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Cressey's 635 Deadlift Form

would you consider the deadlift on Cressey’s article to be considered good form. Yes the weight is great but our his hips and glutes firing properly?

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
would you consider the deadlift on Cressey’s article to be considered good form. Yes the weight is great but our his hips and glutes firing properly?[/quote]

You can’t really judge a persons form on a maximal lift…

It’s a single max effort. He’s just trying to move as much weight as possible in as short a ROM as possible. Max effort DL’s usually look like shit as far as form is concerned. I’m sure if you saw him do light/speed work on the platform, he would look just fine.

But who cares, he’s rockin’
the Chucks.

Its Perfect flawless maximal pull form why he made the damn lift and thats all that counts when doing a competition maximal pull. White lights.

Sure hes aiming to be in great form but #1 he is making the lift, will judge and grow from there

its an inspiring pull

Phill

How do you tell if he is firing his glutes properly? Are you going to use your finger?

beef

Judging by the speed of his lockout, his glutes are working just fine.

Isn’t the perfect lift 2 white lights and one red?

This has to be a joke.

you guys take things so seriously. how to tell if glutes are fireing? um Look at the hips<the angle of the back. It just concerns me when newbies see form like that and duplicata it. Its just funny coming from the guy thats written so extensively of the importance of getting hips to fire.

I personally would rather not get the lift than to do a max effort romanian deadlift.

[quote]SWR-1240 wrote:
Isn’t the perfect lift 2 white lights and one red?[/quote]

Yup. See every squat by Garry Frank. Only hits depth on one side…looks good from the front…2/3.

BTW Cressey’s DL is gorgeous. Are you a PL? (asking OP)

Rather than bothering to reply, why not let EC do it:

(end of article)
"A Recap

I absolutely love the way by which the internet has facilitated information exchange in our industry, but the truth of the matter is that the curse of knowledge has become as serious a problem as ever. Aim to get stronger on the compound lifts and surround yourself with strong people in a good environment with the right amount of attitude, and you’ll be more than happy with the results.

Now, stop overanalyzing this article and go lift some heavy stuff."

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
you guys take things so seriously. how to tell if glutes are fireing? um Look at the hips<the angle of the back. It just concerns me when newbies see form like that and duplicata it. Its just funny coming from the guy thats written so extensively of the importance of getting hips to fire.

I personally would rather not get the lift than to do a max effort romanian deadlift.
[/quote]

There are no prizes for perfect form in a powerlifting competition.

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:

I personally would rather not get the lift than to do a max effort romanian deadlift.
[/quote]

You must not compete…

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
would you consider the deadlift on Cressey’s article to be considered good form. [/quote]

No. Absolutely not. How could you? His back is rounding quite badly. Is this par for the course with a max effort competition lift? My experience tells me yes, but that doesn’t make it “good form.”

I think the attitude seems to be that it’s okay to loosen your form on a max-effort lift. It seems to me, however, that the point of training is to get stronger in all the right places so you can do a max-effort lift properly.

I mean, what the hell is the point of emphasizing good form on your pulls (or squats, or benches) in training if you are only going to have to drastically break form to get the lift up?

A lot of authors recommend ending a set not when you can no longer move the weight, but when you can no longer move the weight WITH GOOD FORM. Obviously in a competitive setting someone is going to do whatever it takes, within reason, to get the weight up.

But at the same time it would be hard to take such a person seriously if they criticized my form or told me how to do a lift properly.

That I can’t speak to. I think it apparent, however, that the weight is far too heavy for him to pull with proper form. He looks the way he does, in my opinion, because he must alter his leverage so as to compensate for a lack of strength necessary to pull with a flat back.

Is the lift impressive? Yes, because it demonstrates a lot of brute strength. But the lift is not as impressive as it would have been if he pulled it with a flat back.

Some of you all are fucking retarded. I’m a hell of a lot more impressed with EC’s 600+ pound deadlift than anyones 300, 400, 500# lift with “proper form”. The fact that you are criticizing his form and saying he’s compensating for being “weak” in some areas speaks more to your lack of experience than anything else.

He’s pulling over 3x his bodyweight for God’s sake. Yes, his upper back is rounded, but his lower back is neutral which is all that really matters. YOU try standing up with that much weight and see if you can keep your entire back flat. Like EC says in the article, 315 isn’t impressive. 600+ is.

Dumbass.

DD

[quote]eic wrote:
Kill’Em All wrote:
would you consider the deadlift on Cressey’s article to be considered good form.

No. Absolutely not. How could you? His back is rounding quite badly. Is this par for the course with a max effort competition lift? My experience tells me yes, but that doesn’t make it “good form.”
… [/quote]

I assume everyone noticed it’s his upper back that is rounded, his lower back appears to be fairly neutral.

[quote]Kill’Em All wrote:
would you consider the deadlift on Cressey’s article to be considered good form.[/quote]

NO…but there’s a method to the madness
I’m a stickler for form. However, now and then (not everytime) I go extremely heavy (at the expense of form) to recruit the maximum amount of motor units I can in order to break through a plateau. you shouldn’t do it all the time for obvious reasons stated above.

Again, the purpose is to recruit the most amount of motor units and to break through a plateau…now this isn’t the only way of course. I wouldn’t recommend this approach in training to newbies.

you can’t really say yes or no to this question with certainty. However will it make you stronger when you go back to proper form and continue with you regulary scheduled programming? yes

How about a link to the video? I want to see what it looks like.

[quote]Julius_Caesar wrote:
How about a link to the video? I want to see what it looks like. [/quote]

Um… the video is in the newest article on the very top of the home page.

This thread is why EC has a 635 lbs. maximal deadlift instead of spending his day apologizing to the sticklers for good form.

Proper form = making the lift + no pain

Everything else is bullshit.