T Nation

Circuit Running Immediately After Lifting?


#1

I have to run to keep my PT score up to max the Army PT test, but I have found it tough to combine running with the amount of lifting I like to do, squats in particular.

I have recently started doing a modified 5x5 SLs program doing 3 sets of 5, 3 times a week, and then doing a 15-20 minute bodyweight conditioning circuit immediately afterwards. In this circuit I do usually 4 rounds of either pull ups and push ups one day or chin ups and dips on another, and then I add in a form of conditioning (KB swings, battle ropes, box jumps). I have started combining a 400m run with these circuits per round. So for example, one day I would do 8 pull ups, 12 box jumps, 15 push ups, 400m run for 4 rounds following my strength workout.

Does this set up seem like it would be suitable for balancing squatting and running, as well as general strength development in general? I also run a steady paced long distance run on the weekends to keep my body used to that sort of running for when I have to run the actual 2 mile PT test.


#2

Sprints are a demand for you’re body to recover from just like a squat workout so I think you’re potentially doing to much. Long runs on the weekend should be plenty to keep your 2 mile time about where you want it to be.


#3

What if the 400s weren’t sprints, but only paced moderately faster than my 2 mile pace?


#4

I think you’re trying to throw everything and the kitchen snk at the problem, which rarely works. What, exactly, do want and need to do? Do you want to build or maintain strength, size, endurance? Specifics would be nice. You’ll probably be able to achieve a lot at the same time if you do it correctly, i.e. not the way you’ve set things up.


#5

I’d like to increase weight in the big lifts while decreasing my run time in short, also gaining size in the process would be a nice bonus.


#6

[quote]totalfitness_1 wrote:
I’d like to increase weight in the big lifts while decreasing my run time in short, also gaining size in the process would be a nice bonus. [/quote]

That’s not very specific. But I’ll try. Here are some suggestions:

Do a program that does not have you squat 3x/week. Your legs can only do so much.

Do intervalls/hill sprints/prowler sprints after your Wednesday session.

Do a timed run on Saturdays. Something like 2 to 4 miles, whatever works best for the distance you’re being tested on.

Forget the whole circuit bullshit. It will do very little to condition you for running.


#7

Thanks for the suggestions, I really appreciate the help. Sorry for my lack of specificity, still trying to get a handle on this whole forum thing.


#8

[quote]totalfitness_1 wrote:
I have to run to keep my PT score up to max the Army PT test, but I have found it tough to combine running with the amount of lifting I like to do, squats in particular.

I have recently started doing a modified 5x5 SLs program doing 3 sets of 5, 3 times a week, and then doing a 15-20 minute bodyweight conditioning circuit immediately afterwards. In this circuit I do usually 4 rounds of either pull ups and push ups one day or chin ups and dips on another, and then I add in a form of conditioning (KB swings, battle ropes, box jumps). I have started combining a 400m run with these circuits per round. So for example, one day I would do 8 pull ups, 12 box jumps, 15 push ups, 400m run for 4 rounds following my strength workout.

Does this set up seem like it would be suitable for balancing squatting and running, as well as general strength development in general? I also run a steady paced long distance run on the weekends to keep my body used to that sort of running for when I have to run the actual 2 mile PT test.
[/quote]

Current strength, conditioning, age, and bw/bf?

Like stated, sprints are extremely demanding on the CNS. Box jumps can be too.

Personally, in your case since you are training for something very specific, I think your training should revolve around that. You can find a balance between lifting and reaching your conditioning goals, but you want to focus more on training for your specific goals, not fitness or conditioning in general.


#9

Just for running, I’d say 800’s paced about 10% faster than your current 2 mile time would be more useful than 400’s. Maybe 4-6x 40m sprints with 45 sec rest as speed work/CNS activation. Rest 5 min then 4-6x paced 800m with 3 min rest between. Intervals twice a week and one longer steady state run.

I’d also say it really depends on how long you have until your PFT. If you’re 6 weeks out from your test, your training should be all about maxing your score. If you’re 6 months out you can maybe you can afford to play around a little more trying to balance lifting and running.


#10

I say give it a try and see if you improve. If you start getting fatigued, feel drained, weak or slow you will need to cut back and or eliminate some things. There is no reason not to give it a shot and see how you do. Running a little faster than your mile pace is not going to kill your CNS. The volume may be too much for you to recover from or it may be too little or just what you need. There is no way to know until you give it a go.


#11

Get off strong lifts and move on to Texas method or a Waterbury program otherwise you will hit a wall, but apart from that lifting followed by heavy conditioning is a winning formula.

Complexes also somthing to consider and Thibs ‘zombie apocalypse program’ also worth reading


#12

Sprinting, tempo training and max effort type stuff for running is a fast adaption that pretty much only need a few sessions to get you up to speed so with that in mind why not keep the running and cardio easy and non taxing until you’re nearing your PT? You risk nothing that way whereas sprinting and intervaling at best MAY not hurt your lifting and will have a marginal effect on the two mile run.