T Nation

Caution: New Credit Card Scam


Just a word of caution on the latest scam.
Those guys work really hard to work you over.

http://www.thestar.com/columnists/article/259472

There’s a new form of credit card fraud going around. Someone calls, gives his name and badge number and says he’s with the security and fraud department at Visa or M/C.

‘Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern and I’m calling to verify’ he says. The caller then asks you to look for seven numbers on the back of your card. He reads you the first four, which are part of your card number, and asks for the last three �?? the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card.

Never give out the last 3 numbers on your credit card to people who call you!

Cheers to your financial health.

Good scam.

A good method to use for ANY service that calls you for security reasons, is to ask for their name and phone number and tell them you’ll call them back.

Then call your institution at their listed number (NOT the one you were just given) and ask for the security department. You can then verify that the problem you were called for is actually occurring and you’ll be certain you’re talking to a real representative.

They might also be interested in the name and number you got, although unless the scammer is a complete idiot, you’ll have been given false info.

This advice is even more important for anything you get through email. DON’T click on links from security warnings, no matter how legit they appear. If you have some doubts, call directly to the institution and verify.

Thanks for the heads up TKO.

Attention, this is Greg Downing with Visa… I will need all of the members who posted in this thread to post their Visa Card Number in a PM to me to verify fraud on their account.

PM sent Mr. Downing, hope you can keep me safe from those mean people…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkZ-wAg_yPc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxhNtMFj7rc&mode=related&search=

[quote]pookie wrote:
Good scam.

A good method to use for ANY service that calls you for security reasons, is to ask for their name and phone number and tell them you’ll call them back.

Then call your institution at their listed number (NOT the one you were just given) and ask for the security department. You can then verify that the problem you were called for is actually occurring and you’ll be certain you’re talking to a real representative.

They might also be interested in the name and number you got, although unless the scammer is a complete idiot, you’ll have been given false info.

This advice is even more important for anything you get through email. DON’T click on links from security warnings, no matter how legit they appear. If you have some doubts, call directly to the institution and verify.
[/quote]

Excellent advice. Various forms of this scam have been used for years. NEVER give out ANY personal or financial information over the phone or through emails until you verify that it’s a legitimate source. For every scammer that gets apprehended there are dozens that don’t. Always be vigilant when these types of situations arise.

I forwarded this to my grandmother. Then, I called her up and pretended to be the scammer. Freaking hilarious!

DB

lol! Scaring your grandma, good times.