T Nation

Conjugate Sequence Templates

Lately I have been starting threads concerning different types of periodization.

In this, I have been planning theoretical sequenced blocks, based on different theories.

I will be posting the following blocks today:

Concurrent Block 1
Max Effort Block 1
Repitition Effort Block 1

BREIF EXPLANATION
Concurrent Blocks
-Develop Size and Strength simultaneously
Max Effort Blocks-
-Maximize Strength with size matienence
Repitition Effort Blocks-
-Maximize Size with Strength matienence

Once all 9 blocks are posted, you will understand my progression.

CONCURRENT BLOCK 1

MONDAY: ME UPPER

  1. BENCH PRESS WORK UP TO 1 OR 3 RM
  2. CLOSE GRIP BENCH PRESS 4X10
  3. ROWING VARIATION 4X10
  4. LIGHT SHOULDER WORK

WED: ME LOWER

  1. SQUAT WORK UP 3 RM
  2. GOOD MORNING 4X10
  3. STEP UP 4X10
  4. GHR 4X10

FRI: RE TOTAL BODY

  1. OHP 5X5
  2. CLEANS 5X5
  3. DEADLIFTS 5X5

MAX EFFORT BLOCK 1

MONDAY: ME VERTICAL

  1. PRESS 5/3/1 WAVE
  2. PRESSING VARIATION 5X5
  3. PULLING VARIATION 5X5
    4-5: YOUR CHOICE

WED: ME LOWER

  1. SQUAT VARIATION 5/3/1 WAVE
    2 QUAD DOMINANT 5X5
    3 HIP DOMINANT 5X5
    4-5: YOUR CHOICE

FRI: ME HORIZONTAL
SAME AS MONDAY

I’m sure you will make fine gains on this type of program, but I feel you may be outthinking yourself a bit here. The whole point of the conjugated method is to train different strength qualities at once; it seems counter productive to separate these qualities so drastically.

Bear

REPITITION EFFORT BLOCK 1

MONDAY: UPPER HORIZONTAL

  1. PRESS WORK UP TO 1-3 RM
    A1. PRESSING VARIATION 4-6X4-6
    A2. PULLING VARIATION 4-5X4-6
    B1. PRESSING VARIATION 3-4X6-8
    B2. PULLING VARIATION 3-4X6-8

WED: LEG DAY

  1. SV WORKUP 1-3 RM
    A1. QD 4-6X4-6
    A2. HD 4-6X4-6
    B1. QD 4-6X4-6
    B2. HP 4-6X4-6

FRI: UPPER VERTICAL
SAME AS MONDAY BUT USE VERTICAL EXERCISES

Hey Mr. Bear,

These are just theoretical blocks, so things are prone to change.

The qualities, arent seperated. In certain blocks, a quality is emphasized while others are matainied. Thus the emphasis is shifting from block to block.

I hope that makes sense.

Thanks for your thoughts though.

[quote]Mr. Bear wrote:
I’m sure you will make fine gains on this type of program, but I feel you may be outthinking yourself a bit here. The whole point of the conjugated method is to train different strength qualities at once; it seems counter productive to separate these qualities so drastically.

Bear[/quote]

[quote]thetruth24 wrote:
Hey Mr. Bear,

These are just theoretical blocks, so things are prone to change.

The qualities, arent seperated. In certain blocks, a quality is emphasized while others are matainied. Thus the emphasis is shifting from block to block.

I hope that makes sense.

Thanks for your thoughts though.

Mr. Bear wrote:
I’m sure you will make fine gains on this type of program, but I feel you may be outthinking yourself a bit here. The whole point of the conjugated method is to train different strength qualities at once; it seems counter productive to separate these qualities so drastically.

Bear

[/quote]

I understand your point. But you shouldn’t have to simply maintain certain qualities using the conjugate method.

For non elite lifters, getting bigger, stronger and more powerful during cycle shouldn’t be a huge problem.

Bear

Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.

Hey X,

Thanks.

I planned these blocks as a regular lifter. I felt that I was naturally explosive, so I cut out the DE work. Programs are all about individuality.

Actually, I have been reading up on blocks where intensity and volume fluctuates. I have learned that you can take that approach, or just progress linearly. (Add sets/reps/weight), which is the path I have chosen.

I felt that in a block that fluctuates weekly would take away from my goal of emphasizing a certain quality while maintaining others.

For example, 1 week may call for High Intensity and Medium Volume, another may call for High Volume and medium intensity. The distribution of training would be equally given to those qualities.

Thanks for your thoughts

[quote]xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.[/quote]

Just to clarify, I never mentioned volume or intensity for a reason. I was talking about overall training stress. You can’t continue adding volume indefinitely. I don’t know your current level of training but eventually you’ll reach a point where you burn out. That’s why you fluctuate training stress (which is composed of both volume and intensity) on a weekly basis.

Keep in mind that you’ll also become more neurologically efficient as time progresses, so the same volume of work will inflict greater fatigue on your body.

Overall training stress changing doesn’t mean that you can’t keep emphasizing the same goal throughout the training block. It means that as your overall stress is changing over weeks, you still devote the same (or roughly the same) percentage of that stress to your desired goals. There’s no reason you couldn’t be working up to 3RM’s or 1RM’s every week for 4 weeks to help maximal strength gain and still be fluctuating the training stress. In fact, it may just keep you healthy longer and training longer.

Finally, if you continue to add sets/weight/reps every week you’ll never be able to display any of the maximal strength that you gain. Fatigue masks fitness, you need to give yourself time to recover in order to realize the gains that you’re working hard for. This is why powerlifters may take 1, 2, or 3 weeks completely off before a meet. Obviously you don’t need to do that, but regular volume reductions are important so you can display your fitness.

Note: I’m trying to speak in generalities here because I know absolutely nothing about your particular situation.

Best of luck with your training.

[quote]thetruth24 wrote:
Hey X,

Thanks.

I planned these blocks as a regular lifter. I felt that I was naturally explosive, so I cut out the DE work. Programs are all about individuality.

Actually, I have been reading up on blocks where intensity and volume fluctuates. I have learned that you can take that approach, or just progress linearly. (Add sets/reps/weight), which is the path I have chosen.

I felt that in a block that fluctuates weekly would take away from my goal of emphasizing a certain quality while maintaining others.

For example, 1 week may call for High Intensity and Medium Volume, another may call for High Volume and medium intensity. The distribution of training would be equally given to those qualities.

Thanks for your thoughts

xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.

[/quote]

just out of curiosity on firday of block one when you do the 5x5 is it at a set weight or ramped to a heavy PR… also is this day done max effort or s;lightly less. ie if done at a set weight would it be less than your max 5x5?

Hey X,

I really appreciate your thoughts.

You bring up an interesting point. Would you mind “Showing” me how to fluctuate the stress or volume or intensity from week to week, while still maintaining the emphasis?

I actually designed my blocks for a 4th-5th week where there is a reduction in volume or overall training stress.

My blocks could in a way be classified as CNS INTENSIVE AND MUSCLE INTENSIVE. So in a way, some aspect of your body gets a break.

Thanks Bro

[quote]xizor00007 wrote:
Just to clarify, I never mentioned volume or intensity for a reason. I was talking about overall training stress. You can’t continue adding volume indefinitely. I don’t know your current level of training but eventually you’ll reach a point where you burn out. That’s why you fluctuate training stress (which is composed of both volume and intensity) on a weekly basis.

Keep in mind that you’ll also become more neurologically efficient as time progresses, so the same volume of work will inflict greater fatigue on your body.

Overall training stress changing doesn’t mean that you can’t keep emphasizing the same goal throughout the training block. It means that as your overall stress is changing over weeks, you still devote the same (or roughly the same) percentage of that stress to your desired goals. There’s no reason you couldn’t be working up to 3RM’s or 1RM’s every week for 4 weeks to help maximal strength gain and still be fluctuating the training stress. In fact, it may just keep you healthy longer and training longer.

Finally, if you continue to add sets/weight/reps every week you’ll never be able to display any of the maximal strength that you gain. Fatigue masks fitness, you need to give yourself time to recover in order to realize the gains that you’re working hard for. This is why powerlifters may take 1, 2, or 3 weeks completely off before a meet. Obviously you don’t need to do that, but regular volume reductions are important so you can display your fitness.

Note: I’m trying to speak in generalities here because I know absolutely nothing about your particular situation.

Best of luck with your training.

thetruth24 wrote:
Hey X,

Thanks.

I planned these blocks as a regular lifter. I felt that I was naturally explosive, so I cut out the DE work. Programs are all about individuality.

Actually, I have been reading up on blocks where intensity and volume fluctuates. I have learned that you can take that approach, or just progress linearly. (Add sets/reps/weight), which is the path I have chosen.

I felt that in a block that fluctuates weekly would take away from my goal of emphasizing a certain quality while maintaining others.

For example, 1 week may call for High Intensity and Medium Volume, another may call for High Volume and medium intensity. The distribution of training would be equally given to those qualities.

Thanks for your thoughts

xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.

[/quote]

Hey Iron,

I don’t plan to ramp up the weight each set, but if you wanted to, I don’t believe there would be a problem. Its just my personal preference.

I would just get about 80% of my 1RM on the exercise and hit 5x5 with some reps left in the tank.

Thanks.

[quote]IRoNStaLLion wrote:
just out of curiosity on firday of block one when you do the 5x5 is it at a set weight or ramped to a heavy PR… also is this day done max effort or s;lightly less. ie if done at a set weight would it be less than your max 5x5?[/quote]

[quote]xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.[/quote]

For a guy with limited time i dont see how all these could be catered for. If your going to be training multiple strength parameters, not enough displacement of the training state is going to be taking place in order to see a true progress. A jack of all trades master of none if you like.

[quote]

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.[/quote]

Prehab for what? based on what findings? Too much guess work at the minute i feel.
Could you expand a little on how you would incorperate some of your stratergies please.

Truth - you think too much mate. And finally Super training makes things clearer? since when…lol.

Truth,

One of the simplest ways to do this is one that Eric Cressey has mentioned on this site a few times, although I can’t find the thread now.
Basically…
Week 1: 100% (The stress you would use to get a training effect)
Week 2: 80% of week 1
Week 3: 120% of week 1
Week 4: 60% of week 1 (deload)

You get three weeks of training effect, and intentionally over-reach going into the fourth week. Now, as far as how to allocate the stress, let’s say you choose 2 max effort lifts (box squat and GM) and do them for 2 weeks each. You could take this any direction you want, triples on week 1, work up to a 3rm on week 2, singles on week 3, then maybe try for a squat pr at the end of week 4 if you’re feeling good. Again, this is just an example, there are a ton of ways to do this. Past that, you’d do most of your other work for your weaknesses and the places you need hypertrophy, you’d just do less of it on weeks 2 and 4, and more on weeks 1 and 3.

I didn’t realize you had planned for a deload week every 4th week. That changes things a little bit, but in my opinion it’s still not optimal. The reason is because you’ll wear yourself down. If week 4 is the highest, but week 3 is still pretty high, then you’ll still be feeling the effects of week 3 when you come back and try to ramp it up for week 4… you see what I’m saying? It’s not always a bad thing to do more than one high stress week in a row though, especially if you’re going to be out of the gym for a week or something.

[quote]thetruth24 wrote:
Hey X,

I really appreciate your thoughts.

You bring up an interesting point. Would you mind “Showing” me how to fluctuate the stress or volume or intensity from week to week, while still maintaining the emphasis?

I actually designed my blocks for a 4th-5th week where there is a reduction in volume or overall training stress.

My blocks could in a way be classified as CNS INTENSIVE AND MUSCLE INTENSIVE. So in a way, some aspect of your body gets a break.

Thanks Bro

[/quote]

[quote]supermick wrote:
xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

For a guy with limited time i dont see how all these could be catered for. If your going to be training multiple strength parameters, not enough displacement of the training state is going to be taking place in order to see a true progress. A jack of all trades master of none if you like. [/quote]

My bad for being confusing. I wasn’t suggesting that he take all those qualities and try to train them in one block. I was just trying to demonstrate that size and strength aren’t the only qualities to be trained/maintained. I know nothing about his particular situation so I just listed what came to mind.

Again, I was just mentioning prehab because I don’t know anything about this guy. In most cases, guys have some type of prehab that they do (for instance, I do external rotations and dorsiflexion variations regularly), maybe there are postural issues, or nagging injuries… You get the idea. Just covering all the bases I could think of, being as general as possible because I don’t know the situation.

[quote]xizor00007 wrote:
supermick wrote:
xizor00007 wrote:
Hey truth,

You’re right on with your definition of the conjugate sequence, but your “blocks” don’t reflect it. Size and strength are not the only 2 physical qualities out there. You’ve said nothing about dynamic, explosive strength, starting strength, reactive strength, strength-endurance, cardiovascular endurance, etc.

For a guy with limited time i dont see how all these could be catered for. If your going to be training multiple strength parameters, not enough displacement of the training state is going to be taking place in order to see a true progress. A jack of all trades master of none if you like.

My bad for being confusing. I wasn’t suggesting that he take all those qualities and try to train them in one block. I was just trying to demonstrate that size and strength aren’t the only qualities to be trained/maintained. I know nothing about his particular situation so I just listed what came to mind.

Furthermore, I think you’re missing the fact that conjugate sequences usually means you need to keep a close eye on overall training stress. Are you going to do one of these blocks as written for 4 weeks in a row? You need to fluctuate training stress on a weekly basis.

Finally, you also need to figure prehab and other work into the equation, as they don’t currently seem to have any room in your program.

You’re on the right track. Read Supertraining if you have access to a copy, things will become much clearer.

Prehab for what? based on what findings? Too much guess work at the minute i feel.
Could you expand a little on how you would incorperate some of your stratergies please.

Truth - you think too much mate. And finally Super training makes things clearer? since when…lol.

Again, I was just mentioning prehab because I don’t know anything about this guy. In most cases, guys have some type of prehab that they do (for instance, I do external rotations and dorsiflexion variations regularly), maybe there are postural issues, or nagging injuries… You get the idea. Just covering all the bases I could think of, being as general as possible because I don’t know the situation.

[/quote]

Thanks for your reply, your justification makes sense. Id also incorperate testing days and maybe monitor a few simple things to indicte training status (Ie morning heart rate, quality of sleep etc)…but at the end of the day their is only so many hours in one day.
The Cressey template loks nice too.

Hey Mick,

Im glad your here.

Any thoughts on the blocks? Suggestions or inputs?

Thanks!

Arggg.

Still having trouble of grasping the idea of fluctuating volume and intensity on a weekly basis, while still staying true to the emphasis.

I read up on Jack Reape’s articles, where he kind of explains this idea, but doesnt provide a sample block.

Types of Blocks

Linear Progression vs Wavelike Block

It seems that a block that adds sets/reps/weight, has a straightforward progresson.

A wavelike block that has intensity and volume fluctuate constantly, seems to keep your body from adapting rather then really progressing.

James Smith tells me that its like undulating the rep/set schemes from week to week.

Check out Powerdevelopmentinc.com
-Click on Symposium on the top of the page.
-Find the thread titled Conjugate Sequence System/Block Training
-Then find the topic titled CNS Factorization, Example of CSS, Applying Conjugate Sequence System

Informative Stuff