T Nation

Controlled Bulking

Anyone ever read this old article by Lonnie Lowery and Robert Fortney.

I believe this goes in line with what’s being discussed lately. Yeah, sometimes bodyweight increase can be a goal, but this article shows how and why calculated tabs are worked into the goal.

Bravo!
I might add to or alter the advise around the edges, but it’s otherwise solid.

The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.

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Maybe I am wrong here, but is this not what Prof X have been talking about all along?

Gain weight, then stay at that weight untill it have become your new set point.

[quote]florelius wrote:
Maybe I am wrong here, but is this not what Prof X have been talking about all along?

Gain weight, then stay at that weight untill it have become your new set point.[/quote]

It’s similar.

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.

The only significant difference I can see between what the authors say is that the authors don’t believe this is appropriate if you’re over %18 bf. \

Edit: too late.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.
[/quote]

So do you recommend people staying in the 10-15% range, generally speaking?

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.
[/quote]

So do you recommend people staying in the 10-15% range, generally speaking?[/quote]

Yes; I don’t see any advantage to exceeding 15% for most lifters.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.
[/quote]

So do you recommend people staying in the 10-15% range, generally speaking?[/quote]

Yes; I don’t see any advantage to exceeding 15% for most lifters.
[/quote]

So is your position that 10% is too lean to “grow into” but 15% is good for “growing into”, thus the need to gain 10 pounds first, then “growing into” the new weight?

FTR, I’m not trying to bait you into anything, just genuinely curious as to why you think growing into a weight works at one weight but not another.

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.
[/quote]

So do you recommend people staying in the 10-15% range, generally speaking?[/quote]

Yes; I don’t see any advantage to exceeding 15% for most lifters.
[/quote]

So is your position that 10% is too lean to “grow into” but 15% is good for “growing into”, thus the need to gain 10 pounds first, then “growing into” the new weight?

FTR, I’m not trying to bait you into anything, just genuinely curious as to why you think growing into a weight works at one weight but not another.
[/quote]

In the article they use the term ‘calorie-draining variables’ and although I’ll concede that is a very loose term, I fear it is about as specific as one can get. There are certainly lifters that can progress while lean, but they are in the minority IMO. Again; I don’t like the term ‘growing into’ a weight, but I do believe the ‘buffer’ allows a lifter to perpetually (or as close as one gets)improve without making constant adjustments to either the input or output as circumstances (known or unknown) change.

I also do not advocate adding any additional body-weight without a firm handle on the macros and specifically controlling the % of calories from carbohydrates. I believe you must start with a known lean weight and add 10-15% to that, I do not agree that you just add 10 lbs. to whatever a lifter may currently weigh. That isn’t specific enough for me.

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]LankyMofo wrote:
The glaring weakness in the article is that in theory, shouldn’t a trainer be able to simply stay at the same weight they’re at currently and “recomp” to a better body composition? That’s basically what he’s advocating but recommends gaining 10 pounds first.[/quote]

IMO…the upper range used in the article (18%) is high for most lifters and I don’t believe it is possible to actually ‘grow’ into the weight.
[/quote]

So do you recommend people staying in the 10-15% range, generally speaking?[/quote]

Yes; I don’t see any advantage to exceeding 15% for most lifters.
[/quote]

So is your position that 10% is too lean to “grow into” but 15% is good for “growing into”, thus the need to gain 10 pounds first, then “growing into” the new weight?

FTR, I’m not trying to bait you into anything, just genuinely curious as to why you think growing into a weight works at one weight but not another.
[/quote]

In the article they use the term ‘calorie-draining variables’ and although I’ll concede that is a very loose term, I fear it is about as specific as one can get. There are certainly lifters that can progress while lean, but they are in the minority IMO. Again; I don’t like the term ‘growing into’ a weight, but I do believe the ‘buffer’ allows a lifter to perpetually (or as close as one gets)improve without making constant adjustments to either the input or output as circumstances (known or unknown) change.

I also do not advocate adding any additional body-weight without a firm handle on the macros and specifically controlling the % of calories from carbohydrates. I believe you must start with a known lean weight and add 10-15% to that, I do not agree that you just add 10 lbs. to whatever a lifter may currently weigh. That isn’t specific enough for me.
[/quote]

Hey BC, I’m really enjoying your posts here.

So let’s say we have guy who is 180 pounds. If we take the 10% gain, he’ll aim to get to 198 pounds. What’s your particular caloric increase? I think a 10 to 15% increase in calories is a good starting point. How long do you think it should take for the 10 to 15% increase in bodyweight to be made? They said vague stuff about the rate of the intended gain, like, “if it takes a month or three months…”.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
Hey BC, I’m really enjoying your posts here.

So let’s say we have guy who is 180 pounds. If we take the 10% gain, he’ll aim to get to 198 pounds. What’s your particular caloric increase? I think a 10 to 15% increase in calories is a good starting point. How long do you think it should take for the 10 to 15% increase in bodyweight to be made? They said vague stuff about the rate of the intended gain, like, “if it takes a month or three months…”. [/quote]

For the typical 180lb lifter I like to start with at least a 15% increase (that is usually 400-600/ day). I think 8-12 weeks is about right, but many intermediates on a ‘rebound’ will get there sooner. They also mention maintaining that weight for as little as 6 months and IMO that is not adequate, 18-24 months is what I consider appropriate.