T Nation

Cooking Venison?


#1

I just got about 3lbs. of white-tail deer loin from my the father. Shot in rural Iowa.

How the hell do I cook this stuff?


#2

Cut it into medallions wrap it in bacon season like steak and grill till medrare. Add steamed veggies and your done.

50x


#3

just like beef but a little gentler on the heat and like the other guy said don't go past med rare... you could slow cook a stew.


#4

You could certainly grill it like said. Another option is in a pan with olive oil. Season, medium heat for 1-2 min then reduce heat to low and cover for about 5 min. uncover and flip for another 2.

I used to coat with a little flour, but the AD has removed that ingredient for me. It makes a nice thin, crispy exterior but definitely not necessary.

Times are approximate according to thickness. And these guys are right on the money about not past med rare. It will get very dry and tough if you cook it too long.

Enjoy! I've been eating a lot of venison lately since my good fortune in the woods this year.

cueball


#5

Thanks guys.

My dad and the internet said to soak it in milk overnight to remove some of the "gamey" taste from it. I guess I don't understand why you'd want a meat to not taste like itself. I can buy beef if I want to taste beef.

I'll probably give it a try this weekend.

Anybody slow cook venison? I just got a Crockpot to experiment with. I'm not a huge fan of stews, but I do like cooking roasts in the crockpot with some veggies.


#6

I would not soak it in milk. Venison has a great flavor. Also, don't slow cook the loin. It is the most tender part of the deer. I would see it as a waste to use loin meat for stew. Slow cooking is for "tough" meat to make it more edible.

Do as 50x suggests and cut it into medallions (If it was butchered at a processor it may already be cut this way) and prepare as suggested.

cueball


#7

We usually soak Antelope in milk overnight due to the gamey taste they can have from eating sagebrush. The taste of game can be heavily affected by what their eating. With back strap and tenderloin my dad taught me to slice it into thin strips lightly coat it with flour and seasoning and fry it lightly. We then eat it with fresh home made tortillas and salsa. Simply delicious.

D


#8

Good point about diet affecting taste. Since this deer was from Iowa, I would suspect it has been eating grains, among other things. This will improve the taste quite a bit, actually.

The deer I bagged this year in Kansas was near numerous crop fields and it tastes better than deer from Arkansas where I grew up that ate mostly acorns.

cueball


#9

Awesome. Now I just have to work up the balls to try this stuff.

It's not cut into medallions, just hunks of loin. I can also probably do "butterfly" style chops with it.

Thanks for the help!


#11

Garlic, Teryaki, A little Red Wine, and Oregano seems to work well for a marinade.

The meat sometimes tends to be tough and chewey, so a medium rare cook will be the best like the other guys said. I went shot my first two dear this year. I was finally of age to get my big game license. Our motto is "you shoot it, you eat it," unfortunately I had no idea how to cook it and butchered some good meat. Simplicity is key, but you need a strong marinade as many people, myself included, don't enjoy the "gamey" taste.


#12

I have plenty of meat to experiment with, so I'll try some different stuff out. Thanks for the marinade recipe.

Congrats on the first deer hunt. I went back when I was in high school--just not my thing, I found out.