T Nation

Cool English Dialect Map

An exhaustive work here… impressive, but whoever made it, needs to “get a life”…lol.

http://aschmann.net/AmEng/#SmallMapUnitedStates

This is so cool. I know way too little about American dialects (though I do know a lot about Britain), so this is actually a pretty nice source for information.

I’m from the exact middle of the part where we speak like the dictionary came to life.

You want to hear the right way to pronounce any word just come see me.

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American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]

Can you imagine, with a Liverpudlian and a Geordie? I can’t bear to think it.

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]
When I was in Scotland this guy was talking to me for a good 15 seconds before I realized he had been speaking English the whole time.

As a map lover, this is a damn cool map.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]
When I was in Scotland this guy was talking to me for a good 15 seconds before I realized he had been speaking English the whole time.[/quote]

haha, gets me sometimes but our brains must be hardwired to eventually figure it out. Cant let some scouse bastard get one over us. Americans just smile and act like they understand.

I tip my hat to those people whose first language isn’t English and they go to the North West/North East of England. May god have mercy on your soul.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]
When I was in Scotland this guy was talking to me for a good 15 seconds before I realized he had been speaking English the whole time.[/quote]

I swear there are German accents where its exactly the same for me.

[quote]orion wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]
When I was in Scotland this guy was talking to me for a good 15 seconds before I realized he had been speaking English the whole time.[/quote]

I swear there are German accents where its exactly the same for me.
[/quote]

x2 it’s very difficult to understand a north German accent unless you’re from that area.

That British accent that Ben Kingsley spoke in ‘‘Sexy Beast’’ actually hindered me from enjoying it fully,
Americans REALLY had to mentally struggle to try and understand Kingsley in that role…from which part of England was
that atrocious accent from?

[quote]Karado wrote:
That British accent that Ben Kingsley spoke in ‘‘Sexy Beast’’ actually hindered me from enjoying it fully,
Americans REALLY had to mentally struggle to try and understand Kingsley in that role…from which part of England was
that atrocious accent from?[/quote]

I love Sexy Beast, and Ben Kingsley’s Don Logan with an undying passion. Incredibly well played, it’s amazing how he hooked into that from his role in Gandhi. It still amazes me looking back on his scenes, I loved his character so much.

Was it really that difficult? It seems like it would be tame in comparison to other deeper, more localised accents. I think it’s a regular old London accent, from which area specifically I do not know, but I would assume Hackney or the like.

[quote]Teledin wrote:

[quote]orion wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]harrypotter wrote:
American dialects are easy unless its street talk, but that has never been recognised really anyway.

Most Americans wont understand deep local dialects in England however.[/quote]
When I was in Scotland this guy was talking to me for a good 15 seconds before I realized he had been speaking English the whole time.[/quote]

I swear there are German accents where its exactly the same for me.
[/quote]

x2 it’s very difficult to understand a north German accent unless you’re from that area.[/quote]

Try an Allemanic one.

Western Austria, I have literally no idea what they are talking about.

Yeah, don’t get me wrong I loved Kingsley in that role as well…an intensity that may have made even
‘‘Tony Montana’’ melt in his Miami Hot Tub…Ben Kingsley was great, IDK man maybe I need to see it again,
but he was difficult to understand for me anyway.

I think it’s interesting these films don’t get enough exposure on American TV…Boy oh boy, they’ll run BAD BOYS with Will Smith almost every other week on TV somewhere, but films
like Sexy Beast are almost nowhere to be found.

[quote]Karado wrote:
Yeah, don’t get me wrong I loved Kingsley in that role as well…an intensity that may have made even
‘‘Tony Montana’’ melt in his Miami Hot Tub…Ben Kingsley was great, IDK man maybe I need to see it again,
but he was difficult to understand for me anyway.

I think it’s interesting these films don’t get enough exposure on American TV…Boy oh boy, they’ll run BAD BOYS
with Will Smith seemingly almost every other week on TV somewhere, but films like ‘‘Sexy Beast’’ are nowhere
to be found.[/quote]

Yeah I think I can see how some of the magic is lost if Logan’s “vocabulary” is inaudible, but if you can understand it, it is some of the most hilarious writing I’ve seen in a while. The aeroplane scene and the interrogation scene just after is brilliantly done.

They hardly get a mention in Britain either really, I mean as far as Ray Winstone films go, Sexy Beast is one I don’t hear too often, even less than Scum. (As an aside, Scum is an incredibly good film, I’d recommend that without question.) Most of the cult classic British films are things like Snatch, Lock Stock or This Is England. All are pretty good (This Is England is easily my favourite and perhaps the exception here), but I always feel like there are undoubtedly far better ones to choose from that fly under the radar.

I think it’s far easier to appreciate Don Logan as a character if you’re British, because it’s kind of that awkward, dry, sociopathic British humour that gets a lot of praise over there. Characters like Logan, Brick Top and Harry from In Bruges, that kind of example. Nonetheless by all means give it another go, maybe even subtitles if it gets too much, it’d be a shame not to experience it properly, but if it’s necessary then…

I see, in the U.S. ‘Snatch’, and ‘Lock Stock’ are a pretty well known…the others you mentioned I haven’t seen yet.
So much to catch up on…so little time.

there were entirely too many words on that website.

do you have one with less words and more pictures?

[quote]Karado wrote:
I see, in the U.S. ‘Snatch’, and ‘Lock Stock’ are a pretty well known…the others you mentioned I haven’t seen yet.
So much to catch up on…so little time.[/quote]

Yeah, I guess things like Trainspotting can hop in there too, they’re all pretty regular mentions. Scum is incredibly good, Ray Winstone was really young when he starred in it, but it’s a great kind of youth prison film.

This Is England is kind of a social narrative inspired by biographical events, kind of like a film that seems like a documentary, but isn’t. It’s a story adapted around the events of the director growing up in Britain in the ska era. Both are incredibly good, I even regarded This Is England as one of my favourite films of all time at one point, it’s dropped a couple places due to film experience and such, but still an incredible work to keep in mind.

I’d recommend for great British films, probably in this order…Trainspotting, Get Carter, This Is England, Scum, and of course everybody loves The Italian Job.

28 Days Later is a great one, and “If…”, but If… is part of a trilogy, not that it’s so much confined to that, but I feel it does work best in accordance with the other two.

Shaun Of The Dead is kind of a slapstick horror that I adore, you’ve likely already heard of it along with it’s “spiritual successor” Hot Fuzz, the final film in what is called the “Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy” (A delightful nod to the Kieslowski trilogy “Three Colours”, [PS: Red is my favourite]) comes out in two months time, if you can I’d recommend seeing the other two shortly before in time for the third, at least that’s what I’m going to do.

Those are mostly the pretty obvious ones, I could get a little more obscure if need be, but all are very good films.

[quote]Big Kahuna wrote:

[quote]Karado wrote:
I see, in the U.S. ‘Snatch’, and ‘Lock Stock’ are a pretty well known…the others you mentioned I haven’t seen yet.
So much to catch up on…so little time.[/quote]

Yeah, I guess things like Trainspotting can hop in there too, they’re all pretty regular mentions. Scum is incredibly good, Ray Winstone was really young when he starred in it, but it’s a great kind of youth prison film.

This Is England is kind of a social narrative inspired by biographical events, kind of like a film that seems like a documentary, but isn’t. It’s a story adapted around the events of the director growing up in Britain in the ska era. Both are incredibly good, I even regarded This Is England as one of my favourite films of all time at one point, it’s dropped a couple places due to film experience and such, but still an incredible work to keep in mind.

I’d recommend for great British films, probably in this order…Trainspotting, Get Carter, This Is England, Scum, and of course everybody loves The Italian Job.

28 Days Later is a great one, and “If…”, but If… is part of a trilogy, not that it’s so much confined to that, but I feel it does work best in accordance with the other two.

Shaun Of The Dead is kind of a slapstick horror that I adore, you’ve likely already heard of it along with it’s “spiritual successor” Hot Fuzz, the final film in what is called the “Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy” (A delightful nod to the Kieslowski trilogy “Three Colours”, [PS: Red is my favourite]) comes out in two months time, if you can I’d recommend seeing the other two shortly before in time for the third, at least that’s what I’m going to do.

Those are mostly the pretty obvious ones, I could get a little more obscure if need be, but all are very good films.[/quote]

Kahuna, you’ve inspired me to find and watch “Britannia Hospital.” I’m pretty certain that “If…” and “O Lucky Man” are readily available on Netflix. Haven’t watched either for years. I suppose I should organise a Lindsay Anderson/Malcolm McDowell marathon evening, and see if I can rope in a few other diehard fans of that particular brand of absurdist black comedy.