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Combat Sport Book Reviews


Please add feedback anyone else that has recently checked out some book titles involving combat sports…

Fit to Fight by Jason Ferruggia

Excellent book. While perhaps the quality of the book itself (pages, # of pictures, etc) could have been better the information is TOP NOTCH. Most books have an explanation for an exercise choice but Jason really imparted an understanding of the purpose and how to prioritize. The book is a lot smaller than I anticipated but he packs so much information in it I had to go over it 3-4 times to pick up on everything.

I loved the supplement section, he really cuts through a lot of bullshit and breaks down what he has seen work.

He pays close attention to getting brutally strong in a few exercises and makes sure that you understand (a theme he repeats) that this training is supplementary to your skill training.

Honestly, I can’t reccomend this title enough. I could go on but I probably wouldn’t do it justice. I think a lot of the ideas Chad Waterbury tries to get across in his articles are in the book. It’s hard for chad because he has such limited space to work with in his articles but the book touches on everything.

Training For Warriors by Martin Rooney

High quality book, a ton of great pictures, excellent motivational section. At first glance the book might seem divided into body part training but the purpose behind this is so that you have a variety of exercises with which to attack your weaknesses. But it is divided into bodyparts, which at first was a bit of a turn off to me. That said, the warm up (which Parisi is known for) is excellent, his mobility section is very detailed, likewise his nutrition section is awesome. I wish he would have went into his conditioning a little more, but i suppose there’s really not that much to say… just get in there and bust ass. Strong believer in proprioreception and touches on this quite a few times.

Building the Ultimate MMA Athlete by Diesel Crew

Diesel Crew is known for innovation and they definitely continued that legacy with this book. They go through mobility drills and anatomy, nutrition, supplement reccomendations…things all the other books touch on as well…

The book is divided into sections specific to MMA ‘styles’, clinch, stand up striking, ground n pound, submissions, etc… it then details exercises that you will probably never see anywhere else on how to improve your physical attributes for each of those aspects of MMA.

Could have touched some more on conditioning, but again, probably not that much to say.

Repeated themes I picked up from all the titles:

Before you even begin to add in any lifting to your MMA program take time to correct imbalances, improve flexibility and mobility.

Low body fat is the best thing you can do for your relative strength, health, and overall game. Nutrition is a very large ‘make or break’.

As Rooney said, “Whats more important to you, eating like crap or MMA?”

anaerobic endurance, consisting of interval training, bodyweight conditioning and complexes

jumping rope is fan-fucking-tastic

supplements are crap if you don’t have everything else dialed in, but if you do, they can be a huge benefit to you.

If Skill training is President, then conditioning is the Secret Service… It keeps you in the game.

Training should be to protect yourself from injury as well as to help you injure your opponent.

Train your neck and your grip

Other than a few indicator exercises (pullups being a huge one all 3 books home in on) strongman training contains the best overall bang for your buck exercises for MMA.

Don’t skip out on isometric training

Overhead squat is a great test of overall athletic ability (strength, flexibility, mobility, stability, grip, core, proprioreception, etc).

Who I’ll try to Review when I get some more time (two of my favorite combat sport S&C coaches)

  • Ross Enamit
  • Zach Even-Esh

All good stuff, I was just about to get fit to fight but wasn’t sure if it would be different from his e-book tap out conditioning which was pretty good didn’t touch much on conditioning either but had good interviews with other coaches. It also has two sample programs that you can do with out a gym .I’ll have to pick up a copy this weekend. Martin Rooney is a great coach and training for warriors is a good read but I have to be honest I thought it would be a little better.

Don’t get me wrong it’s a good book and is great for mobility and strength work but after seeing training for warriors the dvd and hearing Martin speak I expected it to blow away all other books and it just didn’t. The dvd is an absolute must have and I highly recommend it as well as the book. Martin will have many more products coming out which I won’t hesitate to get.

The diesel crew MMA book is great and does have a lot different exercises it�??s one of those books that you can keep going back to and learn from but it is pretty pricey. I have Ross�??s infinite intensity and full throttle conditioning books and they are both a lot of value for the money which is cheap. Ross gives great explanations of the different energy systems etc. and covers a lot of the conditioning aspect. Not much on nutrition, but does give a bunch of sample conditioning protocols, and talks about the Russian conjugate system.

Manly a lot of stuff that you can do on your own in a basement gym without much equipment. Infinite intensity also has a few good heavy bag protocols that I like. These workouts will no doubt get you in sick shape but it is a bit boring doing 100 burpees, push ups, mt climbers etc. Not to mention the extra mileage your putting on your joints. I am an S&C coach and I have a hard time getting clients to be motivated to do anything over 30 let alone 100 it gets stale fast so some of the stuff just is not practical.

I also have and recommend twisted conditioning 2 and MMA conditioning by Bud Jefferies it�??s a whole different read than most of the stuff I have read. Like the diesel crew he covers a lot of different exercises which you�??ll probably never use but some of the stuff is cool. His whole thing is blending maximum strength with endurance work he gives out a bunch of different programs that show you how to develop both qualities at the same time. I am not to good at reviews, either I like it or I don�??t and I defiantly like all these books.

After seeing Fighting Irish’s suggestion to get ‘Fit to Fight’ I purchased it (see I do respect you guyses opinions) and I have to say, I’m impressed. It is one of the better weightlifting/workout books I have purchased, and one of the few on a short list that have been eye-openers. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

twisted conditioning 2 and MMA conditioning by Bud Jefferies, will check them out thanks for the heads up.

I understand the gripe with Ross’s stuff, but i figure if you did enough research to run into his work then you probably have the motivation to get through a workout like that boring or not.

TLDNR

Xen,
Good reviews. You make some good points for Rooney’s book. I kind of brushed it off at first b/c all it looked like was a book with a bunch of pics showing how to do different exercises.

But, once you take the time to really read through the first couple of chapters, you get a better understanding of why it was done this way.

I get the feeling that Rooney isn’t going to hold your hand through an exercise program, rather he’s giving you the tools to construct one yourself. Identify your weak points, then pick out exercises from the book that will help you improve those areas, and go from there.

And yeah, there’s heavy emphasis on warm-up and flexibility. I’ve always been somewhat lax when it comes to a warm-up. I’m thinking of trying a more in-depth warm-up just to see how it affects my workouts.

Joe Lauzon approves of that book

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
Joe Lauzon approves of that book[/quote]
HA, J-Lau. Good find Xen.

FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

[quote]Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.[/quote]

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.

[quote]Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.[/quote]

Yeah, the downside is still part of it, right Mr. Tesla?

[quote]Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.

Yeah, the downside is still part of it, right Mr. Tesla?[/quote]

But not the focus…as your recent post are doing,buddy.

[quote]Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.

Yeah, the downside is still part of it, right Mr. Tesla?

But not the focus…as your recent post are doing,buddy.[/quote]

Sorry dude, but I don’t see a forum for actual martial arts, only one for a shitty abomination of them. So I’ll spread the word a little bit about the real thing here.

[quote]Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.

Yeah, the downside is still part of it, right Mr. Tesla?

But not the focus…as your recent post are doing,buddy.

Sorry dude, but I don’t see a forum for actual martial arts, only one for a shitty abomination of them. So I’ll spread the word a little bit about the real thing here. [/quote]

I knew I’d get ya to show your true colors…stop hijacking.

[quote]Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
Big_Boss wrote:
Bujutsuka wrote:
FIGHTERS FACT BOOK 1 and 2 by Loren W. Christensen.

These books have an amazing variety of good info on actual fighting, including the downfalls of focusing on sport fighting.

Which happens to be the focus of this forum,genius.

Yeah, the downside is still part of it, right Mr. Tesla?

But not the focus…as your recent post are doing,buddy.

Sorry dude, but I don’t see a forum for actual martial arts, only one for a shitty abomination of them. So I’ll spread the word a little bit about the real thing here. [/quote]

Does T-Nation have an ignore function for idiots like this?

I’ll have to disagree about the Ferrugia book which I -obviously in a minority of one-thought was very disappointing having just bought it.

Overall I thought it was largely descriptive of a number of exercises-traditional weights/anaerobic endurance/strongman that most here will know about and limited on how and where to integrate the workouts in the context of mma training.

In anaerobic endurance methods he mentions for example hill sprints as being “an incredibly effective exercise” without any advice about how many reps you may wish to run or how you may like to include them in your overall routine.Advice such as “your rest between sprints should be minimal” seems to me to be both imprecise and wrong.

There are only two and a half pages dedicated to “putting it all together” which is woefully inadequate.He mentions that rotating max effort/DE and strongman is the best way to schedule your training but how, if at all, this changes in the light of a preparation for a fight is not explained.

This is followed by an example of 3 day routines over 4 “phases”. I can see no reference to the phases in the text and have no idea how long each phase is meant to be or to what they refer.

Close to the end of the book there is a brief outline of how to set up training for the “off season” - if such exists in MMA -but with little depth of explanation.

If the world of strength and conditioning is not known to you this book provides an adequate overview of useful methods but for anyone else it really doesn’t give anywhere near sufficient information of either how to train using those specific methods or how they may be utilised in an overall training plan.

No ignore function but i wish they’d mod this douche a lil better

Peter, great points. i personally focused on the lifting, but as i mentioned conditioning was almost not mentioned.

as ive noticed with a lot of mma training books.

Xen,

I think that you have previously made the point yourself but how much additional training can you absorb when you might be on the mat and in the ring up to twice a day AND how do you moderate that when preparing for a fight?

Looking at the positives does anyone here utilise the rotation of max effort/speed/strongman?

It was not made clear whether this is rotated once or twice through the week or less.

I cannot recall whether the speed days are plyometric/ Olympic lifting in nature or the Westside version of speed days or both.

If anyone has any experience of this rotation it would be interesting.

Does anyone have any idea what the phases in the book are about?

[quote]peterm533 wrote:
I’ll have to disagree about the Ferrugia book which I -obviously in a minority of one-thought was very disappointing having just bought it.

Overall I thought it was largely descriptive of a number of exercises-traditional weights/anaerobic endurance/strongman that most here will know about and limited on how and where to integrate the workouts in the context of mma training.

In anaerobic endurance methods he mentions for example hill sprints as being “an incredibly effective exercise” without any advice about how many reps you may wish to run or how you may like to include them in your overall routine.Advice such as “your rest between sprints should be minimal” seems to me to be both imprecise and wrong.

There are only two and a half pages dedicated to “putting it all together” which is woefully inadequate.He mentions that rotating max effort/DE and strongman is the best way to schedule your training but how, if at all, this changes in the light of a preparation for a fight is not explained.

This is followed by an example of 3 day routines over 4 “phases”. I can see no reference to the phases in the text and have no idea how long each phase is meant to be or to what they refer.

Close to the end of the book there is a brief outline of how to set up training for the “off season” - if such exists in MMA -but with little depth of explanation.

If the world of strength and conditioning is not known to you this book provides an adequate overview of useful methods but for anyone else it really doesn’t give anywhere near sufficient information of either how to train using those specific methods or how they may be utilised in an overall training plan.

[/quote]

This criticism is fair enough, and I guess I should qualify what I like about the book since all I said was that I like it.

While it is true that most of the information it contains can be gleaned from articles most of us have read here on T-Nation, the way Jason collected and put it together into the book is refreshing as it presents a resource that one can go to and read up on a topic. There were a few things I wasn’t familiar with, but by and large, I felt his greatest success was in organizing the information in a fairly accessible manner.

Also, the way he presented his theory in regards to workout design, combined with the exercises he has described, give the reader a good blueprint from which to start…perhaps its not a detailed road map per se, but it does give you a good starting point.

Also, one unfair part of your criticism is that it addresses specific workout design when Jason stated a couple times in the book that the optimal exercise routine varies from person to person. I think that is why he did not go into specific detail on this.