T Nation

Compound Exercise Overload Workout?

Hey guys,
I found this workout on Nick Nilsons’ website, and the results just seems unbelievable. So I’m looking for some input and whether or not I should do this workout, or does it simply lead to overtraining and burnout.
Here’s the link (under Compound Exercise Overload - One of THE Most Stunningly Powerful Single Workouts You Will EVER DO)
www.fitstep.com/Misc/Newsletter-archives/issue50.htm#1

Much appreciated

Have a nice day =)
–Mond

I don’t like it. It’s obviously a plateau-buster and not a full-time routine, but I don’t see how completely running yourself into the ground will work better than slightly and temporarily adding volume, switching out lifts, or taking a day to a week off when it comes to breaking through a plateau. I think nearly everyone is better off hammering out constant progression on a routine with sensible volume than jumping from shock routine to shock routine.

Well I have been consistently training for almost a year, and lately I’ve been stuck on a plateau. I’ve tried doing the opposite of what I was doing for 4 weeks (high reps instead of low, isolation before compounds and whatnot) but it doesn’t seem to do the trick. So I’m thinking about doing this routine, unless there’s some good reason why I shouldn’t do it.

I don’t quite get why the rest intervals is so short and the volume is so high. Wouldn’t it be more sensible to have a minute rest in between? Which comes up to be around 120 reps in total,still a relatively high volume. Can someone provide some insight into this?

M

[quote]Mondy wrote:

I don’t quite get why the rest intervals is so short and the volume is so high. Wouldn’t it be more sensible to have a minute rest in between? Which comes up to be around 120 reps in total,still a relatively high volume. Can someone provide some insight into this?

M[/quote]

It strikes me as an exaggerated EDT with more than twice the volume. I suppose it’s meant to take you out of your comfort zone of complete or nearly-complete rest between sets.

You say you’ve been stuck at a plateau for some time. Do you mean a certain lift, or your entire routine?

On most of my lifts (bench, squat, deadlift). Perhaps it has something to do with a 2 month layoff and 20pounds of fat over the summer.

I could see a long layoff knocking your strength levels back, but I would expect them to rebound once you got back into serious training. The stagnation could be due to a loss of general fitness, what with the weight gain and all, but I’d be surprised if that was the case.

Would you mind laying out your current routine?

CORTISOL should be of some concern here…
When working to failure or (rest pause (DC) type training) your body does shock! It compensates by releasing cortisol which can be catabolic and can aid in storing fat! Cortisol levels greatly vary from person to person some notice it when their body is drenched in it. It’s just a stress hormone and it is real… If you are training to failure it should be of “some” concern. Regardless of what haters might say ha!

I wouldn’t say don’t do it…
Try it, hell I’ll try anything once.
Sounds challenging, and I would def take the two day rest afterwards, then the following week get back to your normal routine.

[quote]Randizo wrote:
CORTISOL should be of some concern here…
When working to failure or (rest pause (DC) type training) your body does shock! It compensates by releasing cortisol which can be catabolic and can aid in storing fat!
[/quote]

Come on

[quote]Scott M wrote:
Randizo wrote:
CORTISOL should be of some concern here…
When working to failure or (rest pause (DC) type training) your body does shock! It compensates by releasing cortisol which can be catabolic and can aid in storing fat!

Come on
[/quote]

no comment…

My current routine is a 3 days split:

Chest/Back
Bench press 3-5 sets 5-15reps (adding weight each set)
Pullups 5xas many as possible
Incline dummbell press 3x8
Some type of rowing 4x8
Dips 2x10
Another type of rowing 2x10

Legs
ATG squats 5 sets 5-15reps adding weight each set
Stiff leg deadlift 5-15reps adding weight each set
Hamstring leg curl 3x8
Lunge/one leg squat 3x8
Calve raises 5-8 sets of 2-4 exercises with 5-20 reps

Arms/shoulder
Military press 5 sets with 4-8 reps, adding weight each set
High pull 5 sets of 4-8 reps,adding weight each set
Incline one-arm laterals 3x10
Curls 3-8 sets 2/3 exercises
Tricep extension 3-8 sets 2/3 exercises

I also do some isometric ab work (planks, ab wheel) around once a week
I also do some external rotations every so and then

How often do you train till failure?

I never train to failure, always keeping a rep or two in the tank.

[quote]Mondy wrote:
My current routine is a 3 days split:

Chest/Back
Bench press 3-5 sets 5-15reps (adding weight each set)
Pullups 5xas many as possible
Incline dummbell press 3x8
Some type of rowing 4x8
Dips 2x10
Another type of rowing 2x10

Legs
ATG squats 5 sets 5-15reps adding weight each set
Stiff leg deadlift 5-15reps adding weight each set
Hamstring leg curl 3x8
Lunge/one leg squat 3x8
Calve raises 5-8 sets of 2-4 exercises with 5-20 reps

Arms/shoulder
Military press 5 sets with 4-8 reps, adding weight each set
High pull 5 sets of 4-8 reps,adding weight each set
Incline one-arm laterals 3x10
Curls 3-8 sets 2/3 exercises
Tricep extension 3-8 sets 2/3 exercises

I also do some isometric ab work (planks, ab wheel) around once a week
I also do some external rotations every so and then[/quote]

Well, first of all, I like your routine. Very basic, very solid. Just a couple of thoughts:

Consolidate the lifts into a push/pull/legs split. Choose the upper body push that contributes the most to your size/strength, make that you primary lift for the day, then work the rest of your pushing exercises at a lighter level, perhaps more for a cumulative fatigue/pump effect.

Same for the pull and legs. This would give you more rest between similar lifts. You could even make a second rotation of primary and secondary lifts and rotate between the two.

Another idea would be to add in a second leg day (assuming you aren’t participating in any sports and can recover well enough). This would insert more rest between days that target the upper body and provide more stimulation for the lower body. You could also apply this to the first suggestion.

I don’t know if this would help because, as I say, I already like your routine. But I thought I’d toss it out there.

[quote]Mondy wrote:
I never train to failure, always keeping a rep or two in the tank.[/quote]

Then I revoke my statement on Cortisol…