T Nation

Casein and Milk


#1

I read in other threads that Casein protein should only be taken with water. What I want to know is if there's any major difference with taking it with milk.

I have low carb metabollic drive and I know that in the back it says take it with cold water but I've been taking it with milk. Is there anything bad about that because if there is any drawbacks with taking it with milk I'll gladly take it with water. Thanks for any input


#2

Why would it be any different with milk? Casein is a milk protein. If anything, drinking it with milk would be better than water IMO.


#3

That's what I was thinking but then I read that Casein should be taken with water and I didn't really know why or if there was any advantages with taking it water so I decided to ask. Anyone else?


#4

I bet it taste better with milk too.


#5

For what it's worth, I like LCMD with milk as well. That said, taking it with milk can negate the "low carb" benefit... milk has carbs. Roughly 12g per 8oz./cup of non-fat milk.


#6

It probably just suggests to take it with water because the casein is isolated to avoid those with milk allergies. The company might just want to be safe and have you drink it with water than with milk in case you can't handle milk.

Total speculation, by the way.


#7

Due to it's nature casien is VERY thick when put in milk.

I happen to like it like that, it feels like a real milkshake.


#8

Really the answer to this lies in what you want from your protein powder? If you want a protein as a base for adding carbs, fats too, then why not? If you want a product to use simply as a low carb protein source, then probably not a good idea. If you handle milk O.k and wish to gain weight, go for it!

Milk proteins are great, the carbs, not so much.

Most protein powders contain pure, extracted versions of milk proteins. Some companies, the better ones, may even go to great lengths to ensure that their products contain specific ratios of various protein types, amino acids etc to ensure optimal digestibility, usability. Mixing such products with milk could compromise this obviousley, however, in actuality the difference it will likely make is pretty small.

If you dont handle lactose too well then the irritation that ingesting the lactose could cause may affect digestion absorption of the proteins.

If milk is derived from a grass fed cow, then the fats will be pretty good too.

Now, consi