T Nation

Constant Tension the Right Tool?


#1

I found this post on my facebook, I don't follow Shoenfield, but I do follow Hatfield, and he liked the post:

Brad Schoenfeld
4 hrs ·
I keep seeing posts saying that a time-under-tension of 40-70 seconds is ideal for muscle hypertrophy. Despite being widely accepted as gospel, I'm aware of no evidence to support the claim. To the contrary, research from my lab and others indicate that multiple sets of short duration (~10 secs) can produce equal hypertrophy to moderate load training, at least over short time periods. Now maximizing hypertrophy over the long term is more complex than what can be extrapolated from current research, and likely involves training across a spectrum of loading zones to promote optimal fiber type-specific growth. But the TUT theory, at least as it relates to work done in a given set, needs to be rethought.


I myself have always been skeptical of the 40-70 time limit frame, so I have never bothered to time my sets or attempt any structured tempo program like I hear some people talk about.


#2

It is a good tool for various reasons. Among many others. That’s all. The take home point should be this:

[quote]
Now maximizing hypertrophy over the long term is more complex than what can be extrapolated from current research, and likely involves training across a spectrum of loading zones to promote optimal fiber type-specific growth. [/quote]


#3

The more research that comes out the more we can see that Chad Waterbury has been right all along.

As for Brad Schoenfeld, TNation should try and get him to be a regular writer.


#4

Can be very effective but sucks the life out of training…

also can be a useful tool for accesory work now and again


#5

Lift heavy weights, for low reps. Don’t worry about constant tension or TUT. The weight is heavy, the set won’t last long. These heavy lifts challenge the CNS and build strength. Think Bulgarian. Do big, heavy, barbell lifts.

Lift medium weights. Multiple sets of low reps. Lots of 1st reps, good practice. Think Russian style. This is a good way to train your “main lifts.” Think of power and bar speed. Don’t grind.

Lift light weights. Do high reps for muscle growth. Keep tension on the muscle! Use those squeeze and max tension techniques. You know you’re stronger on the “lowering” or concentric, so go slow on this part. Think of John Meadows style, body building. Use this style to build small or lagging muscles. On isolation moves, or machines. Don’t go for max TUT on the bench press, and wonder why your bench press skill goes down. Keep constant tension on hack squats and dumbbell flies.


#6

all you need to build muscle is two things: strain and burn.

Lift a weight so heavy you have to really strain.

Lift a lighter weight so many times it burns.

Shit’s checkers, it ain’t chess.