T Nation

Creatine and Teenagers?

My son is 15 and is driving me crazy to let him take creatine. I’m not sure if I would like him to begin just yet. I am stressing how to eat and train correctly first, but he is impatient like all of us, he wants muscle & strength NOW. Any feedback on what age would be suitable to begin would be appreciated from QUALIFIED individuals on this subject.

There are plenty of topics on this site about this…just search

I like how you emphasize the need for advice from QUALIFIED individuals.

What makes you QUALIFIED as a parent? Or even QUALIFIED to determine who gives you advice?

Just struck me as ironic.

I took some creatine and my penis fell off. I would stay away from that shit.

In all seriousness, do some research. Creatine is not only not dangerous but is increasingly being shown to have other benefits outside of muscle gains. There are some threads on this site about studies on improved brain function etc from creatine use.

[quote]LoneLobo wrote:
I like how you emphasize the need for advice from QUALIFIED individuals.

What makes you QUALIFIED as a parent? Or even QUALIFIED to determine who gives you advice?

Just struck me as ironic.[/quote]

I agree, what the hell is QUALIFIED? is this guy expecting a panel of MD’s to show up on this thread?

why don’t you do a little research on your own lazy-ass…

there are hundreds of scientific studies that show the greatest threat from taking excessive amounts of creatine is diarrhea…

the only way your son is going to get hurt by creatine is if he chokes to death from eating too much at once or if he gets his ass kicked from shitting his pants while at school…

[quote]DPH wrote:

there are hundreds of scientific studies that show the greatest threat from taking excessive amounts of creatine is diarrhea…

[quote]

… so thats what it was… damn…

I’m guessing he means “qualified” as in experienced lifters, probably people that would have used an array of supplements. He may thought this is the place to find them. He’s right of course.

To the OP, creatine is a safe and effective supp. You’re on the right track with eating first. Creatine will help but it’s not something that’s needed. He’ll do great just eating lots of good proten.

Do you ever let your son eat salmon? Or red meat? How old was he the first time you fed him those things? If so, he’s already taking creatine through those foods, since they have lots.

Seriously, your concern is nice, but there’s nothing to keep him from taking creatine. It’s a natural substance and one that every active person should include in their supplementation plan. Is he taking fish oil and using a proper PWO shake? With those supplements and a good diet (read: massive food intake) he’ll be set.

lol creatine pulls water to the small intestines and can give some people bad diarrhea. as far as supplements go it’s about as safe as they get, just drink a lot of water or you’re wasting your time with it, wasting the product, and you’ll feel bad.

There actually is a small cause for concern. While it has been shown to be a safe and effective supp for adults, there’s a small chance that taking creatine in levels much larger than normally consumed through eating could permanently downregulate the body’s ability to create its own creatine when introduced in immature systems.

Unless there’s been some research on that in the past year I haven’t read yet, the actual academics are saying they’re pretty sure it wouldn’t happen, but they can’t say that with 100% certainty.

Personally, if you make sure he only takes an extra couple grams per day and make it contingent on eating healthy foods as well, I don’t see risk.

-Dan

I think you all have missed the underlying question this man has. It sounds like this father is more concerned that his son learns the benefits of good eating and training habits before he reaches for a supplement.

I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.

My advise would be to buy your son some great books (maybe even some offered on this website) on how to eat and train more efficiently and then make a deal with him that after he makes some sort of quantifiable gains you will allow him to use creatine.

There?s my two cents.

[quote]bonzi50 wrote:
I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.
[/quote]

That’s fine, but why not let his son take it so he understands that there’ no magic pill you can take. It’s not like the stuff is rediculously expensive or anything. If you’re having trouble with cash though, then I understand that.

[quote]hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.

That’s fine, but why not let his son take it so he understands that there’ no magic pill you can take. It’s not like the stuff is rediculously expensive or anything. If you’re having trouble with cash though, then I understand that.[/quote]

You?re missing the point. Magic pill or not there is no reason for anyone to use any supplements until they have at least learned how to design a diet for themselves involving nothing but whole foods. It?s like the old saying of putting the carriage in front of the horse.

[quote]bonzi50 wrote:
hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.

That’s fine, but why not let his son take it so he understands that there’ no magic pill you can take. It’s not like the stuff is rediculously expensive or anything. If you’re having trouble with cash though, then I understand that.

You?re missing the point. Magic pill or not there is no reason for anyone to use any supplements until they have at least learned how to design a diet for themselves involving nothing but whole foods. It?s like the old saying of putting the carriage in front of the horse. [/quote]

Don’t you mean carrot?

There is a point, by just giving him the creatine, it will make him realize he won’t get anything out of training unless he trains hard and has a good diet.

I didn’t say that’s what he should do, I just said maybe there’s more merit to it than you think. No, I did not miss the point, I was offering an opposing point.

what is the deal with parents nowadays…

Creatine is 100 percent safe. It also improves cognitive function. Yea, his grades might actually improve.

How or why a parent would ever be worried about creatine use is beyond me.

Save your lectures on drug use, drinking/driving and protected sex.

Gotta love how people take the time to make a two-paragraph post bitching about how people are wasting their time by not using the search engine.

[quote]pbody03 wrote:
I’m guessing he means “qualified” as in experienced lifters, probably people that would have used an array of supplements. He may thought this is the place to find them. He’s right of course.

To the OP, creatine is a safe and effective supp. You’re on the right track with eating first. Creatine will help but it’s not something that’s needed. He’ll do great just eating lots of good proten.[/quote]

Agreed and good post.

I would put him on Squats & Milk.

But then again, I’m not qualified.

[quote]hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.

That’s fine, but why not let his son take it so he understands that there’ no magic pill you can take. It’s not like the stuff is rediculously expensive or anything. If you’re having trouble with cash though, then I understand that.

You?re missing the point. Magic pill or not there is no reason for anyone to use any supplements until they have at least learned how to design a diet for themselves involving nothing but whole foods. It?s like the old saying of putting the carriage in front of the horse.

Don’t you mean carrot?

There is a point, by just giving him the creatine, it will make him realize he won’t get anything out of training unless he trains hard and has a good diet.

I didn’t say that’s what he should do, I just said maybe there’s more merit to it than you think. No, I did not miss the point, I was offering an opposing point.[/quote]

No, you numb skull. The horse pulls the carriage. So putting the carriage in front of the horse is like getting ahead of yourself. There are no carrots involved.

[quote]bonzi50 wrote:
hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
hockechamp14 wrote:
bonzi50 wrote:
I would have to agree with his concern. In my opinion too many people are searching for the short cut or the quick fix in supplements when in reality all they need to do is clean up their diet and training regimen.

That’s fine, but why not let his son take it so he understands that there’ no magic pill you can take. It’s not like the stuff is rediculously expensive or anything. If you’re having trouble with cash though, then I understand that.

You?re missing the point. Magic pill or not there is no reason for anyone to use any supplements until they have at least learned how to design a diet for themselves involving nothing but whole foods. It?s like the old saying of putting the carriage in front of the horse.

Don’t you mean carrot?

There is a point, by just giving him the creatine, it will make him realize he won’t get anything out of training unless he trains hard and has a good diet.

I didn’t say that’s what he should do, I just said maybe there’s more merit to it than you think. No, I did not miss the point, I was offering an opposing point.

No, you numb skull. The horse pulls the carriage. So putting the carriage in front of the horse is like getting ahead of yourself. There are no carrots involved.[/quote]

There’s no need to call me a numbskull. But baiting the changes in diet and training by using creatine is the same as putting a carrot in front of a horse. I understand english, but wasn’t sure which one you meant as you could have meant either.