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Contreras' 2x4

Nobody talked about Bret Contreras’ new training program : 2x4, which as just came out ?

For those who love 5/3/1 variations…:wink:

Mathieu

Brian Carroll vaguely mentioned it on his blog. Don’t think he cared too much for a guy whos done two meets coming out with a strength book. Normally I say don’t knock till you try, but I dunno…maybe he should just stick to being the glute guy.

[quote]MightyMouse17 wrote:
Brian Carroll vaguely mentioned it on his blog. Don’t think he cared too much for a guy whos done two meets coming out with a strength book. Normally I say don’t knock till you try, but I dunno…maybe he should just stick to being the glute guy.[/quote]

Yeah, but equally sad is that people pay money for all the other derivative stuff like 531, Cube, Starting strength, etc.

Not doggin’ the guy, but not sure I’d try a strength program from someone with these numbers.

I’m sure Bret’s a nice guy, but with a 413 squat at 236, he’s certainly not a guy I’d look to for strength advice.

I tried to link Brian Carroll’s comments yesterday, but I guess the mods aren’t crazy about linking to other sites. I have to agree with Brian though, it’s hard to be credible on the topic of strength when you haven’t built much yourself. And as far as I know, Bret hasn’t coached any high level lifters; if I’m wrong about that I’m happy to be corrected.

Long and short of it, I wouldn’t shell for this kind of information.

I haven’t read his info or anything, but it may be a beginner’s guide type of program, much like the Stronglifts 5x5 program, where you start with the bar, and add 5 lbs every time, and squat 3 times a week (essentially putting you at doing 5x5 of 225 at the end of the program)

I know the 5x5 program is great for people just starting with no experience at all, aka, my wife who I had to start her with a curl bar :slight_smile:

Ive thought about this a lot. In many professional team sports generally the best coaches are the ones who struggled as a player or athlete. In the strength arena however I do believe you have to better (more accomplished, for the most part) than your target audience to get any sort sustainability and respectability. Im not sure if Contreras is catering to the beginner, but it still doesent matter. For a guy who has an average total, to put out a new strength book is overreaching IMO

I love his stuff for staying or getting healthy and it’s helped me a lot… but I’m with the guys above.

He’s certainly very good in biomechanics and does his research well.

Strengthwise it’s just excuses, being 6"4 myself and only 225pounds BW I still squatted 500+ raw with better form at meets, 600+ equipped
(And I would consider myself weak). Without doing any glute bridges I still managed to start my lift with straight knees and fully extended hips - not like him in the video above with bent knees (red lights) and a already bent hip. Not mentioning rounding over at the bottom (in theory next to flexibility, core stability and good glutes should fix that hmmmm…)

So the program will still be good for any beginner/intermediate and is probably still structured good and is going to work. But in my opinion there are too many powerlifters that are far stronger with more experience and still know how to program …

That’s funny. Anybody will put out a strength training e-book these days. And people will buy it because it’s so easy with just a button push away.

Anybody remember when Bret Contreras said Usain Bolt would have faster sprint times if only he included the hip thrust into his programming?

Thanks guys, now I know not to waste my time with hip thrusts.

I don’t know about others, but I’m not saying he doesn’t have good ideas or you shouldn’t listen to him. I just think he’s overreaching making a book about powerlifting. I’m just not convinced he’s an expert in it.

Guys check out my 3x4 program, I accept all major credit cards.