T Nation

Checking Your Prostate?

 Is this possible? What would you look for? Should this be done on a lengthy cycle? Have any of you? Did you like it?...Just kidding on the last one.

Get your girlfriend to do it…you might like it.

[quote]WideGuy wrote:
Is this possible? What would you look for? Should this be done on a lengthy cycle? Have any of you? Did you like it?..Just kidding on the last one.[/quote]

Hey wideguy

When i found a lump on my testicle the doc jammed his finger up my butthole and checked my prostate,now if u want uncomfortable get it done,it feels like u shit everywhere but u dont (hard to explain) He says that my prostate was nice and soft and fine,so im assuming if its soft and has no nasty lumps or anything like that u should be fine.
But if u feel like doing it yourself then bring on the rubber gloves and ky jelly and have a good time :smiley:

[quote]HHH wrote:
He says that my prostate was nice and soft and fine,so im assuming if its soft and has no nasty lumps or anything like that u should be fine.
But if u feel like doing it yourself then bring on the rubber gloves and ky jelly and have a good time :D[/quote]

Um, I would be VERY disturbed if my doctor used those adjectives to describe my inner butthole workings.

I’d probably go take a long huddled shower.

I’d be disturbed if, during the check, I could see both his hands.

I might as well be the first to point it out, there’s no such thing as checking your PROSTRATE. Checking your prostate, on the other hand, is important to early diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is cancer of the prostate gland. The prostate is the small, walnut-shaped gland that surrounds the bottom portion of a male’s bladder and about the first inch of the urinary tube, the channel that drains fluid from the bladder. It’s located behind the pubic bone and in front of the rectum. The prostate’s primary function is to produce seminal fluid.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. The American Cancer Society estimates that about 230,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer annually in the United States and that about 29,000 men die of the disease.

Prostate cancer frequently doesn’t produce symptoms. The first indication of a problem may come during a routine screening test. Screening tests include:

Digital rectal exam (DRE). During a DRE, your doctor inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into your rectum to examine your prostate, which is adjacent to the rectum. If your doctor finds any abnormalities in the texture, shape or size of your gland, you may need more tests.

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. A blood sample is drawn from a vein and analyzed for PSA, a substance that’s naturally produced by your prostate gland to help liquefy semen. It’s normal for a small amount of PSA to enter your bloodstream. However, if higher than normal levels are found, it may be an indication of prostate infection, inflammation, enlargement or cancer.

Urine test. A sample of your urine is analyzed for abnormalities that may indicate a problem. This test doesn’t detect prostate cancer, but it can help detect or rule out other conditions that may cause similar signs and symptoms.

Transrectal ultrasound. If other tests raise concerns, your doctor may use transrectal ultrasound to further evaluate your prostate. A small probe, about the size and shape of a cigar, is inserted into your rectum. The probe uses sound waves to get a picture of your prostate gland.

I apologize for the rather humorless answer to a humorless topic.

[quote]pookie wrote:
I’d be disturbed if, during the check, I could see both his hands.[/quote]

hahahahahahahaa

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, an epidemiological study of 30,000 American men has found that men who enjoy an active sex life do not risk prostate cancer in later life.

The study’s findings were that men who ejaculate between 13 and 20 times a month had a 14% lower risk of prostate cancer than men who ejaculated on average, between 4 and 7 times a month for most of their adult life.

Men who ejaculated upwards of 21 times a month had a 33% lower lifetime risk of prostate cancer than the baseline group. Ejaculation Frequency and Subsequent Risk of Prostate Cancer, JAMA, April 7, 2004; 291: 1578 - 1586.

So, Wideguy, I’d say you’re pretty much all set.

First off let me say that I’m sorry I mispelled prostate. Thanks for the heads up. ALSO, I was not joking at all and that was an excellent answer bro. THanks alot, and I just hope that more people become aware of this. Testosterone can increase your risk of prostate cancer soo…

I had it done today. I told the doctor that I had another thirty years before they pulled this crap on me. He didn’t even crack a smile…if some stranger is gonna stick his finger in my ass, I’d at least like him to have a sense of humor.

It sucked a whole bunch. Wasn’t fun. But they know you don’t like it, so it’s like a SEALs operation…get in and out quick as we can and nothing bad will happen.

Dude, whenever I read something like “. . . he was lying prostrate” I always do a double-take.

Why would someone even use the word prostrate?

Anyway, moving on . . .

[quote]WideGuy wrote:
First off let me say that I’m sorry I mispelled prostate.[/quote]

I wouldn’t go so far as to say that testosterone causes prostate cancer. But, there is evidence that high levels of testosterone are a risk factor linked to development of prostate cancer. So, it’s ironic that the hormone that we aim to boost on this site, may contribute to killing some of us.

Other more significant risk factors (which we have no control over) include age, race, and family history.

Age

The chance of having prostate cancer increases rapidly after age 50. About two thirds of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65.

Race

Prostate cancer occurs about 60% more often in black men than in white men. Prostate cancer occurs less frequently in Asian men than in whites. Hispanic men develop prostate cancer at similar rates as white men.

Family History

Prostate cancer seems to run in some families. Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk of developing this disease.

One of the risk factors is working against me (my father died of prostate cancer), but that doesn’t mean I’m willing to trade a longer life for low T. For me it’s a quality of life issue. One of the ways to reduce the risk of prostate cancer is castration (surgical or chemical). Some of the side effects are impotence, incontinence, loss of muscle mass and man boobs. Thanks but no thanks.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

Generally speaking, we as physicians only begin to screen for Prostate cancer at age 40 or if you have a family history we will check five years prior to the age at which your family member was diagnosed. Loose tool’s post contains good information, but almost seems cut and pasted from a text book. In answer to your question, it would be very difficult for someone to check their own prostate and even more difficult for someone who is untrained. A normal prostate is the size of a walnut and the texture should fel like your thenar eminence (fat pad just below your thumb on your palm) while making a fist. We usually check it nor only with our fingers, but with the PSA test as well. Hope this helps

“Loose tool’s post contains good information, but almost seems cut and pasted from a text book.”

Almost seems? What do you mean almost? It was. I plagiarized like hell. My goal was accuracy, not originality.

 I've had it checked.  It is NOT comfortable but as we age it is necessary.  I don't think you can do it yourself though.  You need to have a Doc do it (they know what they're looking for).  Sure it is kinda humiliating lol.  Good joke fodder for the golf course though.

Loose Tool,

I said “almost seems” because of the bit about your dad’s prostate cancer. But, if you say you plagerized it all…hey who am I to say otherwise…I was just giving you the benefit of doubt.

[quote]humanator wrote:
Loose Tool,

I said “almost seems” because of the bit about your dad’s prostate cancer. But, if you say you plagerized it all…hey who am I to say otherwise…I was just giving you the benefit of doubt.[/quote]

The part about my Dad wasn’t cut and pasted. Then of course, neither is the part that I’m at greater risk. Nor is my comment about quality of life.

I guess the human, almost warm, part is my voice. The dry factual textbook parts I plagiarized like hell.

Well, the human, almost warm part is appreciated, as is I’m sure to some…the dry, factual part.

All good, then,

humanator

I was so sick and tired of my prostate blowing up to the size of a honeydew. I’d be in a movie theatre trying to enjoy a showing of Harry Potter, and I’d start feeling as if I was going to give birth to penile turtle. It got so bad that I had to carry salad tongs with me, so if it flared up, I could go to the bathroom and use the tongs to squeeze all the juice out of it.

I finally had enough and tried to yank it out with the tongs. I had it pulled completely out of my anus. I used a mirror to look at. It looked kind of like a racoon fetus, but then I got scared and pushed it back in, and went straight to the doctor. He told me he could extract it, but would have to replace it with a prosthetic prostate, or else I would end up peeing backwards the rest of my life. So I had the surgery done and I feel great.