T Nation

College or No College

Do you most of you recommend going to college/university? I know some people that don’t cause they say universities don’t give you real world experiences. So, what is the purpose of a university education? Except that you get a diploma and education of course.

Also, I am planning to take a Calculus course and I want to know what is calculus good for, and why the heck do I need to study it if I am not going to use it for programming?

Thanks!
GB

bro…

Calculus is basically used ALL the time wether you realize it or not!

You said something about programming, and depending on which sort of programming you’re talking about, it could be very deeply rooted in calculus!

I know that all of the programming the AeroStallion has done is in a program called MatLab, it’s very dependent on calculus and applying it in the real world (it’s engineering, engineers use lots of calculus).

Pay attention to it now, or pay for it later!

trust me on that one…

[quote]getbig wrote:
Do you most of you recommend going to college/university? I know some people that don’t cause they say universities don’t give you real world experiences. So, what is the purpose of a university education? Except that you get a diploma and education of course.

Also, I am planning to take a Calculus course and I want to know what is calculus good for, and why the heck do I need to study it if I am not going to use it for programming?

Thanks!
GB[/quote]

Uh, what kind of work do you want to go in? College does a lot more than give you a diploma. In a lot of fields, you’re not gonna get a very good job without a college education. There are exceptions such as trades. But many of these still require further education and learning even if it’s not college.

For physics. If you’re going to do Computer Sci (which I gather from the programming part), then you’ll have to take physics (and more calc).

Go to college. It is the best investment you will ever make in yourself. The economy is going technical. A college degree is equivelant to what a High School Degree was 20 yrs. ago.

What is Calculus good for? A lot of things? It’s used in the chemical, oil and agro business for many basic production functions. You may not need to know how to develop the formula’s but it will not hurt you to know how they work. But to be honest, as an employer…it show’s me you can think and tackle complex problems. Good qualities in a prospective employee.

Calculus provides a way to quantify change.
The universe and everything in it is in a constant state of change.
That you dont know why calculus is important, what it is used for, and why it was developed, is requirement enough of why you need to go to university.
Run to your registrar!

If you are going to work, i.e. study hard, you should definitely go to college. That’s unequivocal.

If you won’t work hard in college, maybe you should not go. It might be a waste of time. You can also postpone your decision if your are unsure.

As to calculus, it would still be worth your while to take it even if later in life you were never to do anything more mathematical than use a calulator to figure out tips in a restaraunt. It teaches you how to think analytically and rigorously, and this carries over to other fields of thought. Think of it as excellent GPP for the brain.

Remember when people said high school is the best time of your life- they are wrong- college is…

Forget the fact that to even play the game you have to have a degree- College can be one of the best experiences of your life… Supple young coeds, no pressure, meeting new people, making life long friends and future business contacts… Also don’t underestimate the importance of taking time to get to know yourself and you likes/dislikes before you jump into a career… Resources are a plenty, and I think that college is a rite of passage that you should not miss out on.

[quote]getbig wrote:
Do you most of you recommend going to college/university? I know some people that don’t cause they say universities don’t give you real world experiences. So, what is the purpose of a university education? Except that you get a diploma and education of course.

Also, I am planning to take a Calculus course and I want to know what is calculus good for, and why the heck do I need to study it if I am not going to use it for programming?

Thanks!
GB[/quote]

If you have an idea what line of work you want to do, start looking online for jobs and see what experience employers are looking for in potential employees. Many companies require a lot more than just a degree, usually they want to see if you have any “real world” experience as well. This can give you a heads up when looking for internships or even potential jobs, while still in school.

im in college for the chicks and the connections.

Thats about it…but you might as well learn all you can while you’re there.

  1. College is easy, even easier than high school, you choose your own schedule, your own classes, and you dont have to go when you don’t feel like it, and you still learn more than you did in public schools

  2. Getting a real job without a college degree is tough. Your choices are limited. I work in computers and I have friends who do, and I can tell you the ones who didn’t go to college wish they had

  3. Where are you going to get this real world experience. Either way without experience (degree or no degree) most places won’t take you very seriuosly. You’re better off going to college and working part time in the field you are studying, when you graduate this paired with your college degree will look good.

  4. I have to say this again, college is nothing like high school, it’s easy as shit

The only thing that matters to most companies is that piece of paper saying you are able to learn. Any company will train you the way they want. Other than that college is a time you will never forget. It is your last chance to have a ton of fun without a lot of responsibilty. I say go to college if you can and enjoy it.

My girlfriend graduates college this week. The job she just applied for pays $40,000/year to start for college grads. They’d hire her if she only had a high school diploma but she only get $30,000 to start.

Well, first you have to specifiy the type of college. Just like gyms, some are worthless and some have everything you need.

It’s pretty much true you don’t get real world experience in college, but that’s what internships are for - and I doubt anyone will train you in “real-world experience” unless you have a degree.

You will need to know stuff. Knowing stuff comes from going to college, studying, and reading. True some courses are redundant or wasteful - it sure isn’t perfect, but you will learn a lot if you put in the work.

How about this - go to the library, check out some textbooks in the field you want to go in. If you think you can learn everything in the book without assistance, and the next ones after it - then you don’t need to go to college.

As far as calculus, it depends on what you’re doing. See above - if the later textbooks contain calculus it’ll tell you why.

Maybe McDonalds hires programmers for their cash registers without a college degree, but I can’t think of too many programming positions I’ve seen that don’t require one.

Besides that, I can honestly say that college helped me become a good programmer. And it was fun. I wouldn’t say it was easy as shit… or that it was nearly as easy as high school. I did math and CS, and I can say it was god-damned hard, but very rewarding.

Are you serious? 4 years of training, sleeping in, parties, macking on chicks, recreational drug experimentation, and some brain-expanding study thrown in now and again…why wouldn’t you want to go?

Nowadays, if you want a semi-respectable job, you NEED to have a college degree. Of course, how meaningful that degree would be to you (and to potential employers) depend on the program itself and how much effort you put into getting that degree.

You will learn a lot of BS in school that either 1) you will NEVER use 2) you will HARDLY use 3) you THINK you will never or hardly use. That’s fine, even if you never use it in your life, it’s still expanding your mind, stimulating thought process, and feeding your brain knowledge. It demonstrates your capability to learn, not to mention your discipline.

Think of it this way, if you do become a programmer, I guarantee that you will not be programming 100% of the time, some times you will need to defend your style, write a report, do some analysis on your run time, find algorithms to optimize your code (and yeah, you will inevitably use calculus at some point), etc. Even though these might not be programming you still have to do it. It’s kind of like college in a sense, to get college degree you need to go through some seemingly-unrelated classes. To get a job and keep a job, you also need to do some seemingly unrelated tasks that may not be programming per se.

In short, go to college, education/knowledge is the most valuable and worthwhile investment you can ever make. It opens doors for you.

[quote]getbig wrote:
Do you most of you recommend going to college/university? I know some people that don’t cause they say universities don’t give you real world experiences. So, what is the purpose of a university education? Except that you get a diploma and education of course.

Also, I am planning to take a Calculus course and I want to know what is calculus good for, and why the heck do I need to study it if I am not going to use it for programming?

Thanks!
GB[/quote]

the “real world experience” thing is what people say who did not go to college. Kind of like ugly people saying beauty is on the inside.

  1. It does not matter what major you have

  2. College teaches you self discipline.

  3. College gets you ready for the “real job” because you have 5-7 different bossess (Professors) every day who have different demands and don’t care what your schedule is. This prepares you for the world.

  4. It is where I ended up meeting my soul-mate too.

Start at a 2 year, then transfer to a university.

Do it.

This would depend on what type of labor market you are in. I never went to college, but landed an excellent job with excellent pay right out of high school simply because there were way more jobs than people.

Once I moved to a tighter labor market, my experience and real world connections trumped all the university degrees I competed against for work.

Experience is worth more than an education, but if you can’t get the experience without an education or you are not willing to move somewhere where you can then it really doesn’t mater.

[quote]getbig wrote:
I know some people that don’t cause they say universities don’t give you real world experiences. So, what is the purpose of a university education? Except that you get a diploma and education of course.[/quote]

Ask someone who didn’t go to college if they wish they had. They may say yes, they may say no. But you won’t find anyone who went and finished and wished they hadn’t.