T Nation

Cloverfield

Has anybody else seen this movie? It is fantastic. Like any other Godzillaish movie you have to make some leaps in faith for the movie to work, but I mean, you should know that beforehand given the type of movie that it is. It is filmed FPS style, a la Blair Witch, but it’s smooth compared to your normal home movies not shot on a tripod so it’s not nauseating.

Just so anyone who is reading this knows, I can’t guarantee that there won’t by any spoilers in the remainder of the thread. Just know that you should drop what you are doing and go watch it right now.

Agree 100%.

Great film.

I haven’t seen it yet. But it better be THE Godzilla, not some cheap knock off, or I’m gonna be pissed.

I saw it today. I will not give away any spoilers, but I feel events that took place in the movie were more realistic than some stupid feel good action flick of the year.

I really felt like I was watching real video and not just some movie someone created.

The plot was great, but see the movie for yourself.

Graphics, what can I say, I was blow away. Everything looked so real. Almost too real at time.

GO SEE IT!

i thought they left some things out, i would say worth seeing in the movie theator but not the best movie ive seen

Just got back from seeing it again. There’s some pretty subtle stuff in there that’s really easy to miss the first time. Do spoiler tags work on this forum?

I just wanna know if it’s fuckin’ Godzilla or not, someone throw me a PM if you’ve seen it.

[quote]Ghost22 wrote:
I just wanna know if it’s fuckin’ Godzilla or not, someone throw me a PM if you’ve seen it. [/quote]

I second that. I’m gonna try to see the movie this weekend, but I wanna know if it’s Godzilla.

I’m just going to go ahead and answer that one in this post so (I will hide the answer in a wall of text so it’s possible to skip this and not accidentally see the answer)

Minor Spoiler Alert
The dynamic effort (DE) method is one of three ways (the other two being the maximal effort and repetition method) to develop muscular force, and as a result, strength. One of the best, and coincidentally one of the least utilized, ways to get stronger is to get faster. By utilizing the dynamic effort method, you’re teaching yourself to explodethrough those sticking points that serve as obstacles in your pursuit of progress.
It is not Godzilla. The dynamic effort method is generally used for the “big three” movements (squat, bench press, and deadlift) using loads of 50 to 70% of your one-repetition maximum (1RM). On any given week, one training session would begin with a DE bench variation, and another would start with a DE squat/deadlift variation.

I saw it today and really enjoyed it. I had no expectations going in. Thumbs up from me.

The reason it was left open is because he plans on doing a few movies around this, he wants to do some from different peoples prespectives and he wants to continue the story. This could be are Godzilla.

I thought it was ok - not great, but it definitely had its moments.

The idea to shoot the movie as a continuous home video was definitely pretty cool - way different from the standard methods where you’re detached from everything. so i guess that’s a plus.

Still don’t think it was worth the price of admission, though.

Explain yourself ghost.

[quote]FlavaDave wrote:
Explain yourself ghost.[/quote]

Haha ok, although i don’t know how much i can say without revealing anything.

Again, the way the movie was shot was definitely pretty cool, but it got kinda old after a while. Also, I was frustrated by the fact that we as viewers don’t have any more information as to what’s going on than the main characters. Stupid as it seems, I don’t like being kept guessing for this type of movie.
Another thing is that it was difficult to associate with the characters; the intro combined with flahsbacks throughout the movie certainly help the viewers get to know the main characters, but there’s not much depth to any of it.
I’m not going to give it away, but the ending was a huge cliffhanger. Kinda ruined it for me after all this buildup.

Rereading my post, I guess I should have expected all of the things I complained about, as the producers/writers clearly wanted to keep the audience in the dark about this one.
I suppose it was pretty good for what it was, then.

Anyone who hasn’t seen it yet and is interested:
watch the background during the very last scene.

[quote]ghost wrote:
FlavaDave wrote:
Explain yourself ghost.

Haha ok, although i don’t know how much i can say without revealing anything.

Again, the way the movie was shot was definitely pretty cool, but it got kinda old after a while. Also, I was frustrated by the fact that we as viewers don’t have any more information as to what’s going on than the main characters. Stupid as it seems, I don’t like being kept guessing for this type of movie.
Another thing is that it was difficult to associate with the characters; the intro combined with flahsbacks throughout the movie certainly help the viewers get to know the main characters, but there’s not much depth to any of it.
I’m not going to give it away, but the ending was a huge cliffhanger. Kinda ruined it for me after all this buildup.

[/quote]

This seems to be the generic response to people who did not like the movie, so people definitely do relate to you. No movie is for everyone, it seems that its worth going to see though so I might go watch it in imax this weekend or so.

Yeah, I didn’t like the ending, but it seems there will be a sequel that makes up for it.

Pretty cool overall.

[quote]ghost wrote:
Anyone who hasn’t seen it yet and is interested:
watch the background during the very last scene.[/quote]

YES!

Definitely do this. Answers 0 questions and really only creates another huge one. I’ll bury this next spoiler in a wall of text similar to the last one, but this time the spoiler will be in italics so it’s easy to find.

Minor Spoiler Alert
Selenium has been shown in various animal models to prevent the toxic effects of methylmercury (Ganther et al., 1972; Iwata et al., 1973) and even increase the inorganic-to-methyl mercury ratio in tissues (Komsta-Szumska & Miller, 1984; Brzeznicka & Chmielnicka, 1985). But unfortunately, selenium has also been shown to increase the methylmercury concentration in the brain, which is just about the worst thing it could do (Magos & Webb, 1977; Brzeznicka & Chmielnicka 1985). At the end when the camera switches back to Beth and that guy’s “good day” at Coney Island, before he turns the camera towards them it’s giving a view of Coney Island. During that scene, look towards the right side of the screen and you’ll see a white ship. Now, look just a little bit left and you will see a tiny black dot fall out of the sky into the ocean and make a splash. Since methylmercury binds and potentially depletes glutathione stores in the liver, it would be a good idea for heavy tuna eaters to supplement with N-acetylcystine (a glutathione precursor) to insure that the liver maintains optimal antioxidant ability. Dr. Ryan Smith recommends 1500mg a day. This is a good recommendation and should be followed by heavy tuna eaters.

Space left so you can scroll past.

If you really want to get obsessive about this movie there’s all kinds of stuff on the 'nets that explains small nuances in the movie that was put out by the marketing department.

SPOILER DISCUSSION
Italics rule followed

Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 �?? February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire (including his classic works “'Round Midnight” and “Blue Monk”). He is often regarded as a founder of bebop, although his playing style evolved away from the form. His compositions and improvisations are full of dissonant harmonies and angular melodic twists, and are impossible to separate from Monk’s unorthodox approach to the piano, which combined a highly percussive attack with abrupt, dramatic use of silences and hesitations. I have a question for those that have seen the movie regarding the timing on the closing shot issue. Timing-wise, how much later was ship capsizing versus the Coney Island trip? I know the explosions during the party occurred sometime after, but I wonder if the item from space was followed soon thereafter by the capsizing. Even if it wasn’t instantaneous it could be assumed there might be a delay between that event and the capsizing. So, it may not be a sequel set-up; rather additional exposition as to how it began. Of course, if it came from space there is certainly room for a sequel anyway. Little is known about Monk’s early life. He was born on October 10, 1917 in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, the son of Thelonious and Barbara Monk, two years after a sister named Marian. A younger brother, Thomas, was born a couple of years later. Monk started playing the piano at the age of nine; although he had some formal training and eavesdropped on his sister’s piano lessons, he was essentially self-taught. In 1922, the family moved to Manhattan, living at 243 West 63rd St. Monk attended Stuyvesant High School, but did not graduate. He briefly toured with an evangelist in his teens, playing the church organ, and in his late teens he began to find work playing jazz. Monk is believed to be the pianist featured on recordings Jerry Newman made around 1941 at Minton’s Playhouse, the legendary Manhattan club where Monk was the house pianist. Monk’s style at the time was described as “hard-swinging,” with the addition of runs in the style of Art Tatum. Monk’s stated influences include Duke Ellington, James P. Johnson, and other early stride pianists. Monk’s unique piano style was largely perfected during his stint as the house pianist at Minton’s in the early-to-mid 1940s, when he participated in the famous after-hours “cutting competitions” that featured most of the leading jazz soloists of the day. The Minton’s scene was crucial in the formulation of the bebop genre and it brought Monk into close contact and collaboration with other leading exponents of bebop including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Christian, Kenny Clarke, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, and Milt Jackson.