T Nation

Critique My Squat, Bench, & Pull


#1

bench video will be up later today, pull video on thursday.


#2

You squat a lot like I do, and that’s not good. Your hips move backwards coming out of the hole and your back flattens out leaving you in a good morning position. Paused squats have been helping. Just have to work at driving your hips forwards straight out of the hole. Strengthening your quads may help too.


#3

Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.


#4

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.[/quote]

x2


#5

[quote]mccl8262 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

x2[/quote]

x3, worked wonders for me.

DD gave good advice too.


#6

pause squats are great, as are front squats for developing quads and core muscles necessary to keep you tall out of the hole. your depth is great, keep working hard and good luck in the future.


#7

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.[/quote]

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.


#8

[quote]mccl8262 wrote:
pause squats are great, as are front squats for developing quads and core muscles necessary to keep you tall out of the hole. your depth is great, keep working hard and good luck in the future.[/quote]

Been working on front squats, but may switch to paused squats.


#9

No bench vid. I had to lift alone today.


#10

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.[/quote]

Try taking a wider grip on the bar, this will allow you to bring your elbows forward and will make it easier to hold the bar in the low position.


#11

[quote]al1492 wrote:
zephead4747 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.

Try taking a wider grip on the bar, this will allow you to bring your elbows forward and will make it easier to hold the bar in the low position.[/quote]

I’ll try that.


#12

[quote]al1492 wrote:
zephead4747 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.

Try taking a wider grip on the bar, this will allow you to bring your elbows forward and will make it easier to hold the bar in the low position.[/quote]

I agree with this. A low bar with it placed on my rear delts gives me better leverage, and I’m not being pitched forward as much. Getting the elbows under the bar also helps you keep more upright, but I’ve found that i really had to widen my grip to do this.

If you can get someone to chalk up your back where the bar sits that works pretty well at keeping it in place.


#13

You look like your legs are 5 miles long. My body is structured the same way and my squats were referred to as squat/mornings. It seems like having spider legs magnifies this. I have successfully moved the bar down my back. It has helped immensely if you can hammer away at it. I’ve been able to do it with a super narrow bar grip.

I just wear wrist wraps or it feels like they will snap off. Marauder Meat may be able to give you some guidance on working on that. He helped me a lot with input.

The other thing I did was widen my stance and point my toes out at more of an angle. That has helped me go more up and down with squat and have less forward lean. The only caution with that is I now have to do a shit ton of warm ups on my hips and glutes and it can make it tougher to go deep.

I still work on all of this but my squat numbers went up a lot this year (for a 56kg lifter) and I attribute it more to form than strength.

Keep playing around with things and critically watching your own videos. What works for someone else may not be the answer for you.


#14

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.[/quote]

Then get to work on building some upper back mass. Shrugs, kelso shrugs, pendlay rows, face pulls, band pulls, seated cleans.

Start making it a priority.

Also, from a hand position standpoint, if you are struggling with bar position moving your hands out on the bar will likely lead to you hunching up your shoulders instead of squeezing them together. I would actually recommend moving your hands in.

The caveat to this is you need to start wider on wyour warm-ups and only have them closest for the work sets. Otherwise, it can be hard on shoulders and elbows.

This is what we do with lifters who need to thicken up, and the lightweight women we work with. We move their hands in, not out.


#15

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
zephead4747 wrote:
apwsearch wrote:
Lower your bar position. You fight it the whole time.

I can’t seem to get a lower bar position without it sliding down my back. I’ve been experienting.

Then get to work on building some upper back mass. Shrugs, kelso shrugs, pendlay rows, face pulls, band pulls, seated cleans.

Start making it a priority.

Also, from a hand position standpoint, if you are struggling with bar position moving your hands out on the bar will likely lead to you hunching up your shoulders instead of squeezing them together. I would actually recommend moving your hands in.

The caveat to this is you need to start wider on wyour warm-ups and only have them closest for the work sets. Otherwise, it can be hard on shoulders and elbows.

This is what we do with lifters who need to thicken up, and the lightweight women we work with. We move their hands in, not out.[/quote]

I’ll work on building some upper back mass, I always looked at it as one of my strongpoints, but I guess more work can’t hurt. I’ll also do the farther out during warmups thing, and closer in during worksets.


#16

[quote]ouroboro_s wrote:
You look like your legs are 5 miles long. My body is structured the same way and my squats were referred to as squat/mornings. It seems like having spider legs magnifies this. I have successfully moved the bar down my back. It has helped immensely if you can hammer away at it. I’ve been able to do it with a super narrow bar grip.

I just wear wrist wraps or it feels like they will snap off. Marauder Meat may be able to give you some guidance on working on that. He helped me a lot with input.

The other thing I did was widen my stance and point my toes out at more of an angle. That has helped me go more up and down with squat and have less forward lean. The only caution with that is I now have to do a shit ton of warm ups on my hips and glutes and it can make it tougher to go deep.

I still work on all of this but my squat numbers went up a lot this year (for a 56kg lifter) and I attribute it more to form than strength.

Keep playing around with things and critically watching your own videos. What works for someone else may not be the answer for you.[/quote]

Yeah my legs are long. My mom is about 3-4" shorter then me and her legs are like 2 inches longer then mine. lol.


#17

No one thinks my tail tcking at the bottom is relevant? I’m not sure how huge of an issue that is.


#18

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
No one thinks my tail tcking at the bottom is relevant? I’m not sure how huge of an issue that is.[/quote]

IMO, having watched it second time now, in addition to needing to lower your bar position, you really need to tighten up on the bar. This starts before the unrack. We teach people to “load up” under the bar before the unrack. Basically what this means is set yourself up under the bar with just a little less pressure than it will take to unrack. Get tight and in good positon. Then stand up with it and let it settle for a one count in your head before you step back.

You need to get into position before you unrack because you will never get into position under limit weight once you walk it out if you are not already.

I think these two things will go a long way towards cleaning up your form.


#19

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
zephead4747 wrote:
No one thinks my tail tcking at the bottom is relevant? I’m not sure how huge of an issue that is.

IMO, having watched it second time now, in addition to needing to lower your bar position, you really need to tighten up on the bar. This starts before the unrack. We teach people to “load up” under the bar before the unrack. Basically what this means is set yourself up under the bar with just a little less pressure than it will take to unrack. Get tight and in good positon. Then stand up with it and let it settle for a one count in your head before you step back.

You need to get into position before you unrack because you will never get into position under limit weight once you walk it out if you are not already.

I think these two things will go a long way towards cleaning up your form.[/quote]

What Search said.


#20

[quote]ouroboro_s wrote:
You look like your legs are 5 miles long. My body is structured the same way and my squats were referred to as squat/mornings. It seems like having spider legs magnifies this. I have successfully moved the bar down my back. It has helped immensely if you can hammer away at it. I’ve been able to do it with a super narrow bar grip.

I just wear wrist wraps or it feels like they will snap off. Marauder Meat may be able to give you some guidance on working on that. He helped me a lot with input.

The other thing I did was widen my stance and point my toes out at more of an angle. That has helped me go more up and down with squat and have less forward lean. The only caution with that is I now have to do a shit ton of warm ups on my hips and glutes and it can make it tougher to go deep.

I still work on all of this but my squat numbers went up a lot this year (for a 56kg lifter) and I attribute it more to form than strength.

Keep playing around with things and critically watching your own videos. What works for someone else may not be the answer for you.[/quote]

Ditto paragraphs 1 and 3 of this.

I rest the bar on rear delts or just a little higher on the shelf created by the lower traps. If on delts, I have my elbows back and have to really concentrate on keeping an arch. If on the shelf, I push my elbows under the bar which forces the upper back arch. But I really have to get foot position wide and force the knees out to reduce the lever arm created by my back and by my legs.

Extra-focused work on getting your ass and hams big will let you keep more upright in that stance. Zerchers and repped sumo DLs really have helped me in this. My ass has become the biggest part of me these days.