex program that will actually work. My advice to you is to either just get on another 4 day Sheiko program (you can also get him as your online coach if you have some money to throw around) or look into RTS for a more coherent way of organizing your training. No offense, but your program looks more unrealistic than Smolov - I definitely wouldn’t try it, and I just recently did 6 weeks of daily maxing. Sometimes the simpler solutions are the best choice.

It was hard to follow the reasoning behind movement selection and rep schemes. There are so many different variations that it seems the entire lift is weak so you’re better off doing the competition lift for the bulk of the volume. In the Sheiko programs I’m most familiar with, there aren’t that many different variations because you’re supposed to make noticeable progress and adapt to the chosen variations.

When modifying Sheiko programs, you should be aware of how the intensity and volume progresses throughout the cycle. Making a plot showing highest intensity, average intensity and volume on a weekly basis for an entire cycle will give you an idea of how it is set up.