T Nation

Chronic High Body Fat/Weight

ok so suppose you’ve been fat for ~10 years. my question is, is your body then more used to having such a high body fat OR weight?

to explain further… if you have been 100 kgs for 10 years but you had say 20% body fat

and then after a few years, you bulk up to 130 kgs or something and then cut down to 100 kgs with a 5% body fat, will the body be ok with that weight and body fat(compared to its past), or will it still be more prone(compared to the average person who has had a 12% body fat throughout his life) towards adding fat? (regardless of body type… just what its used to in the past)

thats pretty much a pointless question in my opinion…no offense…but whehter the body could be more prone to putting on fat or not shouldnt matter if the person isnt putting in them stuff that would make them fat.

This is actually an area of contention. One of the theories is the “set point” theory where the body has a set point, a level of body fat that it considers normal. Under the theory people have to fight to change there body fat while there body will want to go back to normal. This theory also says that it is possible to move the set point up and down through diligent lifestyle changes.

This theory can be used to explain why some people that were fat, get lean, and have difficulty maintaining that level of leanness.

I don’t know if this is actually the case, or if the reason is psychological not physiological.

[quote]Zagman wrote:
This is actually an area of contention. One of the theories is the “set point” theory where the body has a set point, a level of body fat that it considers normal. Under the theory people have to fight to change there body fat while there body will want to go back to normal. This theory also says that it is possible to move the set point up and down through diligent lifestyle changes.

This theory can be used to explain why some people that were fat, get lean, and have difficulty maintaining that level of leanness.

I don’t know if this is actually the case, or if the reason is psychological not physiological.[/quote]

The idea of weight set points has very little to do with body fat itself and much more to do with overall BODY WEIGHT. If you get up to 230lbs once and you are carrying a good deal of body fat, but you maintain that weight for a few months. If you diet down and drop some excess body fat, it will likely be easier to get back to 230lbs with even more muscle mass. You have now changed your weight set point. This takes time and obviously takes consistency in the gym.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Zagman wrote:
This is actually an area of contention. One of the theories is the “set point” theory where the body has a set point, a level of body fat that it considers normal. Under the theory people have to fight to change there body fat while there body will want to go back to normal. This theory also says that it is possible to move the set point up and down through diligent lifestyle changes.

This theory can be used to explain why some people that were fat, get lean, and have difficulty maintaining that level of leanness.

I don’t know if this is actually the case, or if the reason is psychological not physiological.

The idea of weight set points has very little to do with body fat itself and much more to do with overall BODY WEIGHT. If you get up to 230lbs once and you are carrying a good deal of body fat, but you maintain that weight for a few months. If you diet down and drop some excess body fat, it will likely be easier to get back to 230lbs with even more muscle mass. You have now changed your weight set point. This takes time and obviously takes consistency in the gym.[/quote]

So, according to this logic, the following example is viable?

I weighed 180 lbs back in August. I now weigh 245 lbs and plan on bulking up to 260 lbs by early May. If I cut down from about 20% BF to 5% (putting me at about 221 lbs), will it be easier to reach 260 again with a lot more muscle mass simply because I’ve weighed that much before?

Though I do not by any means plan on staying at 260, which is one factor which would deviate from your idea of first maintaining the weight. Would it matter?

[quote]drummerofgod89 wrote:
Professor X wrote:
Zagman wrote:
This is actually an area of contention. One of the theories is the “set point” theory where the body has a set point, a level of body fat that it considers normal. Under the theory people have to fight to change there body fat while there body will want to go back to normal. This theory also says that it is possible to move the set point up and down through diligent lifestyle changes.

This theory can be used to explain why some people that were fat, get lean, and have difficulty maintaining that level of leanness.

I don’t know if this is actually the case, or if the reason is psychological not physiological.

The idea of weight set points has very little to do with body fat itself and much more to do with overall BODY WEIGHT. If you get up to 230lbs once and you are carrying a good deal of body fat, but you maintain that weight for a few months. If you diet down and drop some excess body fat, it will likely be easier to get back to 230lbs with even more muscle mass. You have now changed your weight set point. This takes time and obviously takes consistency in the gym.

So, according to this logic, the following example is viable?

I weighed 180 lbs back in August. I now weigh 245 lbs and plan on bulking up to 260 lbs by early May. If I cut down from about 20% BF to 5% (putting me at about 221 lbs), will it be easier to reach 260 again with a lot more muscle mass simply because I’ve weighed that much before?

Though I do not by any means plan on staying at 260, which is one factor which would deviate from your idea of first maintaining the weight. Would it matter?[/quote]

If you have the genetics to eventually weigh 260lbs with most of that being lean body mass, then yes, that is what I have seen myself and in others.

Ask any bodybuilder about the ‘rebound’ they get after a show (if done right) and it pretty much supports the set-point theory.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
drummerofgod89 wrote:
Professor X wrote:
Zagman wrote:
This is actually an area of contention. One of the theories is the “set point” theory where the body has a set point, a level of body fat that it considers normal. Under the theory people have to fight to change there body fat while there body will want to go back to normal. This theory also says that it is possible to move the set point up and down through diligent lifestyle changes.

This theory can be used to explain why some people that were fat, get lean, and have difficulty maintaining that level of leanness.

I don’t know if this is actually the case, or if the reason is psychological not physiological.

The idea of weight set points has very little to do with body fat itself and much more to do with overall BODY WEIGHT. If you get up to 230lbs once and you are carrying a good deal of body fat, but you maintain that weight for a few months. If you diet down and drop some excess body fat, it will likely be easier to get back to 230lbs with even more muscle mass. You have now changed your weight set point. This takes time and obviously takes consistency in the gym.

So, according to this logic, the following example is viable?

I weighed 180 lbs back in August. I now weigh 245 lbs and plan on bulking up to 260 lbs by early May. If I cut down from about 20% BF to 5% (putting me at about 221 lbs), will it be easier to reach 260 again with a lot more muscle mass simply because I’ve weighed that much before?

Though I do not by any means plan on staying at 260, which is one factor which would deviate from your idea of first maintaining the weight. Would it matter?

If you have the genetics to eventually weigh 260lbs with most of that being lean body mass, then yes, that is what I have seen myself and in others.[/quote]

Very interesting. Though there gets to be a point where genetics will overtake the theory. I, however, believe that anyone can reach any weight that can be humanly reached if they wish. For example, a 130 lb runt could eat enough to weigh 300 lbs with high BF %. Let’s say said fatass decided to diet back down. Would he be able to gain muscle faster than before because he has been a previously high weight.

“Very interesting. Though there gets to be a point where genetics will overtake the theory. I, however, believe that anyone can reach any weight that can be humanly reached if they wish. For example, a 130 lb runt could eat enough to weigh 300 lbs with high BF %. Let’s say said fatass decided to diet back down. Would he be able to gain muscle faster than before because he has been a previously high weight.”

Unless he was bedridden, he would have gained muscle just from carrying all that fat around.

Most general metrics tend to break down when taken to extremes, even fairly precise ones. Examples include: from chemistry-the ideal gas law, from physics–simple harmonic motion, from biology–population growth/ceiling. That doesn’t mean that these aren’t extremely useful tools for predicting natural phenomena.