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Creatine Monohydrate and Diabetes?

Hi guys,
I have a friend (62 yrs old, diabetic, insulin dependant, long time powerlifter) who is asking me about Creatine supplementation. I can’t find any studies pro or con.

I can, of course, find lots of ‘dont use it its like steroydz’ and it will dehydrate you and stress your kidneys- my doctor said so.

Can anybody point me in the direction of unbiased research on creatinesupplementation by diabetics?

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Hi guys,
I have a friend (62 yrs old, diabetic, insulin dependant, long time powerlifter) who is asking me about Creatine supplementation. I can’t find any studies pro or con.

I can, of course, find lots of ‘dont use it its like steroydz’ and it will dehydrate you and stress your kidneys- my doctor said so.

Can anybody point me in the direction of unbiased research on creatinesupplementation by diabetics?

[/quote]

I don’t know that you are going to find any.

But I’m willing to bet diabetics have been used in other studies and I would think that if there were issues with diabetics it would have been noticed by this point.

Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.

I’m hypoglycemic/borderline diabetic. I’ve used creatine for years, and I’ve never had any issues.

Cheers guys,

Sorry but “Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.” doesn’t really have any science to it does it?

I found a little mention on a diabetic support site and emailed him th link.
He is going to try it, hopefully he’ll get the benefits!

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Cheers guys,

Sorry but “Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.” doesn’t really have any science to it does it?

I found a little mention on a diabetic support site and emailed him th link.
He is going to try it, hopefully he’ll get the benefits!
[/quote]

Neither does blinking. And I don’t see anyone asking if it’s okay to blink if you’re diabetic.

Knowing the function of creatine, there is no conceivable way that it can be dangerous. It’s a little molecule that accepts a phosphate from ATP, exactly what part of this would harm a diabetic?

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Cheers guys,

Sorry but “Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.” doesn’t really have any science to it does it?

[/quote]

Neither does blinking. And I don’t see anyone asking if it’s okay to blink if you’re diabetic.
[/quote]

LOL!

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Hi guys,
I have a friend (62 yrs old, diabetic, insulin dependant, long time powerlifter) who is asking me about Creatine supplementation. I can’t find any studies pro or con.

I can, of course, find lots of ‘dont use it its like steroydz’ and it will dehydrate you and stress your kidneys- my doctor said so.

Can anybody point me in the direction of unbiased research on creatinesupplementation by diabetics?

[/quote]

I don’t know that you are going to find any.

But I’m willing to bet diabetics have been used in other studies and I would think that if there were issues with diabetics it would have been noticed by this point.[/quote]

I am Type 2 Diabetic and used Creatine for the last 4 years off and on. I didn’t see any issues of creatine affecting my sugar level. It was the food and lifestyle outside of creatine that damaged it the most.

The way I see it creatine helps performance in heavy lifting which in turn builds muscle mass which a diabetic wants to maintain. I don’t know why it works, it just does.

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Cheers guys,

Sorry but “Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.” doesn’t really have any science to it does it?

I found a little mention on a diabetic support site and emailed him th link.
He is going to try it, hopefully he’ll get the benefits!
[/quote]

Neither does blinking. And I don’t see anyone asking if it’s okay to blink if you’re diabetic.

Knowing the function of creatine, there is no conceivable way that it can be dangerous. It’s a little molecule that accepts a phosphate from ATP, exactly what part of this would harm a diabetic?[/quote]

Very true. The only area that I’d watch for is the Sugar content of Creatine mixture brands out in the market. Creatine by itself in capsule or powder form is not the issue, it’s the 30 to 75 plus grams of sugar that’s thrown into mixture that Diabetics must watch out for.

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Can anybody point me in the direction of unbiased research on creatinesupplementation by diabetics?

[/quote]

Did you try Pub Med? I know it’s usually a source for nutritionists etc but you could try searching in there. Creatine is a heavily marketed, commercial product I just wonder how much of the studies would be unbiased.

[quote]kakno wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Cheers guys,

Sorry but “Use it. There’s no way in hell it can be dangerous.” doesn’t really have any science to it does it?

I found a little mention on a diabetic support site and emailed him th link.
He is going to try it, hopefully he’ll get the benefits!
[/quote]

Neither does blinking. And I don’t see anyone asking if it’s okay to blink if you’re diabetic.

Knowing the function of creatine, there is no conceivable way that it can be dangerous. It’s a little molecule that accepts a phosphate from ATP, exactly what part of this would harm a diabetic?[/quote]
But I already know diabetics who have been blinking for most of their adult lives!
(I know what you mean though, I just want to err on the cautious side if sombody asks my advice. Anyway he’s decided to try it so I’ll tell you if he drops dead; or stops blinking!)

[quote]XanderBuilt wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:
Can anybody point me in the direction of unbiased research on creatinesupplementation by diabetics?

[/quote]

Did you try Pub Med? I know it’s usually a source for nutritionists etc but you could try searching in there. Creatine is a heavily marketed, commercial product I just wonder how much of the studies would be unbiased.[/quote]

Yeah, tried Pubmed but nothing there.
He’ll be using monohydrate, like I do.

I seem to remember a study somewhere talking about how creatine helps with blood sugar levels- something about getting the sugar into the muscles and out of the bloodstream. I’ll be darned if I can find it though. If that makes any metabolic sense to anybody, please elaborate and maybe we’ll have a semi-scientific basis to the consensus of JUSTDOIT

Shouldn’t be an issue.

  1. "The chemical name of Creatine is Methyl Guanadine Acetic Acid. This goes to show that Creatine contains Guanadine. Guanadine has been extracted from the plant, Galega Officinalus and has been used to treat Diabetes from medieval times. The discovery of insulin revolutionized the treatment of Type I Diabetes.

When Type II Diabetes proved to be a serious condition, scientists have started looking at Guanadine as a treatment for Type II Diabetes again. Research and clinical trials have shown that Creatine intake can reduce the chances of adult- on -set diabetes because of its guanidine content.

Experiments have shown that very high dozes of Creatine can lower blood sugar in patients who are resistant to insulin. Research has also shown that Creatine and insulin can work together to help patients with Type I diabetes." per: http://www.creatinecenter.com/Creatine_Research/Creatine_For_Diabetes.php

  1. http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2001/02/01/2136/using-caffeine-and-creatine-in-your-workout/

Not sure of the validity of either source as the first link is selling a product :confused: Couldn’t find any scientific articles… but hope it helps some.

Look it up in JSTOR…bound to be some scientific journals explaining something there.

Found a very recent one:

Abstract

Creatine supplementation improves glucose tolerance in healthy subjects.

Purpose: The aim was to investigate whether creatine supplementation has a beneficial effect on glycemic control of type 2 diabetic patients undergoing exercise training.

Methods: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The patients were allocated to receive either creatine (CR) (5g/d) or placebo (PL) and were enrolled in an exercise training program. The primary outcome was glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary outcomes included the area under the curve of glucose, insulin and C-peptide, and insulin sensitivity indexes. Physical capacity, lipid profile, and GLUT-4 protein expression and translocation were also assessed.

Results: Twenty-five subjects were analyzed (CR: n=13; PL: n=12). HBA1c was significantly reduced in the creatine group when compared to the placebo group (CR PRE: 7.4+/-0.7, POST: 6.4+/-0.4; PL PRE: 7.5+/-0.6, POST: 7.6+/-0.7; p=0.004; difference: -1.1%, 95% confidence interval: -1.9 to -0.4). The delta area under the curve of glucose concentration was significantly lower in the CR group than in the PL group (CR: -7790+/-4600; PL: 2008+/-7614; p=0.05). The CR group also presented decreased glycemia at the time 0, 30, and 60 minutes during a meal tolerance test and increased GLUT-4 translocation. Insulin and C-peptide concentrations, surrogates of insulin sensitivity, physical capacity, lipid profile, and side effects were comparable between the groups.

Conclusions: creatine supplementation combined with an exercise program improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients. The underlying mechanism seems to be related to an increase in GLUT-4 recruitment to the sarcolemma. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00992043

©2010The American College of Sports Medicine

Cool

[quote]Old Dax wrote:
Found a very recent one:

Abstract

Creatine supplementation improves glucose tolerance in healthy subjects.

Purpose: The aim was to investigate whether creatine supplementation has a beneficial effect on glycemic control of type 2 diabetic patients undergoing exercise training.

Methods: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The patients were allocated to receive either creatine (CR) (5g/d) or placebo (PL) and were enrolled in an exercise training program. The primary outcome was glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary outcomes included the area under the curve of glucose, insulin and C-peptide, and insulin sensitivity indexes. Physical capacity, lipid profile, and GLUT-4 protein expression and translocation were also assessed.

Results: Twenty-five subjects were analyzed (CR: n=13; PL: n=12). HBA1c was significantly reduced in the creatine group when compared to the placebo group (CR PRE: 7.4+/-0.7, POST: 6.4+/-0.4; PL PRE: 7.5+/-0.6, POST: 7.6+/-0.7; p=0.004; difference: -1.1%, 95% confidence interval: -1.9 to -0.4). The delta area under the curve of glucose concentration was significantly lower in the CR group than in the PL group (CR: -7790+/-4600; PL: 2008+/-7614; p=0.05). The CR group also presented decreased glycemia at the time 0, 30, and 60 minutes during a meal tolerance test and increased GLUT-4 translocation. Insulin and C-peptide concentrations, surrogates of insulin sensitivity, physical capacity, lipid profile, and side effects were comparable between the groups.

Conclusions: creatine supplementation combined with an exercise program improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients. The underlying mechanism seems to be related to an increase in GLUT-4 recruitment to the sarcolemma. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00992043

©2010The American College of Sports Medicine
[/quote]

Hey that’s the one I was talking about!