T Nation

Computer Science vs Chemical Engineering


#1

Hello everyone, love this Forum topic as there are so many shared life experiences that one can learn from. So here I am hoping that someone can help shed some of their own life experience in my direction...

I am currently 24 years of age, working in the Air Force, overseas in the Republic of Korea. I went to the Pennsylvania State University, and studied security risk analysis with an emphasis on intelligent analytic modeling. Unfortunately I was unable to graduate, due to my own fault. I was unable to finish my degree due to 1 class requirements (passing with a C) that I was unable to pass, and my inability to secure an internship (also a graduate requirement)due to my less than stellar GPA. I was lazy, immature, and quite more preoccupied with living out the college experience. Not going to class consistently, leaving my studying to the last minute, and going out to party most of the days of the week. This being said I had a wakeup call, when I found myself jobless/degreeless after 4 years. My overall GPA was a measly 2.6 in change. This was a dramatic change from my success in high school, as I graduated in the top 10 of my class, and scored over a 2000 on my SAT. I am not an unintelligent person, I do believe that I lacked the maturity and was unable to deal with all my new found freedom away from home. Looking back college did change me, it was not all bad. I do feel like I gained a lot of life experience, but at a heavy cost.

Fast forward to the present, I am currently serving my 4 year term in the Air Force because I saw it as my only viable option for a second chance. A second chance is not something that not too many people get. I would not allow for my parents to support my schooling financially, after poorly performing academically for 4 years (& neither would they). I have two younger siblings, that both deserve their chance at attending a university of their choice. By serving my 4 year term (trying to separate early after my 3 years of Active Duty for my full 9/11 GI Bill to acquire a higher education) I will have an opportunity to head back to school paid in full(tuition/books/monthly stipend) and have my second chance. I have changed since my adolescent days; I now have the discipline and work ethic that is required to succeed. I have experienced the type of life I do not want to have. All my failures have fueled me, and have made me motivated to do my very best. I will be transferring my credits from Penn State to City College of NY (where I reside). Where I will graduate with a degree in an engineering specialty. I am here hoping to grab some insight in the form of which specialty I should pursue.

I have always been interested in medicine, so biomedical was my first choice. After conducting some research it does not seem as there are many jobs open currently in biomedical engineering, as it is still a relatively new field. Gaining entry into an entry level job is an important criterion of mine. As I have been paying my student loans, and will need to continue after I graduate. My next two choices are between chemical engineering or computer science. I know there are some members here that have graduated with a computer engineer or computer science degree. I was hoping I could have some real insight on what your experience has been in your respective field (from beginning to where you are currently). I am also very interested in knowing if we have any members who have a degree in chemical engineering. I am well aware that all the majors I have listed are at the very least, of above average difficulty in obtaining. This time will be different, as I am willing to not only put in the work required but to master my craft. Any insight would be greatly appreciated and beneficial. Insight pertaining to: job security, job outlook over the next few years, salary, promotion capability, and how easy is it to secure an entry level position at a competitive company? I have conducted my own research, but would like to hear some firsthand experience from those who actually work in those specific fields.

I also hope to be a reminder to those on this site, that being intelligent (regardless of how you define the word) is simply not enough. You must be willing work, and work hard. Time has and always will be the greatest commodity. There is only a limited amount, and I myself wasted 4 years that I will never get back. I will be 26-27 attending college once more, and this will be a constant reminder of my past failure that I will face every day, and hopefully atone for. I hope my life experience can serve as a warning to the younger members on this site, that success does not come easy, that not everyone is so lucky in getting a second chance, and if that you are deemed lucky enough for a second chance, that you don't squander it.


#2

jzy50309 Wrote

"I also hope to be a reminder to those on this site, that being intelligent (regardless of how you define the word) is simply not enough. You must be willing work, and work hard. Time has and always will be the greatest commodity. There is only a limited amount, and I myself wasted 4 years that I will never get back. I will be 26-27 attending college once more, and this will be a constant reminder of my past failure that I will face every day, and hopefully atone for.

I hope my life experience can serve as a warning to the younger members on this site, that success does not come easy, that not everyone is so lucky in getting a second chance, and if that you are deemed lucky enough for a second chance, that you don’t squander it."

I was surprised to see that one responded to your thread. In am not involved with working for a company. I do a lot of volunteer work. I love it and my life has been blessed by it.

I just want to say that it was really nice of you to care enough about someone else to write what you wrote above. I hope that a lot of people respond to your thread. I wish you the best in all that you do!


#3

[quote]Glittergirl69 wrote:

I was surprised to see that one responded to your thread. In am not involved with working for a company. I do a lot of volunteer work. I love it and my life has been blessed by it.

I just wanted to say that it was really nice of you to cared enough about someone else to write what you wrote above. I hope that a lot of people responded to your thread. I wish you the best in all that you do![/quote]
Thank you very much for your support. I have heard volunteering your time to a cause you believe in is one of the most fulfilling things one can do with their life.


#4

I got a 2-year degree right out of HS, not the best of grades, but I passed and got the diploma. Fast forward 10 years after that, I went back to school and got 2 more degrees, all paid by my company. But if I got less than a B in anything, they only paid so much of the tuition. I was highly motivated and did well.

A chemical engineering degree is very versatile if you don’t mind moving somewhere to get a good job.


#5

jzy -
You might get more response from people in those fields if you edit your thread title to read something like “Engineering Degree vs Computer Science?” That will make it more likely for the people in those fields to see your thread.

Also, search this forum for similar threads. This topic has come up fairly recently I believe.

Best of luck!
Puff


#6

[quote]beachguy498 wrote:
I got a 2-year degree right out of HS, not the best of grades, but I passed and got the diploma. Fast forward 10 years after that, I went back to school and got 2 more degrees, all paid by my company. But if I got less than a B in anything, they only paid so much of the tuition. I was highly motivated and did well.

A chemical engineering degree is very versatile if you don’t mind moving somewhere to get a good job.[/quote]
Thanks for the input, I see that you are from New York as well. Did you have a problem finding an entry level position in New York? I would rather not move, and save up for a few months to have some savings in the bank. I would think given New York/New Jersey being such large economic driven states that they would have more than a few job listings for either chemical engineering or computer science. Is that not the case, in your experience?


#7

[quote]Powerpuff wrote:
jzy -
You might get more response from people in those fields if you edit your thread title to read something like “Engineering Degree vs Computer Science?” That will make it more likely for the people in those fields to see your thread.

Also, search this forum for similar threads. This topic has come up fairly recently I believe.

Best of luck!
Puff [/quote]
I appreciate the sound advice, and will see how to go about changing the thread topic’s name. Thanks for the post and support


#8

My undergraduate degree is computer engineering. I hated chemistry, so I’m the wrong person to ask about that.
Computer engineering is a versatile degree, since it is similar to a dual degree between computer science and electrical engineering. In corporate environments, that often means a higher starting salary. In most cases, however, you will probably be hired as a programmer, unless you get into some kind of embedded systems work. Computer engineering had a reputation as being harder than pre-med at my university, because the kind of thinking one does in computer science is often very different from the kind of thinking one does in electrical engineering. Many people ended up switching programs to either computer science or electrical engineering, depending on their strengths. Electrical engineering is more math heavy in terms of calculus and differential equations, whereas computer science is more abstract (algorithm classes typically require proofs).

As I advised another poster, going into “computer science” (regardless of what your actual degree says) usually means becoming a programmer. If you don’t particularly like programming, you’ll be in a race to get to management. The field is still fairly lucrative, though I now work in a related but specialized area, so I’m not as in the loop about starting salaries for CS grads.


#9

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:

[quote]beachguy498 wrote:
I got a 2-year degree right out of HS, not the best of grades, but I passed and got the diploma. Fast forward 10 years after that, I went back to school and got 2 more degrees, all paid by my company. But if I got less than a B in anything, they only paid so much of the tuition. I was highly motivated and did well.

A chemical engineering degree is very versatile if you don’t mind moving somewhere to get a good job.[/quote]
Thanks for the input, I see that you are from New York as well. Did you have a problem finding an entry level position in New York? I would rather not move, and save up for a few months to have some savings in the bank. I would think given New York/New Jersey being such large economic driven states that they would have more than a few job listings for either chemical engineering or computer science. Is that not the case, in your experience?
[/quote]
The economic sector may be large, but you have to be consider and prepared for the reality that the volume of competition for those positions will be very high.

As far as your decision, I weigh these things on a personalized criteria of longevity, difficulty, time, and cohesiveness. I personally disregard interest as it is a useless vector for my situation. For you, I would incorporate it. How much do you already know about the two fields of study? Which one interests you more?

Longevity. What are your goals beyond attaining an entry level position in the field? Which field provides the most carryover and support for those ambitions and their respective lifestyle? Both Chem E and CS have fairly broad scope, so this may not be super obvious from the get go.

Difficulty. From my own experience and the experiences of others, most engineering degrees seem objectively more different in terms of core content and diversity than most of the CS programs I’ve seen although a lot of coursework in CS definitely partitions of great deal of time commitment. Not super obvious either. It will depend ultimately upon your strengths, how much you like working with the material, and the strategies you are able to implement towards your success.

Time. Which one can you complete faster? Having one less semester is awesome. Having two less is even better. This depends on the coursework that you have already completed as well as how the departments handle pre-reqs and transfer credits. Some departments don’t accept any external program credits at all. It also depends on how often certain classes are available. Maybe you will be able to take a pre-req for a course that is only give during the fall over the summer. Maybe you won’t. It’s dicey. Be thorough in your planning, but I’m sure I don’t have to tell you. The quicker you get the degree, the quicker you can get on with your life. Spending less money is pretty great too.

Cohesiveness. This one is super important to me. Basically, how well does your field of study adhere to your goals and lifestyle? Do you feel out of place? Do you feel like you are wasting your time? If so, you may not have made the best choice. Everything that you are doing now should feel as though it is driving towards a single point. There should be no divergence.

That’s a simplified version of my decision process. Now, you want to stay near your home, which is understandable. Just be prepared to have limited options. Limited does not mean shitty or few however. Shop around. If you find a program that you think looks good, add that school to your list then keep looking. Rule out other options first before you proceed with one that you like.

My industry advice to you is simple. Regardless of what you choose to study, build a portfolio. Seriously. Having examples of your work can not only get potential employers to overlook a not so great GPA and help recruiters get you in front of people that are looking for your skill set; it gives you something of actual value to discuss during the interview process. The employers will get an accurate view of what you can provide, and in turn, the resulting conversation will give you an idea of what working there would be like before you even start.

I hope at least a scratch of this helps. I know at least a fair bit by now in spite of my limited experience. I can really tell that you are very motivated and serious about accomplishing what you have set out to do. I’m sure you will do well with whatever you choose. Here’s add one last tidbit. Don’t overlook the strength of a math degree. If you want a broad array of options, applied mathematics is definitely a solid choice.

Good luck.


#10

[quote]nephorm wrote:
My undergraduate degree is computer engineering. I hated chemistry, so I’m the wrong person to ask about that.
Computer engineering is a versatile degree, since it is similar to a dual degree between computer science and electrical engineering. In corporate environments, that often means a higher starting salary. In most cases, however, you will probably be hired as a programmer, unless you get into some kind of embedded systems work. Computer engineering had a reputation as being harder than pre-med at my university, because the kind of thinking one does in computer science is often very different from the kind of thinking one does in electrical engineering. Many people ended up switching programs to either computer science or electrical engineering, depending on their strengths. Electrical engineering is more math heavy in terms of calculus and differential equations, whereas computer science is more abstract (algorithm classes typically require proofs).

As I advised another poster, going into “computer science” (regardless of what your actual degree says) usually means becoming a programmer. If you don’t particularly like programming, you’ll be in a race to get to management. The field is still fairly lucrative, though I now work in a related but specialized area, so I’m not as in the loop about starting salaries for CS grads. [/quote]

This sums up ECE pretty well. My B.S. is in Electrical & Computer Engineering(same program) but I focused on power systems. Like nephrom was saying, ECE and CS are programming heavy, so if you’re into that, it is a great career.

I know there are no shortage of jobs(and pay) in Chemical, Electrical and Computer Engineering. With minimal experience, you will be sought out by headhunters.


#11

[quote]nephorm wrote:
My undergraduate degree is computer engineering. I hated chemistry, so I’m the wrong person to ask about that.
Computer engineering is a versatile degree, since it is similar to a dual degree between computer science and electrical engineering. In corporate environments, that often means a higher starting salary. In most cases, however, you will probably be hired as a programmer, unless you get into some kind of embedded systems work. Computer engineering had a reputation as being harder than pre-med at my university, because the kind of thinking one does in computer science is often very different from the kind of thinking one does in electrical engineering. Many people ended up switching programs to either computer science or electrical engineering, depending on their strengths. Electrical engineering is more math heavy in terms of calculus and differential equations, whereas computer science is more abstract (algorithm classes typically require proofs).

As I advised another poster, going into “computer science” (regardless of what your actual degree says) usually means becoming a programmer. If you don’t particularly like programming, you’ll be in a race to get to management. The field is still fairly lucrative, though I now work in a related but specialized area, so I’m not as in the loop about starting salaries for CS grads. [/quote]
Truly appreciate all the input, I have a lot to think about. I still have a couple of years till my contract with the Air Force is over. I will be spending my time researching, and staying hungry to start my journey to success. I am leaning towards the Chemical Engineering side, but a Computer Science degree has its pros to me as well. I am shying away from Computer Engineering only because I would rather work with software versus hardware.

If it would not be too much trouble could you provide me with some more insight in how you started at the beginning of your career versus what you are doing currently? If you could go back in time, is there anything you would do different?


#12

I really had no problem with finding work. My original 2-year degree definitely got me interviews and my first good job at age 26. I passed up a few jobs in NY and CT since I wasn’t keen on relocating.

The next degrees I got when I was working and they actually had a career development program. So what I was doing went along with my schooling. I was essentially doing engineering work before I got the diploma.


#13

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:
If it would not be too much trouble could you provide me with some more insight in how you started at the beginning of your career versus what you are doing currently? If you could go back in time, is there anything you would do different? [/quote]

I started with a small company in one of the worst times to enter the computer science/engineering job market in the US (2003). In the aftermath of September 11th, lots of defense contracts had been cut or suspended to redirect resources to combating terrorism. The tech bubble had burst. Where large companies were hiring, they were looking for people who already had security clearances, because it was a nightmare getting anyone cleared to work, and government contracts required people who were ready to work. This was a sharp contrast to the environment just before 9/11, when computer science grads were routinely hired and stuck in “the room” (a computer lab to surf the internet) for six months until the clearance came through.

When I was a sophomore in college, everyone knew that a computer-engineering graduate would earn between 50k and 60k to start (approx. 70-80k in today’s money), but by the time I graduated, offers were typically in the range of 30-40K for new graduates without clearances. Lots and lots of places were hiring CS and EE graduates to do technical support at low wages, luring people in with misleading job descriptions. Companies had “waiting lists,” and would call and ask you to accept a position for a possible contract that they’d bid for, but probably weren’t going to get. I picked up a job application from Blockbusters. I interviewed with a technical support office for my county school system that I’d worked for in high school.

It was not a good time.

So I took a job with a very, very small company for very little pay. I did interesting work that I enjoyed, but it became clear that they were never going to make me a partner in the company, nor did they have enough money to pay me my market value after a couple of years had passed and starting salaries had increased. I was making less at my job after the first year (and raise) than the starting salary of a friend who graduated the following year.

I interviewed with a large company, and I got the job and a bump in pay. Great people there, but I hated the work. I also felt a bit duped in terms of the actual work I ended up doing, but that’s a different issue.

After almost two years there, I decided to take a job in intellectual property, where I’ve stayed since.

So that’s my story, but it almost certainly doesn’t apply to you.

If I could go back in time, I would’ve done many, many things differently. But not much regarding my career path. If I’d been more diligent in my studies and been a top student, my choices after graduation would have been much different. But then, I’ve remarked to friends that if I’d known as a high school senior how my life would turn out, I would’ve focused more on maximizing income than pursuing my technical interests.


#14

[quote]spar4tee wrote:
The economic sector may be large, but you have to be consider and prepared for the reality that the volume of competition for those positions will be very high.

As far as your decision, I weigh these things on a personalized criteria of longevity, difficulty, time, and cohesiveness. I personally disregard interest as it is a useless vector for my situation. For you, I would incorporate it. How much do you already know about the two fields of study? Which one interests you more?

Longevity. What are your goals beyond attaining an entry level position in the field? Which field provides the most carryover and support for those ambitions and their respective lifestyle? Both Chem E and CS have fairly broad scope, so this may not be super obvious from the get go.

Difficulty. From my own experience and the experiences of others, most engineering degrees seem objectively more different in terms of core content and diversity than most of the CS programs I’ve seen although a lot of coursework in CS definitely partitions of great deal of time commitment. Not super obvious either. It will depend ultimately upon your strengths, how much you like working with the material, and the strategies you are able to implement towards your success.

Time. Which one can you complete faster? Having one less semester is awesome. Having two less is even better. This depends on the coursework that you have already completed as well as how the departments handle pre-reqs and transfer credits. Some departments don’t accept any external program credits at all. It also depends on how often certain classes are available. Maybe you will be able to take a pre-req for a course that is only give during the fall over the summer. Maybe you won’t. It’s dicey. Be thorough in your planning, but I’m sure I don’t have to tell you. The quicker you get the degree, the quicker you can get on with your life. Spending less money is pretty great too.

Cohesiveness. This one is super important to me. Basically, how well does your field of study adhere to your goals and lifestyle? Do you feel out of place? Do you feel like you are wasting your time? If so, you may not have made the best choice. Everything that you are doing now should feel as though it is driving towards a single point. There should be no divergence.

That’s a simplified version of my decision process. Now, you want to stay near your home, which is understandable. Just be prepared to have limited options. Limited does not mean shitty or few however. Shop around. If you find a program that you think looks good, add that school to your list then keep looking. Rule out other options first before you proceed with one that you like.

My industry advice to you is simple. Regardless of what you choose to study, build a portfolio. Seriously. Having examples of your work can not only get potential employers to overlook a not so great GPA and help recruiters get you in front of people that are looking for your skill set; it gives you something of actual value to discuss during the interview process. The employers will get an accurate view of what you can provide, and in turn, the resulting conversation will give you an idea of what working there would be like before you even start.

I hope at least a scratch of this helps. I know at least a fair bit by now in spite of my limited experience. I can really tell that you are very motivated and serious about accomplishing what you have set out to do. I’m sure you will do well with whatever you choose. Here’s add one last tidbit. Don’t overlook the strength of a math degree. If you want a broad array of options, applied mathematics is definitely a solid choice.

Good luck.[/quote]
Thank you very much sir for your very thorough and helpful response. I would like to think that we both have very similar thought processes. I have weighed out all these options, maybe not to the extent that I need to but they have been unresolved lingering in the back of my mind.

Longevity: I want a career path where I have a chance to work my way up a promotion chain. I know both Computer Science/Chemical Engineering are both great entry level positions that will give me a “foot in the door” for my rise up a successful firm/corporation. I do not plan on letting off the gas after I graduate and secure a job. I do believe that both degrees will allow me the ability for promotion. If this is not the case, or believe this is not so please inform me otherwise.

Difficulty: I am well aware and informed in the difficulty regarding in obtaining a degree in either Chemical Engineering or Computer Science. Neither are “easy” degrees, but I know some Electrical Engineers and Computer Engineers and do not consider them to be much more inherently intelligently gifted than myself. That being said, I am much more dedicated to not only obtaining a degree in one of these two fields, but being one of the best. I will put in the work, I will have no other choice in this matter.

Time: This factor is the one that keeps me up at night. I have wasted 4 years of my life going to a college to obtain nothing. I have about 130 credits with nothing to show for it. When I finally separate from the military I will be 27 going on 28. I do not expect many of my credits to transfer over to City College of NY(due to heading into a new major), I will be inherently starting from scratch. Fortunately due to my service I will have 9 semesters of school paid for in full, along with books and with a substantial monthly living stipend. I have more than enough time to complete my new degree, in that time frame. I am fully aware that I may be graduating at the ripe age of 30 if not later. I do not have time to waste, and unfortunately can not start now (due to finishing my term with the AF).

Cohesiveness: When I was younger I had large dreams and aspirations. To be financially well off, to be working in a career field where I was tested, one where I mattered and was respected. Somewhere in those cloudy 4 years of college I lost myself, my determination, time and hunger. The one thing I can thank the Air Force for is showing me what I don’t want out of life. I live a life that I do not love and am not happy. I currently go to work every day in a field that I consider to be beneath me, and I only have myself to blame for that. Everything I have is because of the choices I made, if I am to change that I will need to start making different ones. I want a job where I am tested day in and day out. I want the recognition of being successful in a difficult career which not everyone can do. I have a chance to prove this to myself, that my life is in my hands and not anyone else’s.

Spar4tree, your advice has not fallen on deaf ears. I have taken the time to thoroughly consider all your advice, and will apply it. I am thankful for your support, and I am now just doing the hardest thing to start…waiting.


#15

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:
Spar4tree, your advice has not fallen on deaf ears. I have taken the time to thoroughly consider all your advice, and will apply it. I am thankful for your support, and I am now just doing the hardest thing to start…waiting.
[/quote]
Glad to be of help, man. I feel you on the crux of waiting. Just do when you can for now. Stick to the plan with the best of your ability, but don’t hesitate to fine-tune along the way. If the plan is not yet in full effect, there’s no harm in altering critical variables.


#16

[quote]nephorm wrote:
After almost two years there, I decided to take a job in intellectual property, where I’ve stayed since.

So that’s my story, but it almost certainly doesn’t apply to you.

If I could go back in time, I would’ve done many, many things differently. But not much regarding my career path. If I’d been more diligent in my studies and been a top student, my choices after graduation would have been much different. But then, I’ve remarked to friends that if I’d known as a high school senior how my life would turn out, I would’ve focused more on maximizing income than pursuing my technical interests.[/quote]

Working in I.P (intellectual property) is something I had a lot of interest in when I first went to college. I know there is a lot of money to be made there, with the new IP laws that were put in place recently. Can you speak more about how you got into that specific field of interest? You also speak of making as much monetary gain as possible, what would you do different to achieve this than you did previously? I would money not to be an issue for me or my family, as I still have student loans to still pay off and would like to start helping out my family.


#17

[quote]spar4tee wrote:

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:
Spar4tree, your advice has not fallen on deaf ears. I have taken the time to thoroughly consider all your advice, and will apply it. I am thankful for your support, and I am now just doing the hardest thing to start…waiting.
[/quote]
Glad to be of help, man. I feel you on the crux of waiting. Just do when you can for now. Stick to the plan with the best of your ability, but don’t hesitate to fine-tune along the way. If the plan is not yet in full effect, there’s no harm in altering critical variables.[/quote]
Thanks brother, I appreciate all the advice. You’ve given me a lot to think about, and would like to wish you good luck in all your future ventures as well.


#18

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:
Working in I.P (intellectual property) is something I had a lot of interest in when I first went to college. I know there is a lot of money to be made there, with the new IP laws that were put in place recently. Can you speak more about how you got into that specific field of interest? You also speak of making as much monetary gain as possible, what would you do different to achieve this than you did previously? I would money not to be an issue for me or my family, as I still have student loans to still pay off and would like to start helping out my family.
[/quote]

Honestly, I got into it by interviewing. They needed someone with my degree. I’m going to stop there for privacy reasons. The best IP opportunities are for lawyers, but there are other things you can get into once you have the technical qualifications. The intelproplaw.com forums have some good information about that.

The reason I say I would’ve maximized income is because I do not have a family. I probably would’ve gotten an MBA. Other people probably have better advice on this, but good quants on wall street make a lot. Surgeons make a lot (after they pay off med school). Dentists make a lot. A good plumber can make a bundle. There are actually lots of careers that can make you a lot of money if you are a) willing to do things other people won’t do, and/or b) willing to work very hard to be at the top, and c) have some luck. You can strike it rich in computer science, but only incidentally; you get rich by being creative and having a profitable idea, or by working for someone who does. In the first case, it is your creativity that makes you rich, even if inspired by some technical knowledge. And in the second case, it is luck. There are some people who make high salaries because of their extensive or specialized technical skills, but much of that is choosing the right skills that happen to be in demand at the right time, which seems more like guessing than planning. But you can make a comfortable living.


#19

[quote]nephorm wrote:
Honestly, I got into it by interviewing. They needed someone with my degree. I’m going to stop there for privacy reasons. The best IP opportunities are for lawyers, but there are other things you can get into once you have the technical qualifications. The intelproplaw.com forums have some good information about that.

The reason I say I would’ve maximized income is because I do not have a family. I probably would’ve gotten an MBA. Other people probably have better advice on this, but good quants on wall street make a lot. Surgeons make a lot (after they pay off med school). Dentists make a lot. A good plumber can make a bundle. There are actually lots of careers that can make you a lot of money if you are a) willing to do things other people won’t do, and/or b) willing to work very hard to be at the top, and c) have some luck. You can strike it rich in computer science, but only incidentally; you get rich by being creative and having a profitable idea, or by working for someone who does. In the first case, it is your creativity that makes you rich, even if inspired by some technical knowledge. And in the second case, it is luck. There are some people who make high salaries because of their extensive or specialized technical skills, but much of that is choosing the right skills that happen to be in demand at the right time, which seems more like guessing than planning. But you can make a comfortable living. [/quote]
Thank you for clearing that up, I am just trying to find the best path to reaching success, in both regards to financially and stability. The hard work is a given, and this is something that I have been patiently waiting for in order to start. I’d just like the quickest path there, regardless of the difficulty or obstacles I may encounter. Hard work can overcome all obstacles in my opinion, and I know I have the intellectual capacity to make this a reality. I do not have an immediate family as well, I am more so speaking of my parents and siblings. My parents make a very good living (both are in the medical field), I would just like to exceed the past generation. Appreciate all the advice you’ve given me, I will do my best to use it to its full extent.


#20

[quote]jzy50309 wrote:

[quote]Glittergirl69 wrote:

I was surprised to see that one responded to your thread. In am not involved with working for a company. I do a lot of volunteer work. I love it and my life has been blessed by it.

I just wanted to say that it was really nice of you to cared enough about someone else to write what you wrote above. I hope that a lot of people responded to your thread. I wish you the best in all that you do![/quote]
Thank you very much for your support. I have heard volunteering your time to a cause you believe in is one of the most fulfilling things one can do with their life. [/quote]

I just LOVE it so much! I was a big sister [Big Brother Big Sister organization] for 7 years. Now my “little sister” just went to college last year. We developed a very close friendship and have remained in contact with each other. I teach Sunday school for a group of mentally challenged adults- it is so rewarding!!! Two years ago I started an activity group for them which I lead. Doing both of these things is the best thing ever! There are other things that I do too, but I am not suppose to let my left hand know what my right hand is doing…you know what I mean?

I am very glad that some people replied to your post.