T Nation

Crazy Combat Sports Theories

I used to shoot competitively and I read in a book that some of the best long range riflemen had backgrounds in ice-skating.

Does anyone have any sort of theories like that for combat sports. ie. A round head is conducive to a good chin or some such. I’m not asking for anything with a shred of scientific evidence, they can be logical or batshit crazy.

Mine is pretty tame, I think only children generally make shitty grapplers.

Along the lines of the ice skating/shooting connection, has anybody seen a dancing/footwork connection?

Bruce Lee was a dancing champ

wasn’t it really common for football player’s to take ballet to help them with their balance and some footwork?

[quote]haney1 wrote:

wasn’t it really common for football player’s to take ballet to help them with their balance and some footwork?[/quote]

I believe Bo Jackson might have took a few lessons, or it could just be a rumor.

As for some only children being shitty grapplers, that seems totally logical as they wouldn’t have any siblings to wrestle around with, get picked on by, or practice beating up their juniors.

I was told that horse riders have a very strong guard.

[quote]haney1 wrote:

wasn’t it really common for football player’s to take ballet to help them with their balance and some footwork?[/quote]

Yep. I don’t know how effective it is though since they only come to one or two classes.

[quote]Theta1591 wrote:
haney1 wrote:

wasn’t it really common for football player’s to take ballet to help them with their balance and some footwork?

I believe Bo Jackson might have took a few lessons, or it could just be a rumor.[/quote]

I recall commentators saying Ki-Jana Carter (RB for Penn State) took ballet classes.

[quote]
As for some only children being shitty grapplers, that seems totally logical as they wouldn’t have any siblings to wrestle around with, get picked on by, or practice beating up their juniors. [/quote]

Speaking as an only child who got routinely tooled when wrestling in gym classes, I’d say there’s something to that theory.

I’m a horseman and guard playing BJJ guy.

There was a great back and forth argument betweem Joe Rogan and Goldie about the relationship between headsize and KO resistance at a recent UFC.

[quote]Cockney Blue wrote:
I’m a horseman and guard playing BJJ guy.

There was a great back and forth argument betweem Joe Rogan and Goldie about the relationship between headsize and KO resistance at a recent UFC.[/quote]

No way! I’m well into my horseriding, didn’t want to admit it on here though. Didn’t help my guard for shit last night though!

Any athletic endeavour (dancing, breakdancing, ballet, juggling) can be a potential aid if it fits/complements your style/reflex and movement patterns.
It’s impossible to nail this down, take the old argument about dancing:

Some trainers warn their pupils that dancing will bust your rythm and will make you predictable, others claim that on the contrary, it helps them remain lose and spontaneous.
Nobody can decide that for you, find out for yourself if wearing a tutu can somehow empower your overhand right.

Some thoughts:
Yep, having a big head is advantageous for avoiding getting KOd. This is because big bones have large muscle insertions, so the neck is stronger, which is one important link of a good chin.

A big wingspan is advantageous for most “brachial” martial exploits, while short arms can help project raw power for certain hooks, depending on technique, of course .

Most Combat Arts are heavily laden with unnecessary bullshit and dogma.
People will believe anything an instructor will tell them.
The pygmalion effect or similar psychological phenomena are very real.

Shaolin Monks had zilch to do with the evolution of combat sports.

Naturally athletic and gifted athletes tend to be more often the lazy ones, often parting with the sport when the first series of compounding injuries comes around.

Classical strength training has a minimal direct impact on punching and kicking force.
Really strong dudes are of course heavier strikers generally.

Big Dudes get affected more often by injuries, everything else being equal. That goes for practically all sports.

Training both sides pays off. As can hyperspecialization (a la Bill Wallace), but more in a restricted enviroment (Boxing in a ring as opposed to MMA).

Maritla Arts cannot be reduced to a handful of vague principles. It involves athleticism, a bunch of sciences, psychology and the ability to explore your own deep human mind-canyon of repressed animal instincts with open eyes.
Combat Arts are like a four-dimensional Diamond.
It has to many beautiful and complex facets to be grasped by a single human mind at one time. Pick those who suit you the most, try to perfect them and strive to learn more.

But surely a big head is a larger target and harder to defend, it also carries more mass therefore when it is struck it will take more muscle to accelerate and decelarate it making it harder to bob and weave.

Schwarzfahrer, that was brilliant.

and i know nothing about guys who ride horses. Girls on the other hand…

slouched shoulder, or perky shoulder

slouched shoulder kids were better wrestlers

lefty righty

better to be righty

occasionally smoking

not harmful?

[quote]Roundhead wrote:
There was a great back and forth argument betweem Joe Rogan and Goldie about the relationship between headsize and KO resistance at a recent UFC.[/quote]

Source/link?

[quote]haney1 wrote:

wasn’t it really common for football player’s to take ballet to help them with their balance and some footwork?[/quote]

I’m not sure how common it was, but Lynn Swann is one example of a player who knew a lot of ballet. It makes a lot of sense to want to learn that type of body control and balance.

[quote]Fiction wrote:
Roundhead wrote:
There was a great back and forth argument betweem Joe Rogan and Goldie about the relationship between headsize and KO resistance at a recent UFC.

Source/link?[/quote]

I think it was 87 or 88 one of the fighters had a huge head and they were going on about it throughout the fight.

[quote]Schwarzfahrer wrote:
Classical strength training has a minimal direct impact on punching and kicking force.[/quote]

I somewhat disagree.

You may. That is main purpose of the board, discussing things, right?

I know too many scrawny fighters who hit like a mule just through decades of training.
An old kendo master with a stick will bash your head in easily, without squats nor milk.

You also have to understand that most of us males here never has to face hard labour.
Weight training prodices phenomenal growth especially at the beginning because most men are historically speaking, rather weak nd undertrained. And the last two decades were obsessed with cardio and cardio related sports (America may be different with AmFootball).

A fighter should probably play around with weights at least once seriously.
But developing your technique will produce better results by a mile. And that you will have to practice consistently. For Years. Decades, even.

It is certainly a bit more complicated, but I have already written a large post in a different thread, so for now let me leave you with this.

Samurai were at one time encouraged to develop a wide range of disciplines. Tea ceremony, music, dancing, underwater basket weaving, etc… Whether this was to further develop them as warriors or simply keep them occupied during times of peace is debatable. But I imagine nobody can be one thing 100% of the time. You can’t be MR.BJJ all the time. Everyone needs to get away and relax.

Plus, you may be surprised how dancing can mirror martial arts. Traditional martial arts especially. Learn to Tango and I swear your first tango lesson will bring back memories of your first Shotokan Karate classes. Jitterbug and Ballroom styles have moves that feel very much like shiho-nage and kotegaishi techniques from Aikido. Box step, foxtrot and the Charleston can feel like old Boxing 101 drills. And you have to do it with a really lovely girl in your arms.

[quote]Bujo wrote:
Samurai were at one time encouraged to develop a wide range of disciplines. Tea ceremony, music, dancing, underwater basket weaving, etc… Whether this was to further develop them as warriors or simply keep them occupied during times of peace is debatable. But I imagine nobody can be one thing 100% of the time. You can’t be MR.BJJ all the time. Everyone needs to get away and relax.

Plus, you may be surprised how dancing can mirror martial arts. Traditional martial arts especially. Learn to Tango and I swear your first tango lesson will bring back memories of your first Shotokan Karate classes. Jitterbug and Ballroom styles have moves that feel very much like shiho-nage and kotegaishi techniques from Aikido. Box step, foxtrot and the Charleston can feel like old Boxing 101 drills. And you have to do it with a really lovely girl in your arms.
[/quote]

As a boxer, I would love the opportunity to pursue some dance classes. I’d be interested to see if it had any affect on my boxing prowess. I want to try Salsa, but Tango sounds cool too.

My theory is that the McDojo isn’t as evil and loathsome as a lot of people like to make them out to be. I can bet we can attribute the rapid growth of MMA in part due to the increase in little commercial dojo’s in almost every town across the country. They don’t produce fighters (except maybe rarely) -but I bet a lot of fighters started there as kids. They also give the opportunity for your average joe blow to try his hands at some “karate kid” stuff - so when it comes to watching two well trained guys on the TV bash each others heads in they can at least appreciate the talent on some level.

I mean how many people started, to quote Napoleon Dynamite, at a Rex-Kwon Do place? My first dojo was United Studios (before they virtually disappeared) and I tested for my black belt under the founder. I studied there from age 5-14, and then I moved on to kickboxing and Muay Thai and eventually Boxing. Could I have benefited from starting some more fight-specific training earlier? Ya. Did I have to unlearn some stuff? Definitely. Did I waste the nine years I spent studying Kenpo? Absolutely not. If it wasn’t for that little dojo 8 minutes away from my house - I probably wouldn’t be where I am in my training right now.