T Nation

CNS Recovery or Just Outdated?

Has anyone ever done a max lift that’s taken them weeks to get over?

I did a yoke walk a couple of weeks ago that I seem to still be feeling the effects from. It was 650 for 50’ and I’d never carried so much before. It’s really taken it’s toll on me.

Anyway, I was wondering if there was anything special you older guys do to recover. (I’m 43) I’m getting tired of just resting and slowly working my way back.

You could give Powerdrive a shot.

I did this with some rack pulls once. On my last one I saw stars, almost passed out and developed a terrible burning headache across the back of my head. For the next 2 weeks anytime I exerted myself just a little, back would come the headache.

Where in Kansas are you? I can lead you to a forum that has a lot of good bros from the KC area (and beyond) that can probably help you more. They have quite a bit of powerlifting and strongman experience. They’ve helped me a ton.

Is it possible to cause structural damage? Yes. I think the key point is to listen to what your body tells you. Force+duration might create compression in the spine (and neck) that does not recover or simply creates nerve irritation. Inflammation can be self perpetuating as muscles tighten up and then sustain compression and irritation. If that is the case, stretching and massage can be useful. Anti-inflammatories can be used, including EFA’s. The healing processes of damaged tissue involve inflammation and swelling that can irritate nearby nerves. Antioxidants may also be useful in limiting the damage from the inflammation.

I don’t think the CNS needs to recover, something may have or continues to irritate nerves. The CNS was not stressed from its actions, but is the passive victim of damage.

If it hurts, don’t do it (again). Welcome to getting older :wink:

[quote]roofus_5 wrote:
I did this with some rack pulls once. On my last one I saw stars, almost passed out and developed a terrible burning headache across the back of my head. For the next 2 weeks anytime I exerted myself just a little, back would come the headache.

Where in Kansas are you? I can lead you to a forum that has a lot of good bros from the KC area (and beyond) that can probably help you more. They have quite a bit of powerlifting and strongman experience. They’ve helped me a ton.[/quote]

Thanks roofus
I thought I was going to hurl when I finished. If I had something in my stomach I’m sure I would have. But I’m not having any reacurring nausia.

I’m just north of Topeka. I think I know what group you’re talking about, and yes they are a great group of guys if it’s Eric and the guys. I was at the last meet when I did the yoke.

[quote]KSman wrote:
Is it possible to cause structural damage? Yes. I think the key point is to listen to what your body tells you. Force+duration might create compression in the spine (and neck) that does not recover or simply creates nerve irritation. Inflammation can be self perpetuating as muscles tighten up and then sustain compression and irritation. If that is the case, stretching and massage can be useful. Anti-inflammatories can be used, including EFA’s. The healing processes of damaged tissue involve inflammation and swelling that can irritate nearby nerves. Antioxidants may also be useful in limiting the damage from the inflammation.

I don’t think the CNS needs to recover, something may have or continues to irritate nerves. The CNS was not stressed from its actions, but is the passive victim of damage.

If it hurts, don’t do it (again). Welcome to getting older ;)[/quote]

Thanks Ksman.

The only structural damage that I think I’ve done is on the achilles tendons. First the left one prior to the meet. Then the right one as well during the meet. But I was told it is normal when doing heavy yokes and to look into heel support from an orthopedic doctor. Which I’ll do after the holidays.

The only other thing is the (erectors?) large muscles on either side of the spine, where tight for a full week. But I can do pretty much what I need to do now. The only thing is, the weight feels twice as heavy with half the weight.

And I want to do it again, only better.