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Confused About Total Poundages

Obviously I’m a bit confused. I recently read an article here on T-Nation (I forget which one) where it suggested taking the weight X sets X reps=total poundages. That seemed simple enough but then i got bored and compared my weight lifting poundages to pushup weight X reps X sets.

Needless to say I found out something very interesting…for example if I do, say 400 pushups a day at a bodyweight 215 so probably a push up wieght at 150 I got 60000 lbs. Compared to my bench weight of 275X4X6=6600 lbs…it seems like pushups because of there pure volume cause me to do more work…what am i doing wrong with the formulas? am I looking at this differently than i’m supposed to?
Thanksf for your help and answers

Give it a try and let us know how it goes… :wink:

[quote]stone89 wrote:
Obviously I’m a bit confused. I recently read an article here on T-Nation (I forget which one) where it suggested taking the weight X sets X reps=total poundages. That seemed simple enough but then i got bored and compared my weight lifting poundages to pushup weight X reps X sets.

Needless to say I found out something very interesting…for example if I do, say 400 pushups a day at a bodyweight 215 so probably a push up wieght at 150 I got 60000 lbs. Compared to my bench weight of 275X4X6=6600 lbs…it seems like pushups because of there pure volume cause me to do more work…what am i doing wrong with the formulas? am I looking at this differently than i’m supposed to?
Thanksf for your help and answers
[/quote]

You are looking at it correctly, and what this points out very clearly is the axiom that you sacrafice volume for intensity.

What you are missing is intensity(working load in relation to 1 rep maximum strength).

There are certain intensities that have been well researched and tested as being better for size/strength(6-12 rep range) or strength/neural effeciency(1-6 rep range) and endurance(greater than 12) and other factors such as increasing blood supply(capillaries)and cellular energy production(mitochondria).

The reasons for this is the different intensities stimulate different types of muscle fibers which each have different potentials for total growth.

This doesn’t mean there isn’t overlap in stimulus but these rep guidelines are very effective at designing specific programs for specific goals.

For all but complete beginners the intensity of pushups will be at a level that is not effecient for gaining maximum strength and size regardless of workload.

[quote]stone89 wrote:
what am i doing wrong with the formulas? am I looking at this differently than i’m supposed to?
Thanksf for your help and answers
[/quote]

Yes! Only a moron would use total volume to calculate the effectiveness of the routine. You are not taking into account the value of the heavier loads which in fact can produce better results even with far less than half of the volume of another routine with a lot lighter load.

Nobody ever talks about this because frankly it won’t help sell their ideas.

Bench Press 500 lbs x 50 reps a week = 25,000 lbs.

Bench Press 10 lbs x 5000 reps a week = 50,000 lbs.

I used extremes to illustrate my point.

The value of heavy weights holds a higher value than lightweights when calculating volume. there is no formula for this. If there was, morons would stop using total volume as a benchmark for superiority.

[quote]stone89 wrote:
Obviously I’m a bit confused. I recently read an article here on T-Nation (I forget which one) where it suggested taking the weight X sets X reps=total poundages. That seemed simple enough…[/quote]

It is a pretty simple method for determining the relative intensity of a workout, but it works best when compared to a similar workout. Dan John talked about this in his 5x5 article:
http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-076-training

He’s referring to 5x5 (but it’s applicable to most training systems): “Get out a calculator and figure the weight times the reps and add them up over the five sets. That number is a nice little measure of progress. As that number goes up, in any of the variations, you’re getting “stronger.””

Basically, if you can do more sets, reps, and/or weight today than you did yesterday, then you’re improving.

Not to harp on the small stuff, but if you’re doing a traditional, toes on the floor push-up, then you’re not lifting all of your bodyweight, just a majority of it. Your legs don’t really factor into the resistance, so that would throw off the calculations. (Wow, I just majored on the minor stuff. Go me!)

[quote]Colucci wrote:

…for example if I do, say 400 pushups a day at a bodyweight 215…

Not to harp on the small stuff, but if you’re doing a traditional, toes on the floor push-up, then you’re not lifting all of your bodyweight, just a majority of it. Your legs don’t really factor into the resistance, so that would throw off the calculations. (Wow, I just majored on the minor stuff. Go me!)[/quote]

er yeah i know. thats why if you read my post you see i said the weight turns out to be only 150 pounds