T Nation

Cleans, Reverse Grip

Anyone out there do cleans, but w/ a reverse grip? I’ve heard from a former elite athlete that it would hit the biceps area more which is where he needed some extra strenght for throwing. Also, he would perform it this way because of a wrist injury which prevented him from racking the bar with pain.

[quote]BRUCELEEWANNABE wrote:
Anyone out there do cleans, but w/ a reverse grip? I’ve heard from a former elite athlete that it would hit the biceps area more which is where he needed some extra strenght for throwing. Also, he would perform it this way because of a wrist injury which prevented him from racking the bar with pain. [/quote]

there’s a power curl thing that’s essentially a reverse power clean. Details on Dan John’s site.

Not sure what type of throwing you are talking about! I was a succesfull shot putter, discus thrower, and hammer thrower at the division 1 level. The reserve grip clean is not widely exepted in the throwing comunity! The bicep has ABSOLUTY NOTHING TO DO WITH THROWING! NOTHING! The clean and snatch are not used a stregth building or muscle building excercise! As a matter of fact reps are usually kept below the three rep range in order to keep bar speed at it’s max. After three reps, the clean goes from an explosive, powerful lift to a stength building lift. Again, I’m not sure what throwing you are talking about. I’ll P.M you with a link to a good throwers specific forum. There are many successfull high school and college coaches and athletes who post there. There are even a few elite level throwers such as Jason Tunks and Adam Nelson who post there as well.

As far as I know the only world class thrower who ever used the reverse grip clean is Ricky Brushe (pronounced broosh)…not sure how it’s spelled. He was an old school swedish discus thrower. The link I’ll give you will have some one on there who can get you a copy of the Ricky Brushe Story. Good movie to watch.

seriously, if you friend has issues with his wrist, the reverse grip clean may be a waste. He may want to start concetrating on the snatch. It’s a very explosive lift and there is no need for a big catch like the clean. Well…at least the catch is different enough to take a lot of preasure of the wrists. Also, just doing clean pulls can be very effective as well. Two days a week for cleans, and the same for snatches. One fast day (light) and one slow day (heavy). In both instances you need to be efficient in the lifts. Keeping the bar close to your body and in a straight line. Remember that one HUGE thing in the either the clean or snatch is ACCELERATION! You need to accelerate bar as it drives up! You may have heard of a two part pull in the clean. Anyway, check out your p.m box.

Jay

Justthrowit is exacltly right. This may sound harsh but if your are performing OL movements for bodybuilding reasons, please stop! Your technique is probably horrible, shitty might be a better word. Remember the snatch and clean are events in a power sport. They were never, I mean NEVER, intended to build specific muscles. They are intended to efficiently lift heavy overhead in a competitive arena. They can also be used to improve vertical power and force generation. Definitely not improving bicep “appearence.”

Bodybuilders, pleae stick with the preacher curls, cable crossovers, and leg extensions, and don’t forget to “watch” your form in a mirror (we all how technically hard a barbell is LOL). Save to hard lifting (snatch, C & J, squat, bench, and deads) for the OLs and PLs out there and we’ll leave the smith machine open for you.

[quote]Crow wrote:
Justthrowit is exacltly right. This may sound harsh but if your are performing OL movements for bodybuilding reasons, please stop! Your technique is probably horrible, shitty might be a better word. Remember the snatch and clean are events in a power sport. They were never, I mean NEVER, intended to build specific muscles. They are intended to efficiently lift heavy overhead in a competitive arena. They can also be used to improve vertical power and force generation. Definitely not improving bicep “appearence.”

Bodybuilders, pleae stick with the preacher curls, cable crossovers, and leg extensions, and don’t forget to “watch” your form in a mirror (we all how technically hard a barbell is LOL). Save to hard lifting (snatch, C & J, squat, bench, and deads) for the OLs and PLs out there and we’ll leave the smith machine open for you. [/quote]

Thanks for the reply. No I don’t perform those lifts for bodybuilding purposes. I use to do them a a very knowledgeable trainer ( Tim Schuman, anyone know this guy, last I heard he was the S&C coach for a arena football team in Orlando, big huge dude w/ the most excellent form in the OL lifts! )

I no longer perform them cause I don’t have that watchful eye, which sucks because they’re such awesome lifts. I do miss them very much. I do however still do the DB snatch which I have no problmo with! It fun to do too! Working on 85 lbs. but can’t get it. Any suggestions? More triceps??

Thanks again for chirping in!

Triceps? NO! Again, I’m going to say explosive! O.L’s are not strenght excersizes! It’s an acceleration excersize that increases your explosiveness and power! You have to remember that there is a lot of rythm involved in doing O.L! The more you do them better you will get at that rythm and getting your bodyparts to move and work together. I’ll tell you this…my best clean ever (from the floor, no straps) was 385 and my best snatch was 285. This was on my best day. My body was fast that day and everythign was very rythmic! So rythmic that the lift actually felt quite easy! There were days that i struggled to get 315 just because I was out of rythm that day! If you want to get that 85# DB up on a DB snatch, don’t focus on your tricep, your shoulders, legs, back, etc etc…focus on your form. Focus on your rythm and working on accelerating the DB to it’s highest point. Again, not stregth! Concentrate on keeping the weight as close to your body as possble (elbows high), and accelerate the weight through the top!

Power Curls aren’t really an Oly movement at all. They will of course help build larger biceps and you’ll find them particularly taxing on the tendons of the upper arm. I don’t know why people are slagging your clean form when they’ve never seen it, but that just seems to be standard on T-Nation these days.

Here’s some extracts from the Dan John post about Power Curls.

"The Power Curl is just one name given to fairly common movement in lifting and throwing circles. It also goes by the titles ?cheat curls? or ?curl grip power cleans.? Easier to teach and learn than traditional power cleans, power curls can be used as a core lift or assistance exercise … with heavy cheat curls, the athlete simply starts adding back bend, some leg help, and trap pulling from the first attempt.
This exercise was a favorite of four time Olympic discus champion Al Oerter. Richard Sorin states: ?When question about the best single exercise he used to develop his power for throwing I received a curious reply?Heavy cheat curls.? … The other variation is from the floor. Attempt the lift like the traditional clean, except hold the bar in the curl grip. Keep the chest full, lower back tight, and ?push the floor away.? When the bar touches at the second pull position, perhaps an inch or so above the knees, continue to ?jump? and do the normal motions of back and thighs. However, the arms, rather than ?screwing under? or ?turning over,? the arms simply curl to the top curl position … when bringing the bar down, fight the bar off the top position as it goes down, if you want more biceps and forearm strength … Repetitions in this exercise work well as opposed to traditional power cleans. Sets of up to eight are easily managed.