T Nation

Citric Acid Cycle Question

How can one increase TCA cycle activity through nutritional intervention?

First of all, I couldn’t think about this when I was looking at your avatar; had to turn my head.

Second, I doubt any nutritional intervention would be ‘Significant’ in this manner, although I believe it can be enhanced via increasing one’s VO2 max (Don’t quote me on that though)

[quote]silverhydra wrote:
First of all, I couldn’t think about this when I was looking at your avatar; had to turn my head.

Second, I doubt any nutritional intervention would be ‘Significant’ in this manner, although I believe it can be enhanced via increasing one’s VO2 max (Don’t quote me on that though)[/quote]

I was thinking the same thing, but there has to be something, otherwise it wouldn’t have been a paper topic chosen for me by my teacher. I did some googling and MEDLINE’ing and I haven’t come up with anything.

Well, that is assuming that your teacher must have his act together.

This is a rather dismal project you’ve been assigned.

The only things I can think of for you to do are:

Thermic effect of food. Where RMR is increased, TCA cycle activity is increased. Because more calories are being burned.

And while it would be harder, you should be able to find something about how in dieting, availability of malic acid (or other TCA cycle intermediates, but supplying malic acid solves the problem, as does upregulating natural production of malate) can be a limiting factor in metabolism. It’s not a search I want to do, though I’ve done it before.

Or possibly the teacher wants to see affirmation of the “fats burn in the flame of carbohydrates” mantra. Which would be related to availability of TCA cycle intermediates.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Well, that is assuming that your teacher must have his act together.

This is a rather dismal project you’ve been assigned.

The only things I can think of for you to do are:

Thermic effect of food. Where RMR is increased, TCA cycle activity is increased. Because more calories are being burned.

And while it would be harder, you should be able to find something about how in dieting, availability of malic acid (or other TCA cycle intermediates, but supplying malic acid solves the problem, as does upregulating natural production of malate) can be a limiting factor in metabolism. It’s not a search I want to do, though I’ve done it before.

[/quote]

Thanks! This is a great starting point.

In addition (Feeding off of the VO2 max thingy), if one would assume that increased metabolic rate paired with an increased ability to utilize oxygen for the Citric Acid cycle could somehow enhance it’s effects. Possibly look into Cold-Fx (Siberian Ginseng, CVT-E002 is the extract I believe)

I added this to my pre-cardio mix and have been surprised at how efficient my lungs have been able to handle oxygen, although my HR goes up during cardio, breathing is fairly normal. Going to test it with a Tabata at a later date as the real deal breaker.

Of course, I have no evidence to back my hypothesis; it’s merely another lead for you :slight_smile:

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Or possibly the teacher wants to see affirmation of the “fats burn in the flame of carbohydrates” mantra. Which would be related to availability of TCA cycle intermediates.[/quote]

How true is that mantra? I know my professor was advocating the same thing, but I kept thinking of how many successful people have lost fat on a low carb diet.

So far as being relevant to general diet planning, it’s not.

Nor is it true with regard to whether having entirely sufficient TCA cycle intermediates – which are derived from carbohydrates or glucogenic amino acids – depends on a high carbohydrate intake.

Whether it is a relevant factor in why a near-zero-carb every-single-day-for-extended-periods diet is detrimental to bb’ing or strength acquisition, I don’t know.