T Nation

College Programs

Any one have opinions on the Strength training programs/staff at the following schools: Stanford, USC, Notre Dame, and Ohio State.

I feel all are great programs and would love a few opinions (more educated than my humble opinion) if they exist.

What is your opinion based on? What type of programs do they use?

Just curious?

does anyone know where you could go to find there programs or if you could email these coaches and would they send them to you??

I think that they are not allowed, by the NCAA, to show their programs. If I remember right, USC uses a gayle hatch program (As does LSU). Lots of Oly’s.

Im pretty sure they are allowed to. Coach Kenn will let anyone know what he is doing and a couple of years ago I was given a folder from Coach Gentry of Va. Tech. The problem with some strength coaches is that they think that what they do is something special so they try to keep it a secret when the fact is that wins and losses are never determined by a strength program when you reach higher levels. Remember natural talent will make any coach look good. But there are a lot of great ones out there that are more than glad to talk to you.

USC, LSU, and a couple of other southern schools use the Gayle Hatch system, which is pretty close to an olympic lifting program, next to nothing is done lying down. Miami’s program is influenced by his work, but I think they went with their own thing. I’ve been told by a former player that Notre Dame does the Big 3, your standard progressive overload stuff from sets of 10 down to 5, 3, 1.

No they won’t email you workouts - if you’re in a position to talk shop with a coach and you bring some of your own team’s workouts, an open-minded coach normally will give you a look at some of their stuff, that’s how I got a lot of info. Or you can just get lucky and run into athletes from other schools and ask them for a copy of their summer workouts, which has also given me a lot of ideas. Mike Gentry’s book has a ton of workouts in the back, and the advanced program looks very similar to what the Tech FB team does, some minor differences but still excellent.

I’m not sure what OSU does but, if I was a strength coach for a major college in columbus ohio I would make sure to consult louie simmons. I’m not sure if they do, but I would.

Most college coaches have egos that are too big. Just look at Penn State. They have had the great Dr. Zatsiorsky there and still use a H.I.T. program, but I guess that is why they are so successful, oh wait a minute, uhh nevermind. Talent baby.

I go to USC and am good friends with pretty much everyone on the team. What do you want to know?

http://www.teamandras.com/USC/

http://www.teamandras.com/USC/weightroom/players.htm

I’m trying to become a student athletic trainer. Figure I can make some connections so when I am become the next CW/CT I can train a few big football players :stuck_out_tongue:

Stanford, USC, Notre Dame, and Ohio State

All use standard progresive overload…and like most said incorperate the olympic lifts…notre dame lives and dies by typical progressive overload…these strength programs are not anything special…the football program are exceptional and were talking about the top 1% gentically gifted athletes in the world…so it dosent take much to make these guys bigger, faster, stronger than the average person…not to be a ass but the strength coaches at these schools are very close minded when it comes to anything outside the progressive overload or hit training protocals…rb

BTW we should give a heads up to Joe Kenn and his staff at ASU. His tier system is great

thanks big martin, Im glad to see that someone else understands. It was like when Nebraska had their dominance in the 90’s, you had every high school football coach running to implement their methods and come to find out it sucked.

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
I go to USC and am good friends with pretty much everyone on the team. What do you want to know?

http://www.teamandras.com/USC/

http://www.teamandras.com/USC/weightroom/players.htm

I’m trying to become a student athletic trainer. Figure I can make some connections so when I am become the next CW/CT I can train a few big football players :-P[/quote]

Off topic, but Pete Carroll came into my store today. He’s a pretty big dude.

[quote]S&C Coach wrote:
Any one have opinions on the Strength training programs/staff at the following schools: Stanford, USC, Notre Dame, and Ohio State.

I feel all are great programs and would love a few opinions (more educated than my humble opinion) if they exist. [/quote]

It’s not on your list, but Boyd Epley has a book out on his training programs, called ‘The Path to Athletic Power: The Model Conditioning Program for Championship Performance’[1].

For those not familiar with Boyd Epley, he is a founder of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the guy behind the University of Nebraska?s famed Husker Power program. He’s also been referenced on T-Nation a couple of times.

I’ve got a copy, and it’s a pretty decent book, with a lot of good information.

Another good one is Coach Joe Kenn’s book, ‘The Coach’s Strength Training Playbook’[2]. This book introduces the Tier System of training, which revolves around whole-body workouts of particular design.

If you read Christian Thibaudeau’s ‘Pendulum Training for Athletes’[3], you can get a feel for Coach Kenn’s ideas, as Thibaudeau mentioned that he switched to three days of full body workouts based on some of the ideas in Kenn’s work, though he modified to be even more effective.

If you’re not familiar with him, Joe Kenn is the strength coach at Arizona State.

Lastly, although this one is a little bit different than the other two, ‘Renegade Training for Football: The Ultimate Guide to Developing Maximum Strength, Maximum Speed and Maximum Power’[4] by Coach John Davies (if you’ve been reading T-Mag for a while, he’ll need no introduction). This one is more along the lines of an ‘idea book’, or a book of options for designing your own program, as opposed to the more guided style of the first two books. Some very interesting ideas in it, though.

[1] http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0736047018/qid=1096870745/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8198857-0831313?v=glance&s=books
[2] http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1585188697/qid=1096870799/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_2_1/102-8198857-0831313
[3] http://t-nation.com/findArticle.do;jsessionid=6743938E1BCFBD845780FAD0400A6E9D.ba13-1?article=04-013-training
[4] http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0938045423/ref=pd_sim_books_3/102-8198857-0831313?v=glance&s=books

LSU In-season Monday workout

Power Clean
Squat
Bench
GHR
Leg Curl
Neck
Abs

http://www.teamandras.com/USC/weightroom/weightroom.htm

Yea Pete Carroll is huge, like 6’3, and still decently built. He actually will run through plays with the players and throw passes and stuff… very active guy, still agile.

Nice as hell too…

[quote]barbender242 wrote:
thanks big martin, Im glad to see that someone else understands. It was like when Nebraska had their dominance in the 90’s, you had every high school football coach running to implement their methods and come to find out it sucked. [/quote]

Erm. . . find out that it sucked?

There’s a huge number of college football teams that are using programs very similar to Nebraska’s now, in large part because it rather doesn’t suck. :wink:

I’m pretty familiar with the Nebraska strength training program, and I can assure you, it’s a solid program (or, at least, it was a few years ago, when I last investigated it).

It’s not exactly revolutionary (anymore), but I think it would hold up against any other.

Correct me if I am wrong, but didn’t it have a shitload of presses and little back work? Sounds like a shoulder injury just waiting to happen…

I grew up in Lincoln, Ne and spent quite a bit of time in and around their weight training facilities including the famous South Stadium Strength Complex, which has been renovated many times since I was there. Its a solid program-more aimed at athletic performance than pure strength per-se.

Keith W.