T Nation

'Catch Your Breath' HIIT Rest


#1

Context: I sprint for conditioning purposes, to increase speed, and burn a few calories. I do not and am not planning on competing.

I read a lot that after a sprint, to catch your breath, and then run another.

However, depending o the length of the sprint (and other factors), I may have caught my breath, but my CNS still feels all wound up.... or vice versa for longer sprints.

Should I rest until I calm down a bit, or just until I catch my breath? If I'm calm, should I continue resting until I've caught my breath?


#2

Hey 1 Man, as someone who has worked with Olympic Athletes and Meb Keflezghi (2009 NYC and 2014 Boston Marathon winner),
the best way to find your rest period length is to use a Heart Rate monitor. GET A GOOD ONE.

Most of us have sworn by Polar, something basic and good will cost you 100.00

Find your absolute max heart rate and use that as a basis. A couple greusome sprints and it should ping you well.
Then take 65% of this. When you do a sprint session: say 5 reps of 40 meters, when your heart rate returns to 65%
wait an additional 15 seconds then hit the next one hard.

Your interval rest session is going to vary Greatly based upon the length of sprint and the number of reps.

Feel free to ask as many questions as possible. I will try to get back to you within 24 hrs.
SPRINT KILL EAT !


#3

killerDirk, thank you for the information, I’m looking forward to applying it. I’ve always just used arbitrary round figures, such as resting for equal time as sprinting, or for 30 seconds or 45 seconds, etc. This method sounds promising and well-based.


#4

Bill Roberts: Thank you for the Compliment.
A lot of sports actually have a lot of commonalities.
We tend to focus on the differences instead of the similarities, such as:
Rowers, Sprinters and powerlifters will use a similar work to rest ratio, without even knowing it.
Think about a 15 second 100 meter sprint. Many times it will take 45-60 seconds to recover.
Now think about 1 set of 10. You may take 60 seconds doing it but then have a 3 minute recovery before next set.
Same 3:1 rest to work ratio !

The reason I also quanlified the “type” of Sprinting, running et al is because the rest intervals do change based upon:
Conditioning base, period of cycle, how close to a competition, overall health and style of training. Many factors.

Again though, feel free to keep asking the questions and I will do my best to get the T-Nation crew the latest Scientific Based
Up to Date info that I can…


#5

Thanks Dirk. Sounds like a good approach.

But I’ll be honest. I’m not going to drop 100 bucks to work on my 20-30 min. of HIIT once or twice/week. But your post doesn’t mention anything about the CNS, so I’m inferring I can pretty much ignore this and just go by pulse.

Next time I sprint, I’ll cut my rest a little short. After 3-4 sprints, I’ll assume that’s around my max pulse and go from there.


#6

[quote]1 Man Island wrote:
…but my CNS still feels all wound up…
[/quote]

What are the physical manifestations of a wound up CNS that you feel?


#7

[quote]killerDIRK wrote:
Hey 1 Man, as someone who has worked with Olympic Athletes and Meb Keflezghi (2009 NYC and 2014 Boston Marathon winner),
the best way to find your rest period length is to use a Heart Rate monitor. GET A GOOD ONE.

Most of us have sworn by Polar, something basic and good will cost you 100.00

Find your absolute max heart rate and use that as a basis. A couple greusome sprints and it should ping you well.
Then take 65% of this. When you do a sprint session: say 5 reps of 40 meters, when your heart rate returns to 65%
wait an additional 15 seconds then hit the next one hard.

Your interval rest session is going to vary Greatly based upon the length of sprint and the number of reps.

Feel free to ask as many questions as possible. I will try to get back to you within 24 hrs.
SPRINT KILL EAT !
[/quote]

Is this to increase your speed or to increase your endurance?

What are some decent times for 5’10 215lb guy on a mile time? about.


#8

Airtruth: For someone that Does Not Run Sub 9 would be 'ok". If you are relatively conditioned6 and do run than in the 7 minutes ends up being good, in the 6 is very good and 5:30 would be great !

Basically here is a good break down for well conditioned athletes that do some running:
100 meters sub 15 second
400 meters at/or sub 75 seconds
1600 5:30 to 7:00
5k 20-22:00
10K 39-45:00

Hope this helps !


#9

[quote]killerDIRK wrote:
Airtruth: For someone that Does Not Run Sub 9 would be 'ok". If you are relatively conditioned6 and do run than in the 7 minutes ends up being good, in the 6 is very good and 5:30 would be great !

Basically here is a good break down for well conditioned athletes that do some running:
100 meters sub 15 second
400 meters at/or sub 75 seconds
1600 5:30 to 7:00
5k 20-22:00
10K 39-45:00

Hope this helps ![/quote]

Self Timed I’m around 12 on 100m, but anything over that I’m pitiful. 400, is about a a minute and half, mile fastest in recent memory is 8:30

What about your initial suggestion for recovery, is that time frame help increase speed or endurance?


#10

I think it depends if your principle goal is fat loss or speed development.

Fat loss, shortish rests are probably OK. The “catch your breath” mentality.

If you’re sprinting to be fast, full recovery (like, 4-5 minute rest) is probably better.


#11

[quote]ActivitiesGuy wrote:
I think it depends if your principle goal is fat loss or speed development.

Fat loss, shortish rests are probably OK. The “catch your breath” mentality.

If you’re sprinting to be fast, full recovery (like, 4-5 minute rest) is probably better.[/quote]
This!


#12

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

What are the physical manifestations of a wound up CNS that you feel?[/quote]

Kind of jittery, I guess, like after a heavy low rep set of squats of DL. Letting the adrenaline die down.

Sounds like a good approach for general conditioning would be a couple sets w/ low rest to get the body primed, a few sets w/ more rest for speed, and a few sets w/ low rest for fatloss/cardio.


#13

[quote]1 Man Island wrote:

[quote]Dr. Pangloss wrote:

What are the physical manifestations of a wound up CNS that you feel?[/quote]

Kind of jittery, I guess, like after a heavy low rep set of squats of DL. Letting the adrenaline die down.

Sounds like a good approach for general conditioning would be a couple sets w/ low rest to get the body primed, a few sets w/ more rest for speed, and a few sets w/ low rest for fatloss/cardio.
[/quote]

Jittery would be a good way of putting it. More in the 100-800 meter length. A properly run all out assault on the 800meter may have you puking as well. Not due to the muscles ability to compensate, but due to the nervous system overload that goes along with it.

This is known to happen to Rowers/ Scullers more than any other competitive athletes due to the complete body nervous system involvement.

The harder the effort basicaly then the longer the rest interval.
I have found the Tabata method to work well with the:
Prowler, Concept 2 Rowing Erg, Sprints.
Anything that activates the greatest amount of muscle.

Thanks for the questions and comments !


#14

So, I implemented the 65 percent heart rate today. Man, I must not have been resting enough before. It took FOREVER.

Highest my heart rate clocked was maybe 170, which is about where I want to be for my age, I guess. But I felt recovered from the sprints long before my heart rate fell to 65 percent.

It took like 6-7 minutes to come down. I only did 6 reps at about 35 yds, but I think I’m going to have to cut back on the volume and focus more on fat loss style for time’s sake. I can’t take 10 min. to rest between my speed sets.

My resting heart rate is fine, so I don’t know why it takes so long to recover.


#15

[quote]1 Man Island wrote:
So, I implemented the 65 percent heart rate today. Man, I must not have been resting enough before. It took FOREVER.

Highest my heart rate clocked was maybe 170, which is about where I want to be for my age, I guess. But I felt recovered from the sprints long before my heart rate fell to 65 percent.

It took like 6-7 minutes to come down. I only did 6 reps at about 35 yds, but I think I’m going to have to cut back on the volume and focus more on fat loss style for time’s sake. I can’t take 10 min. to rest between my speed sets.

My resting heart rate is fine, so I don’t know why it takes so long to recover.[/quote]

That’s why I asked, I think once you get in good condition maybe it’ll take less time to get down to full recovery.


#16

What do you for recovery?

Stand with your hands on your knees? Walk? Run at a slower pace?


#17

Walk, look for a mellower song on my mp3, maybe some light stretching, an a2g squat for mobility, take my heart rate like 5x, focused breathing, hum, twiddle my thumbs, generally just try to kill the time. I don’t feel that tired; my heartrate just likes to stay elevated.

I don’t get so jittery now. I think that was primarily a factor of moving from 20yd sprints to 30-40 yds.