T Nation

CNS Fatigue Recovery

Hi I am a new member but not new to the site and I’ve decided to post since there are many knowledgeable people here.

I made a stupid decision to include some powerlifting to my bodybuilding routine just when my body needed some rest. After 4 weeks of pushing hard and doing singles every week (deadlift, bench, squat) the cns fatigue symptoms started to show. I felt sick occasionally, some fatigue, joint pain but I totally ignored them because I had no idea about cns fatigue.

After nearly 4 other weeks, the symptoms just got worse (felt totally drained, eye burns, very exhausted, difficulty to concentrate, insomnia, typos) so I did my research and knew it was cns fatigue.

I have now accomplished my second week away from gym and I am recovering slowly but just when I felt I will be able to hit back the gym in few days, I had a bad fever.

Im wondering how I will be able to figure out that I have totally recovered? Is it as soon as I feel normal again? Has anyone experienced somehow the same? When to tell I can come back?

Thanx for taking the time to read this long paragraph

Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.

[quote]JFG wrote:
Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.[/quote]

Do you think Dan John’s tap test can also be used to establish a baseline?

Thibaudeau wrote about it last year, and I thought about it when reading this thread.

THIB’S TIP: Workout Regulation

[quote]fncj wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:
Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.[/quote]

Do you think Dan John’s tap test can also be used to establish a baseline?

Thibaudeau wrote about it last year, and I thought about it when reading this thread.

THIB’S TIP: Workout Regulation

Of course. Use the tool that is best for you.

I have been using the morning test for about 20 years now and preach it to anyone that will listen.

[quote]JFG wrote:

[quote]fncj wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:
Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.[/quote]

Do you think Dan John’s tap test can also be used to establish a baseline?

Thibaudeau wrote about it last year, and I thought about it when reading this thread.

THIB’S TIP: Workout Regulation

Of course. Use the tool that is best for you.

I have been using the morning test for about 20 years now and preach it to anyone that will listen.[/quote]

What kind of insight have you gotten from doing that? Stuff like catching oncoming illness before it strikes, or noticing the effects of stress at work? Things like that?

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:

[quote]fncj wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:
Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.[/quote]

Do you think Dan John’s tap test can also be used to establish a baseline?

Thibaudeau wrote about it last year, and I thought about it when reading this thread.

THIB’S TIP: Workout Regulation

Of course. Use the tool that is best for you.

I have been using the morning test for about 20 years now and preach it to anyone that will listen.[/quote]

What kind of insight have you gotten from doing that? Stuff like catching oncoming illness before it strikes, or noticing the effects of stress at work? Things like that?[/quote]

When your heart rate is elevated compared to your norm, there is “something”. Be it a cold, flu, stress, excitement, etc. You get to know if you are “fighting something” or if your body is just kaput and needs the rest. Diet plays a major roll also. But again, you get the finer points the more you use it.

Please understand, this is a tool. Don’t get caught up in the numbers (OMG, my BPM is one point higher… I should sleep another 12 hours…). After a while (depends on you), you take your HB less and less. You get to know the “signs”.

It’s all in the process of “knowing your body”.

having a bad day is just that. A bad day. Ever been to the gym when your mind was not with it? It has nothing to do with CNS fatigue or overtraining, you are just not with it and your mind has defeated you before you started. But again, you know the difference by listening to your body. But to be able to listen to your body, you have to practice “listening”.

Cheers

[quote]JFG wrote:

[quote]fncj wrote:

[quote]JFG wrote:
Every morning, take your heart rate.

After a month, you will know what your baseline is.

When your heart rate rises, there is something.[/quote]

Do you think Dan John’s tap test can also be used to establish a baseline?

Thibaudeau wrote about it last year, and I thought about it when reading this thread.

THIB’S TIP: Workout Regulation

Of course. Use the tool that is best for you.

I have been using the morning test for about 20 years now and preach it to anyone that will listen.[/quote]

I can attest to that.

I’ve used heart rate monitoring in the past, but over the course of three days and used the average. At the start of a program, two weeks in, and then three weeks in. It took a year but I learned to scale back cardio or increase recovery time/methods if my RHR is much higher three weeks in. If there’s no significant change then I stay the course.

Though the tap test seems like a nice alternative, so may try that with an upcoming program. (In addition since I track RHR anyway.)

Thanks.