T Nation

Chinese High Pulls

@CT:

I am really liking Chinese High Pulls.

When I ramp as you have suggested, SGHP, SGCP, SGLP, CGLP, upon starting SGCP my traps REALLY wake up - it’s almost like someone shocked them with current.

Is that because of the SGHP potentiating the next movement, SGCP?

Or, is it just a superior exercise for traps?

I like them so much, I’ve been doing those for my last layer @ 80% of my max ramp in that move. But, since I tend to get out of position with the pull from the hang, I reset each rep on the blocks so I can rock my chest up - really helps me to get bar higher. Is that OK?

Also, is there a WO where you would set up layers with just SGCP?

Thanks!
M

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
@CT:

I am really liking Chinese High Pulls.

When I ramp as you have suggested, SGHP, SGCP, SGLP, CGLP, upon starting SGCP my traps REALLY wake up - it’s almost like someone shocked them with current.

Is that because of the SGHP potentiating the next movement, SGCP?

Or, is it just a superior exercise for traps?

I like them so much, I’ve been doing those for my last layer @ 80% of my max ramp in that move. But, since I tend to get out of position with the pull from the hang, I reset each rep on the blocks so I can rock my chest up - really helps me to get bar higher. Is that OK?

Also, is there a WO where you would set up layers with just SGCP?

Thanks!
M

[/quote]

It hits the trap more if you do them right. Those who will simply try to bring the chest to the bar (by bending forward) will not feel it in their traps. The traps are involved in PULLING YOU DOWN… basically you pull yourself down using the bar, which hits the full range of motion of the traps.

I think the Chinese Pull is a little difficult to learn. I’ve done them for a total of 3 sessions and they feel very odd yet.

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think the Chinese Pull is a little difficult to learn. I’ve done them for a total of 3 sessions and they feel very odd yet.[/quote]

Yes, the timing is important. As soon as the launch is over you must slam your heels into the ground while bending the knees and pulling yourself down using the bar.

I think just by watching videos of the Chinese Pull I was just bending down to the bar after the launch was over and not even really thinking about what I was trying to accomplish.

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think just by watching videos of the Chinese Pull I was just bending down to the bar after the launch was over and not even really thinking about what I was trying to accomplish. [/quote]

Actually if you look at those videos, they aren`t really bending down to the bar at all… they are bending at the knees and their fairly upright.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think the Chinese Pull is a little difficult to learn. I’ve done them for a total of 3 sessions and they feel very odd yet.[/quote]

Yes, the timing is important. As soon as the launch is over you must slam your heels into the ground while bending the knees and pulling yourself down using the bar.[/quote]
This just clicked with me in my session last night and what a great feeling in my traps.Did some practice reps this morning just so i could feel the motion again and stay in the groove.

@CT:

Could you please give us your observations on this lifter’s form/technique?

Thanks!
M

^^^

Not sure why I can’t embed that video - oh well…


@CT:

Again, another great session with the ramping method you have shared with us.

My traps are on fire; it’s truly the first time I’ve been able to really feel them with an exercise.

It seems too that with each high pull session, my pulls become much more ‘snappy’. They feel 2x as fast as when I started - that’s probably an exaggeration but, a vast improvement, nonetheless.

I think I’m addicted to the Chinese High Pull - it’s going to take some time to get my technique where I want it.

What can I do to get my torso more upright?

Should I move hands in/out?

Right now my grip is one hand’s width inside the collars - long arms, short torso.

I pull from blocks set at just below mid thigh.

Thanks!

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
^^^

Not sure why I can’t embed that video - oh well…


@CT:

Again, another great session with the ramping method you have shared with us.

My traps are on fire; it’s truly the first time I’ve been able to really feel them with an exercise.

It seems too that with each high pull session, my pulls become much more ‘snappy’. They feel 2x as fast as when I started - that’s probably an exaggeration but, a vast improvement, nonetheless.

I think I’m addicted to the Chinese High Pull - it’s going to take some time to get my technique where I want it.

What can I do to get my torso more upright?

Should I move hands in/out?

Right now my grip is one hand’s width inside the collars - long arms, short torso.

I pull from blocks set at just below mid thigh.

Thanks!
[/quote]

I cannot tell you what to focus on if I do not see YOU lift, not some other guy’s video.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think just by watching videos of the Chinese Pull I was just bending down to the bar after the launch was over and not even really thinking about what I was trying to accomplish. [/quote]

Actually if you look at those videos, they aren`t really bending down to the bar at all… they are bending at the knees and their fairly upright.[/quote]

For anyone who wants to get decent at the Olympic lifts, do NOT get in the habit of “bending down” to the bar. It is very easy to develop this bad habit on pulls. I have been guilty of this. I have to really focus on staying upright when I do pulls. But the benefit is that you get some work in your lower back and hips maintaining an upright posture.

I’m starting to really like pulls.

[quote]MikeTheBear wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think just by watching videos of the Chinese Pull I was just bending down to the bar after the launch was over and not even really thinking about what I was trying to accomplish. [/quote]

Actually if you look at those videos, they aren`t really bending down to the bar at all… they are bending at the knees and their fairly upright.[/quote]

For anyone who wants to get decent at the Olympic lifts, do NOT get in the habit of “bending down” to the bar. It is very easy to develop this bad habit on pulls. I have been guilty of this. I have to really focus on staying upright when I do pulls. But the benefit is that you get some work in your lower back and hips maintaining an upright posture.

I’m starting to really like pulls.
[/quote]

In may olympic lifting cicles, pulls have a bad reputation because they teach you do pull high and hang with the pull. Obviously this is bad for the actual performance of the olympic lifts. That’s why I like chinese pull because they have the same dynamic structure as the corresponding full lift.

I was coaching one of my olympic lifters this morning and told her that the key point is to slam the heel into the floor and bend at the knees, not waist, when going down.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]MikeTheBear wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]jtbrown0511 wrote:
I think just by watching videos of the Chinese Pull I was just bending down to the bar after the launch was over and not even really thinking about what I was trying to accomplish. [/quote]

Actually if you look at those videos, they aren`t really bending down to the bar at all… they are bending at the knees and their fairly upright.[/quote]

For anyone who wants to get decent at the Olympic lifts, do NOT get in the habit of “bending down” to the bar. It is very easy to develop this bad habit on pulls. I have been guilty of this. I have to really focus on staying upright when I do pulls. But the benefit is that you get some work in your lower back and hips maintaining an upright posture.

I’m starting to really like pulls.
[/quote]

In may olympic lifting cicles, pulls have a bad reputation because they teach you do pull high and hang with the pull. Obviously this is bad for the actual performance of the olympic lifts. That’s why I like chinese pull because they have the same dynamic structure as the corresponding full lift.

I was coaching one of my olympic lifters this morning and told her that the key point is to slam the heel into the floor and bend at the knees, not waist, when going down.
[/quote]

Unfortunately, I’m noticing that when I try to slam my heel into the floor, I end up doing like a bunny hop and then the heel makes contact with the floor. Still feels very explosive, but…I don’t think optimal.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Mutsanah wrote:
^^^

Not sure why I can’t embed that video - oh well…


@CT:

Again, another great session with the ramping method you have shared with us.

My traps are on fire; it’s truly the first time I’ve been able to really feel them with an exercise.

It seems too that with each high pull session, my pulls become much more ‘snappy’. They feel 2x as fast as when I started - that’s probably an exaggeration but, a vast improvement, nonetheless.

I think I’m addicted to the Chinese High Pull - it’s going to take some time to get my technique where I want it.

What can I do to get my torso more upright?

Should I move hands in/out?

Right now my grip is one hand’s width inside the collars - long arms, short torso.

I pull from blocks set at just below mid thigh.

Thanks!
[/quote]

I cannot tell you what to focus on if I do not see YOU lift, not some other guy’s video.[/quote]

I know…I know, but WITSEC requirements and all…

Ne me detestez pas.