T Nation

College Level Wrestling.

So I wrestled in highschool for my first two years…now I’m at a community college to transfer to a university but I really want to wrestle. How hard is it to walk on to a division I college wrestling team? The university that my community college is on only offers a wrestling club…its not sponsored by ncaa. I want to wrestle ncaa…any idea on how I should go about this guys?

all things are possible, just some are very improbable.

#1, how well did you do in high school. No offense i’m assuming not that well since you only wrestled two years. but lets say you had some extenuating circumstances and you’re a natural.

#2, you’re very far removed from the sport now and you need to get back into condition and to develop the kinesthetic sense needed for wrestling…not to mention the mindset.

#3, if this is a Div I team good luck. If you’re good enough they’ll let you be cannon fodder for a season, and then you only have one more yr of school left. You’re going to have to sacrifice A LOT to get good enough to make anything of yourself on the team…and unlike most of them… you won’t have a scholarship… also what do you intend on doing after wrestling? You’ll have one year of ass kickings then MAYBE one year of wrestling and then you’re… what?..done? … mma? The time you could have spent lifting and fucking broads you spent rolling around with a bunch of other dudes in tights? Seriously think about it…

Finally, if you still want to wrestle. usawrestling.com find a club team immediately and start training ASAP. And start doing a shitload of weighted pullups, power cleans, full squats, deadlifts, and overhead presses.

I never actually wrestled, because I came from the sticks and the “wrastlin” we did wasn’t co-curricular, if you get my drift. Now that I live in Iowa though, everyone wrestled. I think I can safely say if you wanted to walk on to Iowa State or even Iowa, it would be incredibly hard. Minnesota and Okie State too for that matter. Other places? I don’t know, hopefully someone else will have better feedback for you.

Good luck, all the same.

Let me preface this by saying I’m being a little negative here, but I encourage anyone to try for what they want…you won’t know if you can do it until you try.

It is hard. The first step to wrestling D-1 would probably be joining a uni that has a D- wrestling program, the second step would be trying out for the team.

A word of warning - most of us [former high school wrestlers] are not going to be good enough to start or even get a chance to compete in an actual collegiate match, ever.

Many teams love to have extra bodies to train with, but you’re basically a wrestling version of ‘scout O’ for the guys who actually get to compete. I ‘walked on’ to this role at a D-3 school and there were 3 guys ahead of me in my weight class alone, who used to just abuse me. The top two guys were amazing athletes, and the other one was just technically sound after a couple of years on the team.

Even state champs are relegated to this at many schools which is pretty hard on the psyche of someone who was once a dominate wrestler in their respective region.

University of Northern Colorado has recently joined D-1 (wrestling) and has traditionally been a decent wrestling school, though the place stinks due to the slaughterhouse in the area.

I wrestled on Long Island, which is some of the best wrestling in the country. I was the number one ranked wrestler at 275 lbs going into my senior year.

My point is, that I never got ultra serious and persued a scholarship (football I had a couple) and truthfully no one really came my way to offer me one. So it was hard for me to get to that level and I was considered good. If you aren’t superb D1 isnt the answer.

You could wrestle division two/three and still face great competition, and NCAA wrestlers. If you are good enough, and you do well there you end up in the same boat as the D1 guys in terms of Olypmic opportunities.

Plus if you’ve only been at CC for 2 years, you’ll have three years at your school and you would have a good chance of earning a weight class spot.

Xen and SlimJim have good advice (as usual) even if it’s not what you want to hear.

This is alot of good info and advice. First, let me answer some of the questions…the reason I stopped after 2 years was due to the county building a new highschool around the corner, so when I switched schools I just did not want to wrestle there…but while I wrestled our team was 19-0 and we went to states.

I am far removed except for doing some bjj which is pretty different (although my wrestling skills seem to help alot). I do feel as though I have natural talent as far as skills, in fact I feel as though if I was just freakishly strong I could be on a D1 team now. I don’t think I can match most of the guys strength at my weight or even if I dropped weight…I should just forget about this lol.

Xen Nova really hit it on the head.
His three points sum it up very well.

I will be direct as well- You might be better off at the club,
or intramural level. Or do some BJJ. Its probably more fun too.

I did D3 then D1 1 and its more competitive then you can imagine. Did you win a tournament in HS?

can you run 10 miles?

did you have 100 carreer wins or in your case 40 to 50?

Did you win or place in your sectionals
who was your coach?

that is what they are looking for.
Cutting weight will be a given.

I went to a small d3 school that had a great coach and a tough room,this is after 4 years of HS wrestling 6 of judo
2 wrestling camps, numerous clinics.

I did not start at first. Only as I improved and injuries happened did I start.
everyday I worked with the returning national champ d3 130 lb the NJ state 2nd place at 126, the 1st and 2nd at 105 in NY state and some sectional place holders.

Eventually I cut from 130 to 118 to start,but did not win the wrestle off consistently.
My 2nd year- I did more clinics and post season tournaments- and eventually I started at 130.

My D3 coach was an NCAA champ an all american,
and a world Greco- competitor only through much work on Greco and a decent showing at the empire state games.did I finally get
an offer to a D1 school and not be red-shirted.

All of this to be an average but dedicated D1 wrestler. I had no clue to how hard this would be to start.

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
Xen Nova really hit it on the head.
His three points sum it up very well.

I will be direct as well- You might be better off at the club,
or intramural level. Or do some BJJ. Its probably more fun too.

I did D3 then D1 1 and its more competitive then you can imagine. Did you win a tournament in HS?

can you run 10 miles?

did you have 100 carreer wins or in your case 40 to 50?

Did you win or place in your sectionals
who was your coach?

that is what they are looking for.
Cutting weight will be a given.

I went to a small d3 school that had a great coach and a tough room,this is after 4 years of HS wrestling 6 of judo
2 wrestling camps, numerous clinics.

I did not start at first. Only as I improved and injuries happened did I start.
everyday I worked with the returning national champ d3 130 lb the NJ state 2nd place at 126, the 1st and 2nd at 105 in NY state and some sectional place holders.

Eventually I cut from 130 to 118 to start,but did not win the wrestle off consistently.
My 2nd year- I did more clinics and post season tournaments- and eventually I started at 130.

My D3 coach was an NCAA champ an all american,
and a world Greco- competitor only through much work on Greco and a decent showing at the empire state games.did I finally get
an offer to a D1 school and not be red-shirted.

I wrestled 1 more year at Syracuse- 30 or so starts and a tournament or two. Injuries eventually put it to a stop
All of this to be an average but dedicated D1 wrestler. I had no clue to how hard this would be to start.

kmc

[/quote]

Wow man…this really opens my eyes to how good you have to be to be a D1 star or even better on the olympic team. I probably will just do BJJ…but it is expensive.

Glad you took it that way,
I did not want to sound like a jerk-
but really a good program is that hard.

I was ok- certainly not a star.
not by any stretch.
I did go to the OTC in Colorado-
once for a clinic- and once to train for a big tournament.

I had to work a little harder on lots of things
than most of my team mates they were better then me. I would say the stable mates I had
were always my stiffest competition.

Find a nice club team- or a good BJJ school
you can have the fun , and not the pressure.

kmc

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
Glad you took it that way,
I did not want to sound like a jerk-
but really a good program is that hard.

I was ok- certainly not a star.
not by any stretch.
I did go to the OTC in Colorado-
once for a clinic- and once to train for a big tournament.

I had to work a little harder on lots of things
than most of my team mates they were better then me. I would say the stable mates I had
were always my stiffest competition.

Find a nice club team- or a good BJJ school
you can have the fun , and not the pressure.

kmc

[/quote]

True…FAU has a club team that competes in ncwa…against alot of other schools i didn’t even know were on ncwa…fsu…ucf…georgia tech…on and on. Definately seems like its pretty competitive…so Im going to do that.

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
Glad you took it that way,
I did not want to sound like a jerk-
but really a good program is that hard.

I was ok- certainly not a star.
not by any stretch.
I did go to the OTC in Colorado-
once for a clinic- and once to train for a big tournament.

I had to work a little harder on lots of things
than most of my team mates they were better then me. I would say the stable mates I had
were always my stiffest competition.

Find a nice club team- or a good BJJ school
you can have the fun , and not the pressure.

kmc

[/quote]

I’ve often wondered how guys stuck with it(wrestling) for so long. I only spent a year in college (the first time) before I joined the army, and it was the most difficult (physically) experience of my life.

I was easily the most athletic guy on our highschool team my junior and senior year, I went to J. Rob’s camps every summer, won regionals and won more than I lost at the state tourneys my junior and senior year, and I thought I was humble.

However, I was more humble after I showed up to my first day of practice and our heavyweight could sprint up a hill as fast as I could, and every guy on the mat was a beast…I’d never seen jacked guys walking around at 170 lbs that didn’t ever get tired.

[quote]slimjim wrote:
kmcnyc wrote:
Glad you took it that way,
I did not want to sound like a jerk-
but really a good program is that hard.

I was ok- certainly not a star.
not by any stretch.
I did go to the OTC in Colorado-
once for a clinic- and once to train for a big tournament.

I had to work a little harder on lots of things
than most of my team mates they were better then me. I would say the stable mates I had
were always my stiffest competition.

Find a nice club team- or a good BJJ school
you can have the fun , and not the pressure.

kmc

I’ve often wondered how guys stuck with it(wrestling) for so long. I only spent a year in college (the first time) before I joined the army, and it was the most difficult (physically) experience of my life.

I was easily the most athletic guy on our highschool team my junior and senior year, I went to J. Rob’s camps every summer, won regionals and won more than I lost at the state tourneys my junior and senior year, and I thought I was humble.

However, I was more humble after I showed up to my first day of practice and our heavyweight could sprint up a hill as fast as I could, and every guy on the mat was a beast…I’d never seen jacked guys walking around at 170 lbs that didn’t ever get tired.[/quote]

Dude
You are so not kidding.
I was a little guy, and the 167 and 185 were faster then I was-
in hills or distance.

there was huge turn over at each season of people who did not make it. Or who left.

I will say there were tears after some practices.
I needed it to get through school.
but It was a little more than insane.
I ran the NYC marathon in 1991 and competed in a match
that Tuesday.
Its a grind- the weight cutting, living on a lime for a few days
riding an stationary bike in plastics in the van on the way to a tournament.

I did the two year D3 jr college to D1
and D1 was even more insane.
I had to let it go after the 1st year there.
Its great to hear two coaches discuss your next two years
in pounds and ounces.

In retrospect I would have quit after the first year.
I grew 4 inches post college. go figure.

kmc

[quote]kmcnyc wrote:
slimjim wrote:
kmcnyc wrote:
Glad you took it that way,
I did not want to sound like a jerk-
but really a good program is that hard.

I was ok- certainly not a star.
not by any stretch.
I did go to the OTC in Colorado-
once for a clinic- and once to train for a big tournament.

I had to work a little harder on lots of things
than most of my team mates they were better then me. I would say the stable mates I had
were always my stiffest competition.

Find a nice club team- or a good BJJ school
you can have the fun , and not the pressure.

kmc

I’ve often wondered how guys stuck with it(wrestling) for so long. I only spent a year in college (the first time) before I joined the army, and it was the most difficult (physically) experience of my life.

I was easily the most athletic guy on our highschool team my junior and senior year, I went to J. Rob’s camps every summer, won regionals and won more than I lost at the state tourneys my junior and senior year, and I thought I was humble.

However, I was more humble after I showed up to my first day of practice and our heavyweight could sprint up a hill as fast as I could, and every guy on the mat was a beast…I’d never seen jacked guys walking around at 170 lbs that didn’t ever get tired.

Dude
You are so not kidding.
I was a little guy, and the 167 and 185 were faster then I was-
in hills or distance.

there was huge turn over at each season of people who did not make it. Or who left.

I will say there were tears after some practices.
I needed it to get through school.
but It was a little more than insane.
I ran the NYC marathon in 1991 and competed in a match
that Tuesday.
Its a grind- the weight cutting, living on a lime for a few days
riding an stationary bike in plastics in the van on the way to a tournament.

I did the two year D3 jr college to D1
and D1 was even more insane.
I had to let it go after the 1st year there.
Its great to hear two coaches discuss your next two years
in pounds and ounces.

In retrospect I would have quit after the first year.
I grew 4 inches post college. go figure.

kmc

[/quote]

This is what I’m worried about…I know I’m gonna have to wrestle at 152…

get your conditioning and diet into what they need to be.

Its much more about conditioning then strength

kmc

[quote]facko wrote:
This is what I’m worried about…I know I’m gonna have to wrestle at 152…[/quote]

I’ll try to offer some input and I’ll try not to be harsh about it either. First off, the weight classes are different from high school, no 152. 125, 133, 141, 149, 157, 165, 174, 184, 197, HWT (I think it’s 275, maybe 285, never cared enough to ask haha). Anyways, beyond that, not to dash your hopes, but you probably want to look into other options besides D1. I wrestled D1 at a top 25 school, and literally every single person was at least a one time state champ, unless they were from PA or NJ which are deep enough that just state placers could hang regardless. (That depth also applies to OH and CA and probably a few other places too, but we didn’t have anyone from those states on our team). It was a pretty solid team, but we were generally between 20-25. I’d say that even outside of top 25 programs, around 90% of the kids on rosters were at least state placers unless they were studs from solid states that didn’t catch a break.

Anyways, there are two reasons I mention all that. The first is that if you do try to walk on, you need to know what you’re getting in to. Odds are, if you weren’t a phenom back in high school, in addition to being out of the game for a while, you will get thrown around so badly that it will discourage you and drive you away from the sport completely, which would be a shame. The second reason has to do with the fact that there are a relatively small amount of D1 wrestlers compared to the total number of high school wrestlers. Because of this, a ton of elite talent is concentrated in D1. However, that also means that there is a lot of spillover of very good talent in D2, D3, NAIA, and Juco wrestling. So, if you want to walk onto a D1 squad because you think it’s the only way you could push yourself, you definitely should check out another option. In fact, I can absolutely guarantee you that you can easily find a D2 or D3 kid that will wipe the mat with you. (In fact, two of the best leg riders I’ve ever wrestled were this year’s 157 D1 national champ Jordan Leen (5-3), and a 2-time D2 national champ from UPJ(2-0), which just goes to show that you can find studs anywhere).
At the same time though, you will probably be able to find a few kids that are more around your level. If you only train with people that can kick your ass, it’s going to be hard to get better. If you have a combination of them and people you can actually go with, it will be a lot easier for you to continue with sport and keep on improving, at least mentally.

Basically, what I’m trying to say is that you shouldn’t limit yourself to either D1 wrestling or BJJ, there are options in college wrestling that can fit anybody. Good luck

edit: off-topic, did they reset our levels? I used to be 3 and it says 0 now, not that it matters really

double-edit: never mind it says 3 again