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Conventional vs Trap Bar Deadlift?

Not sure how to put this but I would not dead-lift with an elevated heel if I was you.

If I couldn’t dead-lift without flexibility issues; I would spend the rest of my week getting to a point where I can dead-lift without an elevated heel/flexibility issues.

It’s a serious exercise, don’t compromise it.

[quote]Claudan wrote:
Not sure how to put this but I would not dead-lift with an elevated heel if I was you.
[/quote]

In a more general case, assuming you’re flexible to do it either way, what’s your take on using an elevated heel for deadlifts (if you’re not an Olympic lifter)?

As far as the rest of the post, I completely agree. It’s one thing to work around an actual injury, it’s very different to work around (ignore) a mobility issue.

Why is it a compromise deadlifting with an elevated heel? It just places more emphasis on your quads, doesn’t it? Having elevated heels during the time it takes to work out my ankle issues doesn’t take my back and hamstrings out of the lift. I watched this speech from George Leeman about cheat curls and just sloppy form in general, he brought up the point that swinging a bit on his curls doesn’t take his bicep out of the movement, bouncing on his bench doesn’t remove his triceps/chest from the movement. I don’t see why this principal of not having 100% proper form can’t apply to the deadlift?

[quote]Confinative wrote:
Why is it a compromise deadlifting with an elevated heel? It just places more emphasis on your quads, doesn’t it? Having elevated heels during the time it takes to work out my ankle issues doesn’t take my back and hamstrings out of the lift. I watched this speech from George Leeman about cheat curls and just sloppy form in general, he brought up the point that swinging a bit on his curls doesn’t take his bicep out of the movement, bouncing on his bench doesn’t remove his triceps/chest from the movement. I don’t see why this principal of not having 100% proper form can’t apply to the deadlift?[/quote]

Ok.

But you still should work on having the mobility to deadlift properly with a flat heel.

Oh yeah, for sure haha.

[quote]Confinative wrote:
Why is it a compromise deadlifting with an elevated heel? It just places more emphasis on your quads, doesn’t it? Having elevated heels during the time it takes to work out my ankle issues doesn’t take my back and hamstrings out of the lift. I watched this speech from George Leeman about cheat curls and just sloppy form in general, he brought up the point that swinging a bit on his curls doesn’t take his bicep out of the movement, bouncing on his bench doesn’t remove his triceps/chest from the movement. I don’t see why this principal of not having 100% proper form can’t apply to the deadlift?[/quote]

I would say that deadlifting in a raised heel is going to start running the risk of getting you out in front of the bar with your hips to high, essentially turning it into a RDL. Maybe. I don’t really lift with an elevated heel so take that for what its worth.

[quote]Confinative wrote:
Why is it a compromise deadlifting with an elevated heel? It just places more emphasis on your quads, doesn’t it? Having elevated heels during the time it takes to work out my ankle issues doesn’t take my back and hamstrings out of the lift. I watched this speech from George Leeman about cheat curls and just sloppy form in general, he brought up the point that swinging a bit on his curls doesn’t take his bicep out of the movement, bouncing on his bench doesn’t remove his triceps/chest from the movement. I don’t see why this principal of not having 100% proper form can’t apply to the deadlift?[/quote]

Play around with flat footed and elevated heal to see which is more comfortable/stronger. There is no rule that says you have to deadlift flat footed.

Yeah I can see that being a problem as well. That’s a good point!

Yeah I’m gonna keep experimenting with it. I’ll give that article a read after this class! Thanks for the link.

[quote]LoRez wrote:
In a more general case, assuming you’re flexible to do it either way, what’s your take on using an elevated heel for deadlifts (if you’re not an Olympic lifter)?
[/quote]

I have no take tbh. I don’t do it so I don’t recommend others do it.

I’m 6’2, and if I got over my flexibility issues, then anyone shorter than me should be able too.

1)Stretch the calves by placing your foot against any flat vertical surface and lean forward.

  1. Do “foot circles”. Point your foot out as rigidly as you can, then roll it/ do a wide slow circle.

It helps in stretching the ankles/lower calf area. One circle = one rep, do 3 sets of 10 and you are ready to dominate.

I don’t understand - who dead-lifts for their quads?

It’s not about deadlifting for your quads, it’s that having a raised heel is no different than taking sumo instead of conventional. It’s just a different form of the deadlift. My point is, having a raised heel shouldn’t be seen as “bad form” or in a negative light because it has different advantages than conventional, such as the increased quad activation. I’m only using the shoes as a way of getting around my ankle issues as I work on resolving them through stretching etc. That’s all.

IMO, one of the hardest parts about deadlifting is figuring out its a “pull” and getting the feeling of being on your heels while you pull. You don’t want to make it harder to get that feeling. To state it redundantly, its counterproductive to focus on doing something that’s counterproductive to doing the lift properly. If you want a quad exercise, do a quad exercise.

That’s my point though, why is doing it with raised heels improper form? That’s like saying doing it sumo is improper form. Just because different muscles are activated using the technique it doesn’t make it improper deadlift form. Moreover, in my current situation, I’m only using it as a means of getting around my ankle issues, until I resolve them through stretching etc.

I think I read somewhere Riptoe pulls conventional with a raised heel–so I’m not saying its necessarily wrong–but for me I don’t see how it would help get the right feeling/leverages for the lift. If you want to do it, do it, and report your results.

To me, it sounds like

“I’m doing a row, slightly differently, so my bicep gets activated more - why is this improper form?”

well… A row isn’t a bicep exercise even though it does put stress on the bicep.

A deadlift isn’t a quad exercise even though it may put stress on your quads.

It sounds like you are just trying to justify your inflexibility in a way that sounds good!

[quote]jjackkrash said:
If you want to do it, do it, and report your results.[/quote]

[quote]Claudan wrote:
To me, it sounds like

“I’m doing a row, slightly differently, so my bicep gets activated more - why is this improper form?”

well… A row isn’t a bicep exercise even though it does put stress on the bicep.

A deadlift isn’t a quad exercise even though it may put stress on your quads.

It sounds like you are just trying to justify your inflexibility in a way that sounds good!

[quote]jjackkrash said:
If you want to do it, do it, and report your results.[/quote][/quote]

If bodybuilding is your goal, then you may be correct. But saying, I deadlift with a raised heel to help recruit my quads more so that I can lift more, just means you are being smart if having the strongest big 3 you can is your goal

[quote]jbpick86 wrote:

[quote]Claudan wrote:
To me, it sounds like

“I’m doing a row, slightly differently, so my bicep gets activated more - why is this improper form?”

well… A row isn’t a bicep exercise even though it does put stress on the bicep.

A deadlift isn’t a quad exercise even though it may put stress on your quads.

It sounds like you are just trying to justify your inflexibility in a way that sounds good!

[quote]jjackkrash said:
If you want to do it, do it, and report your results.[/quote][/quote]

If bodybuilding is your goal, then you may be correct. But saying, I deadlift with a raised heel to help recruit my quads more so that I can lift more, just means you are being smart if having the strongest big 3 you can is your goal[/quote]

that sounds solid

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:
IMO, one of the hardest parts about deadlifting is figuring out its a “pull” and getting the feeling of being on your heels while you pull. You don’t want to make it harder to get that feeling. To state it redundantly, its counterproductive to focus on doing something that’s counterproductive to doing the lift properly. If you want a quad exercise, do a quad exercise. [/quote]
^ This … Also, Elevating your heals will teach you to push more with your heals not your toes. therefore, activating more hamstrings and glutes, not the quads.

I’m gonna try out the conventional deadlift with raised heels for a couple months, then test my conventional max without raised heels. I’ll post the results! All of your answers really have me wondering now haha.