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Correct Form for Shoulder Shrugs?


#1

I have searched around and have not found anything regarding this, so here is my question: When doing shoulder shrugs, are you supposed to "roll" your shoulders or simply lift them in a vertical motion? I have asked many people I know and have gotten both answers. Thanks in advance


#2

The only real type I can give is that if you lower your head you increase your range of motion. I generally donâ??t roll my shoulders no.


#3

I hear rolling of the shoulders is bad for your rotator cuff or something.


#4

Straight up and down, rolling fucks up your shoulders


#5

If you really want to do both, just use lighter weight with rolling as warm ups and do only vertical motion for heavier sets.


#6

Don’t roll.

Draw your shoulders up, and if you want you can pull your shoulder blades back WHILE you’re doing the contraction.


#7

Thanks a lot for the help. I actually tore my rotator cuff in football back in junior high so I’m sure you all have saved a re-injury later on.


#8

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
The only real type I can give is that if you lower your head you increase your range of motion. I generally donâ??t roll my shoulders no.[/quote]

Can you explain lower your head a little more?

Like look down face to the ground or crank your neck forward and down but still face forward?


#9

[quote]countingbeans wrote:
DoubleDuce wrote:
The only real type I can give is that if you lower your head you increase your range of motion. I generally don�¢??t roll my shoulders no.

Can you explain lower your head a little more?

Like look down face to the ground or crank your neck forward and down but still face forward?[/quote]

+1


#10

I found this about lowering your head. It appears to be a bad thing.

Figure 9A â?? If the lifter allows the shoulders to round and the head to come forward during the shrug, the line of gravity moves forward, as indicated by the dotted arrow. Such faulty head and shoulder position predisposes the middle and lower cervical vertebra to excessive sheer forces because the fibers in this region (C3-C6) are optimally arranged to elevate the load from this position.

From: http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/shrug_science_part_1